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Johann Georg Zimmermann letter, Hannover, 1784, June 27 1 item

ALS. Describes the case history of Prince Frederick of England, who suffered from attacks of intermittent fever and convulsive asthma.
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John Zeigler papers, 1927-2013 (bulk 1942-1946) 2.2 Linear Feet — 1010 Items

Poet and book store owner in Charleston, SC. Collection predominantly contains World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, along with Zeigler's correspondence with his family. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients of Zeigler's correspondence and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include some documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writing and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

The John Ziegler correspondence spans the dates 1927-2013, with the bulk of the material consisting of World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, although there is also extensive correspondence between Zeigler and his family present. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writings and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

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Edward Raymond Zane letters and petition, 1960 0.5 Linear Feet

Several hundred letters and petitions, dated February-March 1960, from citizens of Greensboro, N.C. to Chairman Edward Raymond Zane and other members of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations, expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the Woolworth and Kress lunch counters in the wake of the Greensboro sit-in demonstrations of early February 1960.

Collection contains several hundred letters and petitions from citizens of Greensboro expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the city's lunch counters, specifically at Woolworth's and Kress.

The letters, dated February-March 1960, are chiefly addressed to Zane as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations in Greensboro or to Mayor George Roach and other members of the Advisory Committee. As Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Zane wrote an article in the Greensboro Daily News in the wake of the sit-ins soliciting the opinions of Greensboro citizens concerning the integration of lunch counters at Woolworth's and Kress.

Zane asked citizens to consider five alternatives to the situation: 1) "The situation to remain as it is," 2) "The two establishments to remove seats and serve everyone standing," 3) "The two establishments to serve everyone seated," 4) "The two establishments to reserve separate areas for seated white people and seated Negroes," and 5) "The two establishments to discontinue serving food."

Letters from both whites and African Americans offer support or opposition to Zane's alternatives and document sentiment regarding race relations in the community.

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Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) at Duke University records, circa 1923-1985 7.2 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Kristen R. Yount collection on socialist feminism, 1973-1975 and undated 1 Linear Foot

Kristen R. Yount is associate professor of sociology, coordinator of the Sustainable Future Program at Northern Kentucky University. Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975.

Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975. Includes fliers and handouts; organizational histories, guiding documents, "principles of unity," information sheets, and position statements; pamphlets; film lists; a working paper; action notices; published articles; and newspaper clippings. Also includes handwritten notes on the relationship of Asian women to the larger movement, possibly written by Yount. During processing pieces created for use at the national conference were placed first in the folder, followed by material grouped according to the state in which the local socialist-feminist unit was located.

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Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham, NC records, 1894-1992 110 Linear Feet

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

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William Young notebook of seventy-seven sermons, 1835-1848 0.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Rev. William Young, was an itinerant Methodist preacher. Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848.

Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848. Each sermon is identified by a date and place and is signed by Young. They approximately follow the chronology of Young's circuit appointments. The text is followed by an index in which there is a brief thematic description of each sermon, along with the Bible verse upon which it is based.

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Isaac Jones Young Films, 1933-1940 14 items — 8mm film reels — 1.5 Linear Feet — 122 Gigabytes — MKV (FFV1) digital preservation files

Fourteen 8mm motion picture films created or collected by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina, primarily documenting his time spent in China in the late 1930s.

The Isaac Jones Young Films contains fourteen 8mm films made primarily by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina. Eleven of the films document Jones's experiences in China, particularly around Shanghai and Tianjin, during the period 1936 to 1940, when he was employed by the Yi Tsoong Tobacco Company (British-American Tobacco's British Cigarette Company). Images include Shanghai in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of China as part of the Sino-Japanese War, temples and parks in Beijing, a tobacco market and factory, the 1939 Tianjin Flood, stilt walkers, and Young's European/American colleagues in China. One of the films captures a birthday party at Young's family home in Henderson, NC. Two of the films were collected by Young, including a Kodak Cinefilm promotional reel profiling Hawaii, and a silent, black and white print of anime pioneer Noburo Ofuji's 1933 film, The Three Fearless Frogs (Kaeru sanyushi).

