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Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patteson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village." Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was a British actress, writer, and abolitionist. She was born into a theater family; her acting career spanned the years 1829-1868. Kemble acted to support herself, but she was most passionate about writing, and was an accomplished playwright, poet, and diarist. She married the Pierce Mease Butler, an American who subsequently inherited his family' plantations. After spending time in Georgia, Kemble became an abolitionist and later divorced her husband. In 1863, Kemble published her anti-slavery memoir, Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839, which is said to have influenced the British against supporting the Confederacy in the Civil War. Kemble's own family was divided on that issue, as her elder daughter sided with her mother, while her younger daughter returned to Georgia with her father. Frances Butler Leigh published Ten Years on a Georgia Plantation Since the War (1883) as a rebuttal to her mother's memoir. Kemble's success as a Shakespearean actress enabled her to buy a cottage in Lenox, Massachusetts. Her correspondent, Miss Patteson, is the daughter of Frances Duke Patteson, a niece of the poet Samuel Coleridge Taylor; the Lord Coleridge mentioned in the letter is John Duke Coleridge (1820-1894), the 2nd Lord Chief Justice of England. Bishop Patteson refers to Miss Patteson's sister, John Patteson (1827-1871), who became an Anglican martyr after being killed doing mission work in the Solomon Islands.

Autograph manuscript letter with postmarked envelope from the actress and writer Fanny Kemble in London to Miss Patteson in Andover, 10 May, 1889. Kemble thanks Miss Patterson for sending photographs, mentioning that she particularly values one of Bishop Patteson. She says she is "glad Lord Coleridge thought Lenox (Mass.) pretty. It has always seemed to me a charming mountain village."

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The Duke University Libraries Collection of Haggadot consists mainly of Passover Haggadot (singular: Haggadah) from the past 1000 years. The 436 Haggadot in the collection, which are found in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the Divinity School Library, Perkins Library, and Lilly Library, span 800 years (1200-2003), represent five continents (excluding only Australia and Antarctica), are written in several different languages (including Russian, Marathi, Italian, Yiddish, Ladino and Arabic), and were created for a variety of specific purposes. A majority of the Haggadot were published in the 20th century. A large number of the Haggadot are illustrated or illuminated while others contain only the text. Although the majority of the Haggadot in the collection were created by printing press, or other printing methods, Duke does own a number of limited edition facsimile editions of handwritten manuscripts. Most, but not all, of the Haggadot found in the Special Collections Library come from the Abram and Frances Pascher Kanof Collection of Jewish Art, Archaeology, and Symbolism. This guide does not include the Duke University Libraries' collection of microfilmed Haggadot. See the last paragraph of the Processing and Searching Note below for further information on searching for Haggadot in the library.

Since many of the Haggadot have similar titles (e.g. Hagadah shel Pesah yields 121 results), and to accommodate the variety of ways in which patrons might want to search for Haggadot, the entire collection has been arranged into three different series: Date List Series, Location List Series, and Purpose List Series. Each of these series contains the entire collection of Haggadot, but arranged according to different criteria. Therefore, the item with call number Haggadah Pam #106, an advertising Haggadah from 19th century New York, can be found in three places: 1) in the Date List under the 19th Century Subseries; 2) in the Location List under the United States Subseries; and 3) in the Purpose List under the Advertising Subseries.

The Date List Series is subdivided by century for Haggadot published from the 13th through the 19th centuries and by decade (e.g., 1910-1919) for those Haggadot created during the 20th and 21st centuries. The majority of the Haggadot (84%) are from the 20th century.

The Location List Series arranges the collection by the country where each Haggadah was created--usually where the item was printed--then by the date of creation. However, facsimile editions have been arranged by the place of their original creation. In these cases, the location where the facsimile was printed is identified in the description of each facsimile. This series is further arranged into subseries by country, including Algeria, Argentina, Austria, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Canada, Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Tunisia, and United States.

The Purpose List Series is further subdivided by the specific purpose for which each Haggadah was written. Most of the Haggadot were created for use at a Passover seder and thus are arranged into the General Subseries. These Haggadot are generally traditional in content and are meant to be used by anyone. Other purpose subseries include Advertising, Children, Christian, Denominations (of Judaism), Facsimiles, Fundraising, Kibbutz, Parody, and Resource.

