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Zuriel Waterman-Sarah Dean commonplace book, circa 1769-1774 0.2 Linear Feet

Zuriel Waterman was a physician from Cranston, Rhode Island and served as a surgeon aboard several American privateers during the Revolutionary War. He relocated to Edenton, North Carolina after the war. Commonplace book, dated circa 1769-1774, appears to have been created by Zuriel Waterman and Sarah Dean. The name Sarah Dean appears on the inside cover, but many later entries written in a different hand are attributed to Zuriel Waterman. The book contains a number of excerpts, verse, and other writings including: "A Chronological Table of Epithets of the Kings of England," "Versus on Mr. George Whitefield," "A Short and True Description of North Carolina and its Inhabitants," and "Care for bite of a mad dog." Also included is a count of inhabitants in the colony of Rhode Island by locale and race, a sketch of the city of Troy, a petition of the Continental Congress to the King of England, and various religious and political writings.

Commonplace book, dated circa 1769-1774, appears to have been created by Zuriel Waterman and Sarah Dean. The name Sarah Dean appears on the inside cover, but many later entries written in a different hand are attributed to Zuriel Waterman. The book contains a number of excerpts, verse, and other writings including: "A Chronological Table of Epithets of the Kings of England," "Versus on Mr. George Whitefield," "A Short and True Description of North Carolina and its Inhabitants," and "Care for bite of a mad dog." Also included is a count of inhabitants in the colony of Rhode Island by locale and race, a sketch of the city of Troy, a petition of the Continental Congress to the King of England, and various religious and political writings.

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Zora J. Murff photographs, 2013-2015 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 color inkjet prints

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa.

In the artist's statement, also included in the collection, Murff writes: "From 2012 to 2015, I worked as a Tracker for Linn County Juvenile Detention and Diversion Services in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. As a Tracker, I provided services to youths who were convicted of crimes, adjudicated, and subsequently ordered to complete probation...Through employing ideas of anonymity, voyeurism, and introspection, 'Corrections' is an examination of youth experience in the system, the role images play in defining someone who is deemed a 'criminal,' and how the concepts of privacy and control may affect their future."

This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Zerah C. Whipple letter, 1873 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection contains a 4-page letter (7 March 1873) Whipple wrote to Jeremiah Hacker, a Maine reformer, abolition advocate, journalist, and publisher of "The Pleasure Boat." Whipple mentions an article Hacker wrote for "The Voice of Peace," as well as his admiration for "The Pleasure Boat" and "N.P. Rogers' Newspaper Writings." He also discusses his difficulty printing "The Voice of Peace," and the increase in pacifism since the end of the Civil War, noting that abolitionists and industrialists Adin Ballou and E. D. Draper were constant in their support of peace, while members of the utopian Hopedale Community were "untrue to the professions of years." Whipple included a printed photograph with his letter.
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Yusuf Salim collection, circa 1982-1987 and undated 0.6 Linear Feet — 41 items

Yusuf Salim (1929-2008) was a jazz musician and composer who began his career in Baltimore in the 1940s. He moved to Durham, North Carolina in the 1970s where he taught jazz workshops through the Salaam Cultural Center and hosted a series on WUNC-TV. The collection contains manuscripts of 36 lead sheets for Salim's jazz compositions, a piece of prose by Salim, and a photocopy of an article about him from the Raleigh News and Observer.

The Yusuf Salim Collection (chiefly undated, but some dated between 1982 and 1987) has as its focal point manuscripts of 36 lead sheets for Salim's jazz compositions. One additional folder contains a piece of writing by Salim and a photocopy of an article on him from the Raleigh News and Observer from 1987. Acquired as part of the Jazz Archive at Duke University.

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Youth Noise Network records, 2000-2005 0.5 Linear Feet — 200 Items

Youth Noise Network (YNN) is a youth radio project based at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. YNN brings together a diverse group of Durham teenagers to produce a weekly radio show that addresses current issues of particular concern to teens. YNN participants learn various aspects of the documentary arts and produce their own audio documentaries. Collection includes some printed materials about youth radio as well as audiovisual materials that are closed to use until preservation copies can be made. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection includes some printed materials about youth radio as well as audiovisual materials that are closed to use until preservation copies can be made. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works Project records, 1995-2008 and undated 45.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,085 Items

Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham, NC records, 1894-1992 110 Linear Feet

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

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Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) at Duke University records, circa 1923-1985 7.2 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Young Men's--Young Women's Christian Association at Duke University records, 1968-1979 3 Linear Feet

The Young Men's-Young Women's Christian Association was created in 1969, an apparent merger of the men's and women's Y's elements. The YM-YWCA was a student religious organization operating within the Religious Activities Department and overseen by an advisory board and advised by the Associate Directors of Religious Activities. The collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. The dates in the collection range from circa 1968-1979.