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Ian Young Correspondence on The Male Muse, 1972-1974 0.4 Linear Feet — 129 Items

Letters (128 items, 1972-1974) to Young from prospective contributors to The Male Muse, including W.H. Auden, William Barber, Victor Borsa, Bruce Boone, Jim Eggeling, Allen Ginsberg, and others. Although the majority of the letters deal specifically with possible poems for inclusion into the anthology, many of the writers touch on their lives as gay men and their opinions of gay literature. The letters contain many original autographs. The collection also includes a copy of the published book.

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Coletta Youngers papers, 1977-2004 and undated 21 Linear Feet

Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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John G. Younger papers, 1976-2001 1.5 Linear Feet

John G. Younger graduated from Stanford University in 1967 with a B. A. in History with Honors. At the University of Cincinnati, he earned an M. A. in Classics in 1969 and a Ph.D. in Classics in 1973. From 1973-1974, Dr. Younger taught at the Campion School in Athens Greece. From 1974-2002, he taught at Duke University, first as Assistant Professor of Classical Studies, then as Associate Professor and then Professor of Classical Archaeology. In 2002, Dr. Younger left Duke to teach at the University of Kansas as Professor in Classics and Humanities and Western Civilization. The collection contains records and papers concerning the FOCUS program, archaeology courses, gay activism and campus diversity issues. The materials include minutes and reports of the president's and other committees, correspondence, email, printed matter, financial records, photographs and drawings, archaeological reports and student course and term papers. The material ranges in date from 1976-2001.

The collection contains records and papers concerning the FOCUS program, archaeology courses, gay activism and campus diversity issues. The materials include minutes and reports of the president's and other committees, correspondence, email, printed matter, financial records, photographs and drawings, archaeological reports and student course and term papers. Major subjects include the University's diversity awareness program, benefits for same-sex spousal equivalents, and gay life on campus, the administration of the FOCUS program, and the history and archaeology of East and West campuses and Duke Forest. Some student papers are graded and the files include other student-identifiable records. Also includes scripts of plays written by Duke alum Kevin Patterson and other writers. Patterson was a member of Duke Players and died of AIDS in New York. One of his plays, Allen Turing: The Most Secret War, was produced on Broadway. The collection includes an early draft of this piece. The material ranges in date from 1976-2001.

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David X. Young films, 1955-2007 12.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes of film reels, one box of video- and audio-cassettes, and one box of CDs and DVDs.

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Collection consists of 8mm and 16mm films, videocassettes, compact discs, and audiocassettes, deriving from artist David X. Young's work in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. His New York work includes films of W. Eugene Smith working in his loft studio in 1971, as well as experimental films dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. Homemade audiocassette mix tapes document Young's interest in jazz as well as his piano playing. Videocassettes consist of reference copies of several films and television programs on W. Eugene Smith. This collection is part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. Original recordings are closed to research access pending reformatting.

The David X. Young Films, 1955-2007, includes film reels, videocassettes, and audiocassettes produced primarily by artist David X. Young between 1955 and 1996, in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. Although transferred to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library in 2012, the collection was originally acquired from Young’s estate by the Center for Documentary Studies, for use by Sam Stephenson in his research on W. Eugene Smith for the book The Jazz Loft Project (2010). As a consequence, nearly half the collection is comprised of materials relating to Young’s involvement in the production of "Let Truth Be The Prejudice," a half-hour documentary on Smith produced by CBS in 1971, as part of its Lamp Unto My Feet series. These materials include a composite print of the final 28-minute program, un-synced picture and soundtrack reels not used in the final program, and videocassette and disc copies of the reels created by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2007.

The balance of the collection consists primarily of elements related to film projects created by Young between 1955 and 1986, including Klaximo, Seven Haitian Moods, Duck Season. Many of the elements in the collection, representing these and other projects, were spooled--put together on one reel--to facilitate video transfer previous to the films being acquired by the Center for Documentary Studies.