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Earl J. Hamilton papers, 1350-1995 43.5 Linear Feet — 32,625 Items

Collection spans the years 1350 to 1995, and contains Earl J. Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The Earl J. Hamilton Papers span the years from 1350 to 1995, with Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. (Note: Early dates reflect original dates of primary sources rather than the dates on which the photocopies of these sources were created.) Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The collection includes not only extensive background notes for Hamilton's major books and articles, but also over 200 original legajos and other documents pertaining to Spanish trade and economic development, dating primarily from the 17th and 18th centuries. Other primary source materials from the 14th to the 18th centuries are also abundant (chiefly in the form of photostats and transcripts), including hundreds of copies of documents held by the Archivo del Banco de España, the Archivo Histórico Nacional, and other archives in Europe.

Photocopies and microfilm copies of items which belong to other libraries and archives may require permission of the owner institution to further reproduce or publish. Users making further copies for their own research do so at their own discretion. Before publication of any such material, it is the user's responsibility to identify the original source and obtain permission.

The collection also contains drafts and reprints of research papers, and numerous folders of academic and personal correspondence. Some documents in the collection are in French or Spanish.

Note that the early dates given in collection and series titles reflect the dates of the original primary source material that Hamilton used for his research, not the date when the photostat, photocopy or transcription was created.

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Journalist, of Charleston, S.C., and Versailles, France. The collection contains the papers of Francis Warrington Dawson, who was born Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler Morgan Dawson; and their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, better known as Warrington Dawson. The papers are primarily literary in character but also include many letters. Francis's papers are primarily autobiographical with information about his Civil War service, travels, courtship, and career. Also present are Morgan family papers describing social life in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., in the second half of the 19th century, especially during Reconstruction. Warrington Dawson materials document his work with the American Embassy in Paris and describes French life and politics. Also present is material from his work as director of French Research for Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., including copies (made from the originals at Colonial Williamsburg) of original documents pertaining to French participation in the American Revolution. Also included are copies of 18th century maps of North America, Williamsburg, Va., and positions of the French and American armies in New York and Virginia during the Revolutionary War.

The collection comprises the papers of Francis Warrington (Frank) Dawson (1840-1889), whose original name was Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler (Morgan) Dawson; and of their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, known as Warrington Dawson (1878-1962). The papers are primarily literary in character, with many editorials, newspaper writings, short stories, novels, articles, scrapbooks, diaries, reminiscences, and letters.

There are several series in the collection: Correspondence, Photographs, Scrapbooks, Writings, and Printed Materials document the family's activities in the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries. Warrington Dawson's research interests in French manuscripts, early American history, and family genealogy are also documented in the French Manuscripts and Research Files series.

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The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

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James Alexander Robertson papers, 1436?-1939 10 Linear Feet — 1840 Items

Librarian, archivist for State of Maryland, and historian, of Annapolis (Anne Arundel Co.), Md. Correspondence, notes, and works in manuscript and typescript concerning Philippine history, administrative problems and policies during the early years of American occupation, the Aglipay or Independent Filipino Church, Roman Catholicism, customs, geography, book manufacturing, education, José Rizal, Freemasonry, Filipino senators, and Katipunan of Filipino Secret Society. Many letters center around James Alfred Le Roy, authority on the Philippine Islands.

Correspondence, notes, and works in manuscript and typescript concerning Philippine history, administrative problems and policies during the early years of American occupation, the Aglipay or Independent Filipino Church, Roman Catholicism, customs, geography, book manufacturing, education, José Rizal, Freemasonry, Filipino senators, and Katipunan of Filipino Secret Society. Many letters center around James Alfred Le Roy, authority on the Philippine Islands.

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The Harold Jantz collection of early manuscripts, music manuscripts, and autograph albums, 1477-1905 and undated, is arranged by size (each item numbered) and includes the following noncontiguous subgroups: Autograph Albums (1633-1857 and undated), Early Music Manuscripts (1818-1874 and undated), Early Manuscript Prayerbooks (1744-1801 and undated), and Early Manuscript Songbooks (1712-1896 and undated). These subgroups are described more fully below.