Collection contains material pertaining to the activities and organization of the YM-YWCA, a social activist religious group, including annual reports, flyers, handbooks, directories, and materials documenting the joint efforts of the YMCA and YWCA around the same period. Includes the logbook (1972/1973; restricted) and related material of the organization’s Draft Counseling and Information Center; "A White Paper on Institutional Racism at Duke: The Curriculum" (1972); listings of vocations for social change produced by OPT, its center for social change information; and copies of the handbook, The University Experience (1969/1970-1978/1979). The handbooks include essays on race relations, sexuality, civil rights and social change, and the experiences of foreign and minority students, as well as University history and administrative information. In an annual report (1970/1971) the book is said to have changed from "a book of interesting facts and figures" to "a rather controversial" alternative view of the University.

Also present in the collection are the records of the Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action (INSA) which was a leftist, activist agency of the Duke YM-YWCA. Their records include brochures, flyers, newsletters, manuals, and information concerning political and social issues of the early 1970s, and activities of the INSA. A sampling of topics include: Buddhism and nonviolence, Indochina; history, politics, and culture during the war, Cuba, UMWA (United Mine Workers Association), University investment, War -- bombing effects, and Wounded Knee. The INSA also collected flyers, brochures, and other printed matter from national organizations. Some organizations include: Committee on New Alternatives in the Middle East, Gandhi Peace Foundation, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and New American Movement.

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Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University records, 1920-1969 0.75 Linear Feet — 100 Items

The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University was established at then Trinity College in 1887-1888. In its early years, it functioned primarily as a sort of Bible class. Although it never abandoned its emphasis on Christianity, in its later years the YMCA dedicated itself more to campus and social service projects than Bible study. These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke Universityin the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University in the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

The majority of the records consist of reports of campus student religious organizations, and annual reports prepared by YMCA officers, which date from 1936-1967, although they are not inclusive. The annual reports summarize YMCA activities and projects from the past school year, and offer suggestions for the next year. See also catalogued and bound reports at call number 378.756 D887FA. There are two reports generated by the YMCA in the course of their campus activities: a proposal regarding the Freshman Advisory Council and a report on the success of the 1948 fund drive for the World Student Service Fund (WSSF). For more information on the incorporation of the Freshman Advisory Council (FAC) into the YMCA, see the annual report from 1957-1958. The remaining reports were created by other student religious organizations such as the Hillel Society (for Jewish students), the Baptist Student Union, and the YWCA. Correspondence is limited to one item. "Dads' Day" items consist of programs and schedules for the annual fathers' weekend. See also programs at call number 378.756 D887FD.

Publications are limited to examples of the student handbook and the "Dink," a daily publication for freshmen produced during Freshman Orientation Week. For other student handbooks see call number 378.756 D877S. For discussions of activities related to desegregation at Duke, see annual reports 1959-1960 and 1967-1968. Draft counseling materials are limited to announcements of seminars and conferences. For discussions of Vietnam and the selective service system, see annual reports of 1966-1967 and 1967-1968. For more information on Vietnam, the draft, and the counseling center, see YWCA and YM-YWCA Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action materials. Although there are no membership lists, there are quite inclusive lists of officers from 1888-1936 and 1956-1957.

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York & Son human anatomy and physiology glass lantern slides, between 1888-1900 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 38 slides; one wooden storage box (empty) — 3 1/4 x 3 14/ inches — 38 slides; one wooden storage box

Collection is made up of three commercial sets of instructional black-and-white glass lantern slides (3 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches) that accompanied lectures on human anatomy for general audiences. They were produced sometime between 1888 and 1900. The first set (17 slides of about 50 in the original set) is titled "Human physiology, popularly explained," and illustrates aspects of the neurological, cardiovascular, muscular, and skeletal systems. The second series (18 slides of about 40) has as its title "The heart and its action." The third set (3 slides) offers microscopic views of liver and bone cells, and tooth structure. The images in the first set are based on illustrations by English author, scientist, and teacher William S. Furneaux. The sets were produced by York & Son, London, and distributed by a Glasgow optician, J. Lizars. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection is made up of three commercial sets of black-and-white glass lantern slides that accompanied lectures on human anatomy for general audiences. They were produced sometime between 1888 and 1900. The slides measure 3 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches (83x83 mm), and the glass plates are bound with black paper. Most of the slides have titles printed along the edges of the paper mounts.