In addition to these films, the collection contains nine audiocassette tapes, including radio broadcasts of music and spoken-word material, as well as one recording of David X. Young playing piano, and four VHS videocassette tapes, from television broadcasts of programs on W. Eugene Smith.

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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Brantley York records and papers, 1838 - 1966 0.3 Linear Feet

Brantley York was an educator, author, and Methodist clergyman in North Carolina. He organized Union Institute Academy at Brown's Schoolhouse in Randolph Co., N.C. in 1839, which would evolve into Normal College, Trinity College, and later Duke University. York also wrote an English grammar, as well as several other instructional textbooks. The Brantley York Records and Papers contain correspondence, a grade book, certificates, manuscripts, and published works. Modern materials were added to the collection; these include York family genealogical information, as well as clippings about York and his activities. Major subjects include the early history of Union Institute, Normal College, Trinity College and Duke University; education in North Carolina in the 19th century; and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The Brantley York Records and Papers include correspondence, clippings, a grade book, certificates, manuscripts, and published works. Modern materials were added to the collection; these include York family genealogical information, as well as clippings about York and his activities. Preservation photocopies of all deteriorating clippings have been made for patron use.

The first series, Brantley York papers, includes certificates and other documents, a small amount of correspondence, and a grade book. The second series, Writings, features manuscript drafts and a published copy of York's autobiography, as well as copies of three of his instructional texts. The final series contains both contemporary and modern clippings about Brantley York's life, work, and family members. Also included in this series is a York family genealogy.

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Beth York papers, 1968-2015 9.0 Linear Feet

Musician and academic music therapist. Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985. Also includes materials documenting academic career including research, teaching, publishing, and grant administration.

Collection includes manuscripts, sound recordings, and photographs from York's music career, with materials from her participation at the 1986 International Music Festival; press kits with photographs and reviews of her music; contracts and agreements from Ladyslipper Inc.; and materials relating to her album Transformations, released in 1985.

Accession 2018-0113 consists of materials documenting York's academic career as a music therapist, including her M.A. thesis, university evaluations and a tenure portfolio, teaching materials, research materials, conference materials, presentations, correspondence, workshop materials, a performance piece called Finding Voice, grant materials, and music therapy workshop materials.

York also co-edited a number of issues of the lesbian feminist quarterly Sinister Wisdom, which are included in the collection, as are production materials, drafts, and correspondence related to those issues. Also included are issues of the women's periodicals Hotwire and Paid My Dues.

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J. Russell Yoder postcard collection, approximately 1900-1982 and undated 19 Linear Feet — circa 24,500 Items

International collection of picture postcards (6500 items, ca. 1900-1982), almost all of which date from 1920 or earlier. Arranged by country and filed in 28 albums. Almost all European countries are represented, and there are many rare postcards from Russia. (96-0135) (7 lf)

The addition to this collection (18000 items, from ca. 1900-1950) also is international in scope, but focuses on the United States. The collection comprises fifty, three-ring binders that hold picture postcards in pocketed mylar sleeves. About two-thirds of the cards show scenes in the United States, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; state capitols; worlds fairs; and other tourist destinations. Thirteen of the fifty binders document Atlantic City, N.J., and are subdivided by the images shown, including boardwalks, beaches, and hotels. The rest of the collection comprises postcards from other countries, including Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the Netherlands. Asia, Africa, Latin America, and North America are also represented. A small group of postcards depicts costumes from around the world. (00-422) (12 lf)

Formerly cataloged as the International Postcard Collection.

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Young Men's--Young Women's Christian Association at Duke University records, 1968-1979 3 Linear Feet

The Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association was created in 1969, an apparent merger of the men's and women's Y's elements. The YM-YWCA was a student religious organization operating within the Religious Activities Department and overseen by an advisory board and advised by the Associate Directors of Religious Activities. The collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. The dates in the collection range from circa 1968-1979.

Collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA, a social activist religious group, including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. Includes the logbook (1972/1973; restricted) and related material of the organization’s Draft Counseling and Information Center; "A White Paper on Institutional Racism at Duke: The Curriculum" (1972); listings of vocations for social change produced by OPT, its center for social change information; and copies of the handbook, The University Experience (1969/1970-1978/1979). The handbooks include essays on race relations, sexuality, civil rights and social change, and the experiences of foreign and minority students, as well as University history and administrative information. In an annual report (1970/1971) the book is said to have changed from "a book of interesting facts and figures" to "a rather controversial" alternative view of the University.

Also present in the collection are the records of the Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action (INSA) which was a leftist, activist agency of the Duke YM-YWCA. Their records include brochures, flyers, newsletters, manuals, and information concerning political and social issues of the early 1970s, and activities of the INSA. A sampling of topics include: Buddhism and nonviolence, Indochina; history, politics, and culture during the war, Cuba, UMWA (United Mine Workers Association), University investment, War -- bombing effects, and Wounded Knee. The INSA also collected flyers, brochures, and other printed matter from national organizations. Some organizations include: Committee on New Alternatives in the Middle East, Gandhi Peace Foundation, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and New American Movement.

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Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University records, 1920-1969 0.75 Linear Feet — 100 Items

The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University was established at then Trinity College in 1887-1888. In its early years, it functioned primarily as a sort of Bible class. Although it never abandoned its emphasis on Christianity, in its later years the YMCA dedicated itself more to campus and social service projects than Bible study. These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke Universityin the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University in the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

The majority of the records consist of reports of campus student religious organizations, and annual reports prepared by YMCA officers, which date from 1936-1967, although they are not inclusive. The annual reports summarize YMCA activities and projects from the past school year, and offer suggestions for the next year. See also catalogued and bound reports at call number 378.756 D887FA. There are two reports generated by the YMCA in the course of their campus activities: a proposal regarding the Freshman Advisory Council and a report on the success of the 1948 fund drive for the World Student Service Fund (WSSF). For more information on the incorporation of the Freshman Advisory Council (FAC) into the YMCA, see the annual report from 1957-1958. The remaining reports were created by other student religious organizations such as the Hillel Society (for Jewish students), the Baptist Student Union, and the YWCA. Correspondence is limited to one item. "Dads' Day" items consist of programs and schedules for the annual fathers' weekend. See also programs at call number 378.756 D887FD.

Publications are limited to examples of the student handbook and the "Dink," a daily publication for freshmen produced during Freshman Orientation Week. For other student handbooks see call number 378.756 D877S. For discussions of activities related to desegregation at Duke, see annual reports 1959-1960 and 1967-1968. Draft counseling materials are limited to announcements of seminars and conferences. For discussions of Vietnam and the selective service system, see annual reports of 1966-1967 and 1967-1968. For more information on Vietnam, the draft, and the counseling center, see YWCA and YM-YWCA Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action materials. Although there are no membership lists, there are quite inclusive lists of officers from 1888-1936 and 1956-1957.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988, 1987-1988 0.5 Linear Feet — Guide to the Lisa Unger Baskin collection of materials about Anzia Yezierska, 1987-1988

Anzia Yezierska (1880-1970) was a Polish-American author. Collection consists of materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin about the publication of "Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life," a biography by Yezierska's daughter, Louise Levitas Henriksen, published in 1988. Materials include drafts of a New York Times book review by Helen Yglesias. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Galley proof, unbound book manuscript, dust jacket, and materials regarding the publication of Anzia Yezierska: A Writer's Life, written by Louise Levitas Henriksen and Jo Ann Boydston in 1988. Includes a typescript draft with manuscript corrections of a review of the book by Helen Yglesias, later published in the New York Times.

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Helen Yglesias collection on Isabel Bishop, approximately 1988 0.2 Linear Feet

Helen Yglesias (1915-2008) was an American novelist. Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP.

Collection comprises photocopies of research material, along with an edited and final manuscript related to Yglesias' book, ISABEL BISHOP, published by Rizzoli, 1989, New York.