The collection consists primarily of bound manuscripts, many illustrated, from the 15th through the early 20th centuries. Most materials are in German or English, with some materials in French, Hebrew, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Greek, or Latin. In addition to the above noted subgroups, the collection includes medical texts (nos. 28, 47, 77); historical chronicles, mostly German (nos. 25, 58, 59, 84, 127); and alchemical/astrological/occult treatises (nos. 9, 20, 53, 74, 114, 120, 122, 129, 148, 161, 165). Among the identified authors are Georg Fabricius (22), Edward Young (29), Sebastian Chiesa (33), Henry Marchant (49), Jacob Böhme (67), J.M. Firmenich (156), and Carl and Julius Dresel (117-119). Printed books, most with manuscript addenda, comprise approximately 10% of the collection.

The subgroup Autograph Albums (1633-1857 and undated) chiefly comprises bound volumes (guestbooks, Stammbücher) of 18th-and 19th-century German, English, and American provenance. These typically contain poems (many original), quotations, and maxims, as well as signatures. Many are illustrated and have laid-in mementoes. This group contains the following numbers from the main collection: 3 (J.C.Waechtler), 4 (Caspari), 5 and 6 (C.F.M. Timaus), 8 (a freemason), 11 ( E.D.), 60, 61, and 62 (Elizabeth J. Noble), 63 ( Miss Kate), 65 (Sarah T. Hopkins), 68 (Ebr. Denison), 69 ( Cornelia), 72 and 104 (Annie Mckay), 106 (Lucinda Olcott), 107 (Eliza Sabin), 108 (Emeline Ronnsville), 117 (Carl Dresel von Geisenheim) and 134.

The subgroup Early Music Manuscripts (1818-1874 and n.d) includes fife music, Spanish songs, a 19th century English tune book, and a vocal dialogue with text entitled Das Bauern Mädchen und der Stadt Junge, as well as works by Harriette Gould Bark, Johann Adolf Hasse, Georg Philipp Telemann, and Isaac C. Day. It comprises numbers 1, 7, 10, 48, 71, 116, 126, 136, and 141 of the main collection.

The subgroup Early Manuscript Prayerbooks (1744-1801 and undated) consists chiefly of 18th-century Roman Catholic prayerbooks and devotional exercises (including 3 copies of Crönung Mariae) in German and Latin. Many are illustrated. It includes numbers 17, 27, 30, 31, 34, 66, 81, 94, 101, and 131-133 of the main collection.

The subroup Early Manuscript Songbooks, (1712-1896 and undated) includes both sacred (chiefly Roman Catholic) and secular song texts without music. The collection contains some German hymns. Items 13, 24, 36, 73, 86, 87, and 139 of the main collection comprise this group. Numbers 86 and 87 are 19th-century transcriptions from the 16th-century Heidelberger Liederhandschrift (Cod. Pal. 343) and Wernigerode Liederhandschrift Zy 15.

Some items from the Jantz Collection have been cataloged separately. To locate these, search the catalog under author: Harold Jantz Collection (David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library)

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In 1892, Dr. Stephen B. Weeks, a professor of history at Trinity College, organized the Trinity College Historical Society. The goals of the Society were to collect, arrange, and preserve written materials and artifacts illustrative of the history of North Carolina and the South, and to promote the study of Southern history through lectures and publications. The Society benefited from the strong leadership of two history professors, John Spencer Bassett and William Kenneth Boyd. They made wide appeals for donations of historical materials and maintained a museum to house these relics. The meetings of the Society, held several times each year, provided a forum at which students and faculty could read their research papers and discuss their ideas. The best of these papers were published, from 1897 to 1956, in the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society. The collection includes historical notes about Trinity College and the Society, correspondence, meeting announcements, administrative files, publications, speeches, and artifacts. Materials range in date from [1492?] to 1981. English.

The collection includes a wide variety of material concerning the Trinity College Historical Society and ranges in date from [1492?] to 1981. The material includes historical notes, about Trinity College and the Trinity College Historical Society and includes transcribed notes, rosters, lists of donations, records, reviews of activities, stationary, and clippings. The correspondence and meeting announcements, [1926]-1981, includes general correspondence about the business of the Trinity College Historical Society and announcements and publicity for upcoming meetings. The administrative files, 1892-1978, includes minutes of the meetings held by the Trinity College Historical Society, and files kept by the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of the Society. Publications, 1897-1979, include copies of the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society and newsletters published from 1978-1979. Speeches, 1904-[1980], include notes, original manuscripts, and copies of speeches and papers presented at the meetings of the Trinity College Historical Society. The artifacts, [1492?]-1918, include items collected from all aspects of American life. These relics range from coins and medals, to wooden shoe soles, to a piece of what was thought to be Christopher Columbus's flag.