The first set (17 slides out of about 50 in the original set) is titled Human physiology popularly explained, and illustrates aspects of neurological, cardiovascular, muscular, and skeletal systems. Among the slides of the thorax and its organs is an image showing the effects of the "tight lacing" on women's corsets. As indicated on the title slide, the detailed images in the set are based on illustrations by English author, teacher, and naturalist William S. Furneaux.

The second set (18 slides of about 40) has as its title The heart and its action, and illustrates all aspects of the cardiovascular system, including pulmonary and neurological anatomy. The illustrator is unknown.

The third set (3 slides) offers microscopic cross-sections of the human liver, bone, and tooth. The slides are part of a set called Microscopic gems: from the three kingdoms of nature.

All three lecture sets were produced in the late 19th century and perhaps into the first years of the 20th century by the firm York & Son, as evidenced by the presence on each slide of the London firm's "snake" trademark on a paper label.

These lecture sets were distributed widely by a number of optical and photographic firms. Two sets in this collection were sold through a Glasgow optician, J. Lizars, whose trademark label also appears on most of the slides in the first and third sets.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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York House records, 1966-1979 0.2 Linear Feet — 200 Items

York House was formed in 1961. Contains the records of York House, an independent living group for upperclassmen and underclassmen, at Duke University. Types of materials include newsletters, financial summaries, constitutions, and miscellaneous notes. Major subjects include residential living at Duke University, student life, alcohol use, and social activities among students. Materials are dated from 1966 to 1979.

Contains materials relating to the general governance and social activities of residents of York House, a Duke University Residence Hall.

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Yōko Hioki photograph album, around 1944-1954 0.7 Linear Feet — 1 item

Yōko Hioki was born about 1938 and was a resident of Ōmiya-shi, Saitama, Japan, near Tokyō. Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by Yōko Hioki primarily featuring her family and school. She was a 9th grader in 1953. There are 128 albumen and gelatin silver photographs ranging in size from 0.875 x 1.375-inches to 7.75 x 5.5-inches. The majority of the photographs are captioned. The first photograph in the album is a group family photograph taken sometime during the war, before the deployment of one of her family members. In addition, besides several pictures of Yōko, there are group and individual photographs of her school teachers and classmates, including reunion photographs, and many images of class field trips, including one trip to Nikko. There are also casual and formal individual and group images of Yōko's family, including those taken at a birthday party for her sister.

Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by Yōko Hioki primarily featuring her family and school. She was a 9th grader in 1953. There are 128 albumen and gelatin silver photographs ranging in size from 0.875 x 1.375-inches to 7.75 x 5.5-inches. The majority of the photographs are captioned. The first photograph in the album is a group family photograph taken sometime during the war, before the deployment of one of her family members. In addition, besides several pictures of Yōko, there are group and individual photographs of her school teachers and classmates, including reunion photographs, and many images of class field trips, including one trip to Nikko. There are also casual and formal individual and group images of Yōko's family, including those taken at a birthday party for her sister.

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Yehudit Shadur Mizrach papercut, 1975 2.4 Linear Feet — 1 item

Yehudit Shadur (1928-2011) pioneered the contemporary revival of the Jewish papercutting tradition. Collection comprises a papercut by Yehudit Shadur, entitled "Mizrach" (east wall marker), from the original in the Jewish National Museum and Archives, Israel. Cut blue paper; mounted on brown paper. 15.25 x 18.75 inches.

Collection comprises a papercut by Yehudit Shadur, entitled "Mizrach" (east wall marker), from the original in the Jewish National Museum and Archives, Israel. Cut blue paper; mounted on brown paper. 15.25 x 18.75 inches.

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Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers, 1889-1980 3.4 Linear Feet — 2550 items

Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt (née Rochelle, 1881-1980) was the daughter of Durham merchant Leander Sydney and Jeanette Stanley Rochelle. She was the fourth and final wife of Brodie L. Duke and a Durham landowner in her own right. The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt Papers date from 1889 to 1980 and chronicle the personal life of Wylanta as well as the business and financial transactions which she conducted as a prominent landowner in Durham. Materials include correspondence, photographs, and financial records.

The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers date from 1889 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials from the 1920s and 1930s. The collection chronicles Wylanta's familial and social life as well as her business dealings.

The Correspondence Series contains primarily incoming correspondence from Wylanta's sister, Hettie, nieces and nephews, and husbands as well as letters to and from a wide range of friends and Durham citizens. It contains a number of holiday greeting and sympathy cards, but does not contain any correspondence explicitly addressed to Brodie L. Duke.