In January 2007, Box 20 and folders 170 and 173 were transferred to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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Harold Jantz papers, 1500-1989 30.5 Linear Feet — About 60,000 items

Noted professor of German literature and collector of German baroque literature. Professional correspondence, note cards, research and teaching files, essays, offprints and reprints of articles by Jantz and scholars associated with him, and other printed material. Notable items are manuscripts about Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and his FAUST, and manuscripts related to Francis Daniel Pastorius's Bee-Hive. Accession (2008-0159) consists largely of Jantz's correspondence and letters, 1978-1985. Also included are exam blue books, some miscellaneous printed material, and a scrapbook of chromolithographs dating from the Victorian period. The blue books contain writings by Jantz, some relating to Francis Pastorius, and are arranged numerically.

Professional correspondence, note cards, research and teaching files, essays, offprints and reprints of articles by Jantz and scholars associated with him, and other printed material. Notable items are manuscripts about Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and his FAUST, and manuscripts related to Francis Daniel Pastorius's Bee-Hive. Accession (2008-0159) consists largely of Jantz's correspondence and letters, 1978-1985. Also included are exam blue books, some miscellaneous printed material, and a scrapbook of chromolithographs dating from the Victorian period. The blue books contain writings by Jantz, some relating to Francis Pastorius, and are arranged numerically.

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John Jay TePaske papers, 1500s-1988 11.9 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

The following overview was compiled almost completely from the 1999 accession of the TePaske Papers, although the 1993 accession contains more of the same types of materials.

This collection consists of summaries of the fiscal records of the royal treasuries of key regions in colonial Spanish America. Represented in these records are present-day Mexico (New Spain), Peru, Upper Peru (Bolivia), Rio de la Plata (Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Chile, Ecuador, and Cuba. The scope of the records is broad and comprehensive, offering in most cases virtually complete series of fiscal data for the colonial era, from the sixteenth century through the early decades of the nineteenth century.

Variously known as sumarios, cartas cuentas, tanteos or relaciones juradas, the account summaries list all the revenues and expenditures in the account period for each particular treasury district. The royal treasuries (cajas) collected taxes and made disbursements. Tax receipts (cargo) included levies on silver production, sales and port taxes, Indian tribute, and royal monopolies on commodities, (tobacco, mercury, stamped legal paper) and legal transactions. Expenditures (data) included the salaries and upkeep of the district's royal bureaucracy, defense expenses, and support for the missionary activities of the church. Surplus revenue generally found its way into the viceroyalty's coffers to help defray costs related to governmental activities. Each summary synthesizes an account period's worth of transactions in each particular caja or treasury. As such, these documents provide a window into both the fiscal organization of the Spanish empire and the fiscal state of each district, and also help elucidate the diversity of economic life in the various treasury districts.

Most of these records come from the Archivo General de Indias in Sevilla, Spain. Originally organized into bundles or legajos, the account summaries were scattered in various sections of the Sevilla repository. The Contaduría section holds most of the accounts related to the period prior to the mid-eighteenth century. After that, the records are dispersed within the various Audiencia sections for each jurisdiction. For example, the records for the Lima treasury appear in the Audiencia of Lima section of the archive, and so on. The following list offers a broad overview of the location of the holdings in the Archivo General de Indias:

Peru: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 1679-1873); After 1760: Audiencia of Lima (legajos 38-50); Audiencia of Cuzco

Upper Peru: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 1795-1850); After 1760: Audiencia of Charcas (legajos 627-671); Audiencia of Lima (legajos 1301 and 1415)

Chile: Up to 1750: Contaduría (legajos 1854-1858, and 1860); After 1750: Audiencia of Chile (legajos 339-351, 395-415)

Rio de la Plata: Contaduría (legajos 1845, 1846, 1884, 1886A, 1887A, 1894A, 1894B); Audiencia of Buenos Aires (legajos 393-399, 401-409, 442, 445-446, 448, 450-451, 453-455, 457-458, 460-462, 464-466, 484, 619-620, 701-703); Audiencia of Lima (legajo 1416)

Ecuador: Contaduría (legajos 1377, 1539-1540, 1576-1577); Audiencia of Quito (legajos 140-141, 173, 165, 407, 413, 415-429, 469-475, 477, and 497)

Mexico: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 677-940); After 1760: Audiencia of Mexico (legajos 2027-3198); Audiencia of Guadalajara (legajos 436-496)

These archival materials were originally collected for a collaborative research project designed to compile comprehensive fiscal data on the former Spanish American colonies. Except for the Cuban accounts, the majority of these sources have already been published in book format as the list below attests:

A. Mexico (New Spain) and Mexico City:

John J. TePaske and Herbert S. Klein. Ingresos y egresos de la Real Hacienda de Nueva España. 2 vols. México, D.F.: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, 1986-1988.

John J. TePaske and José y Mari Luz Hernández Palomo. La Real Hacienda de Nueva España: la Real Caja de México, 1576-1816. México: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, SEP, Departamento de Investigaciones Históricas, Seminario de Historia Económica, 1976.

B. Peru, Upper Peru (Bolivia), Rio de la Plata (Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Chile, and eighteenth-century Ecuador:

John J. TePaske and Herbert S. Klein. The Royal Treasuries of the Spanish Empire in America. 4 vols. Durham: Duke University Press, 1982-1990.

(Note: The fourth volume in the series on Ecuador was compiled by professors Alvaro Jara and John J. TePaske.)

We strongly encourage researchers to first read the introductions to the published accounts before consulting these records. In the introduction to each volume, researchers will find useful background information about the development of the royal treasury system in the districts for which there is fiscal data. The introductions also concisely explain the organization and operation of the treasuries, the structure of the account summaries and the terminology used in them, the use of multiple units of currency, and other important details about bookkeeping in colonial times.

Although the published account summaries faithfully replicate the originals, there are slight variations. The authors made minor changes to make the data more manageable. Monetary units were rounded off and the entries on both the income and expenditure sides of the accounts were standardized and arranged in alphabetical order. For more information on these and other methodological issues, please see the introduction to the volumes.

The TePaske collection consists of colonial Spanish American fiscal records in both microfilm and print. The printed materials are duplicates of the originals in microform.

Glossary:

caja real = royal treasury

cargo = income, revenue

data = expenditure, disbursement

legajo = bundle of documents

ramo = income/expenditure category

sumario = accounts, account summary (also carta cuenta, tanteo, relación jurada)

tesorero = treasury official (also contador)

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History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated 16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Jane L. Berdes papers, 1525-1993 79.5 Linear Feet — 46,000 Items

The Jane L. Berdes Collection (1525-1993) has as its focal points the four Venetian welfare institutions known as the Ospedali Grandi and their role as providers of musical training for girls and women. The inclusive dates for the collection begin with the dates of primary materials Berdes collected and extend through her lifetime. The collection consists primarily of Berdes's research notes and materials on the Ospedali Grandi, and photocopies or microfilms of primary sources, including musical scores in manuscript and printed editions. It also contains correspondence, photographs, recordings and printed materials. Berdes identified the maestri of the Ospedali Grandi, the music performed, and the names of over 800 women who were members of the cori , but relatively little is known about them individually with the exception of Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen. In addition, the collection features general materials pertaining to other women in music throughout history. The user is advised that some photocopies are unattributed and, where Berdes did not indicate composer or author, no attempt has been made to provide one. The archive contains very few of Berdes's personal papers.

The bulk of the collection is found in the Research Notes and Materials Series, which contains information gathered in preparation for her books on the Ospedali Grandi and Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen (MLS). The heart of this series is the Ospedali Grandi data designated as "Raw Materials," which contains information culled from primary sources and arranged by subject. Most subseries provide documentation for Raw Materials, including copies of primary and secondary sources, pictures of instruments and iconography, and a bibliography. Similar materials pertaining to Sirmen are here also, as is general information about women in music.