The Clippings Series includes excerpts from newspaper columns and articles which Wylanta collected throughout her life. These clippings include the regular opinion column written by Wylanta's brother, Zapheus A. Rochelle, notes from the society section chronicling Wylanta and others' visits and travels, and coverage of Wylanta and Stayhorn's 1923 motor vehicle accident in Nice, France, as well as other political and social subjects.

The Financial Records Series encompasses deposit slips, receipts, dividend notices, ledgers, and correspondence evidencing Wylanta's business transactions. The series also contains information about her property ownership in the city of Durham.

The Miscellaneous Series contains assorted handwritten notes and printed commercial images.

The Photographs Series includes a number of portraits of Wylanta, her husbands and her family as well as numerous images of as-yet unidentified individuals. The materials include images of Wylanta in her wedding gowns, snapshots, and portraits. There are also a handful of images of places and an early x-ray of Wylanta's arm following an accident.

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Wyatt T. Dixon papers, 1850s-1987 3.6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2700 Items

The Wyatt T. Dixon Papers span the 1850s to 1987, although the bulk of the material dates from 1918 to the 1960s. The collection consists of diaries, vintage photographs, photomechanical prints, postcards, clippings, correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, printed materials, forms, military records, leaflets, and maps. The Photographs Series comprises the largest portion of the collection. The collection documents the history of Durham, N.C., the Dixon family, activities of the United States Army, American Expeditionary Forces, 30th Division, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, from 1917 to 1919; Durham, North Carolina; and Dixon's career as a journalist.

The World War I Series chronicles the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, which consisted primarily of men from Durham, N.C. Dixon's diaries chronicle the unit's movements and activities in the United States and Europe including England, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Battery C was involved in the Saint Michiel offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. The diaries describe camp life in the United States and Europe, including daily routines; camp conditions; outbreaks of measles and other medical situations; and the soldiers' personal recreational activities. The journey by ship to Europe is also described in detail, including the sale of food to the soldiers and the conditions on board. Civilian responses to the soldiers as they visited or traveled through towns and cities in America, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg are noted throughout the diaries. Dixon mentions a unit of African-American soldiers was at Mont Dore, France. There are some snapshot photographs of Battery C which Dixon probably created with his Kodak camera and some formal panoramic photographs of the entire unit. Letters written by Dixon and his family while he was in the Army are found in the Writings Series.

The Writings Series contains some personal correspondence and a diary, but the bulk of the series documents Dixon's career as a writer for newspapers published by the Durham Herald Company in Durham, N.C. In his column "How Times Do Change," Dixon described life in Durham and the surrounding area and the manner in which cityscapes and social life had changed over the past decades.

The Photographs Series consists primarily of photographs and documents social life and cityscapes in Durham, N.C. Images include buildings such as banks, businesses, cemeteries, churches, court houses, dams and power plants, hospitals, hotels and inns, plantations (abandoned), post offices, schools, and tobacco warehouses and factories. There are street scenes and aerial views. Many of these local images appear to have been collected by Dixon to illustrate his articles. Pictures of people include portraits of family members and friends, and candid scenes of groups engaged in social activities. There are images of events such as holiday celebrations and parades. Transportation, including trolleys, buses, fire fighting equipment and train depots, is also documented.

The Durham Printed Materials Series and the Miscellaneous Series include information about the City of Durham and Durham County, genealogical information about Dixon's family, and the minutes book of a social club for young men.

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WXDU records, 1963-2013 1.5 Linear Feet

WXDU, as a member of the Duke University Union, exists to inform, educate, and entertain both the students of Duke University and the surrounding community of Durham through quality progressive alternative radio programming. WXDU was founded in 1983 when former station WDUK-1600AM switched to a FM signal. Collection contains public records files, including correspondence and other materials related to FCC matters, program guides, clippings, a DJ handbook, and other materials. Materials range in date from 1977-2001.

Collection contains materials pertaining to FCC matters including correspondence, playlists, Music Forums notebooks containing comments by DJs and staff on station happenings, DJ manuals, event flyers and publicity, employment reports, insurance policies, license applications and renewal, public service announcements, program guides, board member and staff lists, clippings, and other materials concerning the operation of the station.

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W.W. Parleir papers, 1909-1937 1.8 Linear Feet — 9 Items

W.W. Parleir (d. 1937) was an outdoor advertising executive in Alabama during the 1910s through the 1930s. He worked at Theiss, Douglas & Ribble (Birmingham) and at Capital City Advertising (Montgomery), and was Chairman of the Outdoor Advertising Association of Alabama 1934-1937. The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Arranged alphabetically.

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W. W. Oxley letter, London, 1880, Feb. 10 1 item

ALS. Informs a Miss Buck that he must leave early and that she should postpone her visit.