The Music Series contains manuscripts and early printed editions of music performed at the Ospedali Grandi in the form of photocopies or microfilms (printed scores in modern edition are grouped with Printed Materials). There is particular emphasis on the compositions of Sirmen, including some recordings of her music. Works by Bertoni, Galuppi, Hasse, Jommelli, Vivaldi and others are grouped alphabetically by composer. The Correspondence Series contains both general professional correspondence and "Thesis Correspondence," that is letters from other scholars, libraries, archives, museums, and churches in Italian, French and English concerning the Ospedali Grandi and Sirmen. The Miscellaneous Series includes Berdes's other publications on both musical and nonmusical subjects, music criticism, course notes from classes she taught or attended, and memorabilia from her years at Oxford University. A selection of pertinent reference books from Berdes's library is found in the Printed Material Series, as are some libretti, and musical scores by Vivaldi in modern edition.

The user is advised to consult Box #1 for an introduction to the contents of the collection. It contains a copy of Berdes's book Women Musicians in Venice: Musical Foundations, 1525-1855; two copies of her dissertation, entitled Musical Life at the Four Ospedali Grandi, 1525-1855; two binders described by the donor as "the road map to the collection" and a videotaped review of its contents prepared by Berdes.

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Josiah C. Trent papers, 1536-1961 and undated, bulk 1938-1951 6.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 1 oversize folder — approx. 1800 items — approximately 1800 items

U.S. thoracic surgeon, rare book and manuscript collector. The papers consist mostly of correspondence, printed material, photographs, and lecture notes taken during medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency, and notes and drafts for published and unpublished research and articles. The bulk of the material documents Dr. Trent's activities and publications as collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. There are folders of photographic reproductions of medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th century to the 20th century, whose content is reflected in the earliest dates for the collection. There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his rare book and manuscripts collection to the Duke Medical Center Library, along with condolences and other items related to his wife, Mary Duke Biddle Trent. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Josiah C. Trent papers consist mostly of correspondence, photographs, research files, and notes and drafts of published and unpublished research and articles. Many of these materials concern Dr. Trent's activities and publications as a collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. The collection also includes printed materials, photographs, a card file - possibly of his personal library, and lecture notes taken during his medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency. The Writings series reveals his wide interests in surgery, medicine in general, the humanities, and medical history.

There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his large rare book, artifact, and manuscript collection to the Duke Medical Center Library. Early dates in the collection refer to the content of reproductions of 16th-19th century medical illustrations rather than their dates of reproduction.

The correspondence, found in the Subject Files folders, dates mostly from the 1940s and 1950s, documenting Dr. Trent's rare book and manuscript collecting, and his involvement with various professional organizations and his association and friendships with prominent figures in various fields: medical history - John Fulton, Henry Sigerist, W. W. Francis; book collecting - Henry Schuman; Duke University - Wilburt Davison, Lenox D. Baker. Some folders contain an index of the contents.

There is also some information concerning Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Dr. Trent's wife, who was instrumental in facilitating the support of the history of medicine collections at Duke.

The collection also contains several hundred photographic prints and negatives reproducing medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th to 20th centuries. The earliest dates in the collection refer to the content of the images, rather than their reproduction by Dr. Trent, Duke Medical Library staff, and others, in the mid-20th century.

The files were kept in Dr. Trent's medical office and contain relatively few items which pertain to his private life. Items of a more personal nature may be found in the James H. and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Family Papers in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s 50 Linear Feet — about 850 items

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Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects related to the history of medicine, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, urology, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models and figurines; and other objects such as apothecary jars, cupping glasses, infant feeders, a bas-relief memento mori, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes and stethoscopes, dating from the 17th to the 20th century. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include physician's medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); clinical equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models; and art objects such as apothecary jars, a bas-relief memento mori, a marble skull, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes, from a small monocular "flea glass" to mid-20th century models. Other early medical instruments and supplies include amputation saws, bleeding bowls, cupping glasses, hypodermic needles, infant and invalid feeders, lancets, opthalmoscopes, pill rollers, stethoscopes, syringes, and other items. A more unusual item - and one of the larger pieces - is an adult walker made of wood, dating perhaps to the 19th century or earlier.

There is also a large collection of early anatomical and diagnostic human models from China and continental Europe, in the shape of small, intricately detailed manikins. Most are made from ivory. Some feature removable anatomical parts, and female figures often include a removable fetus. There is also a model illustrating acupuncture points. Other instructional artifacts include glass slides used in medical school lectures.

Most of these objects were photographed by library staff; at a later time, digital images of almost all of the objects in the collection were added to the online Duke University Historical Images in Medicine database, linked in this collection guide. Many of the original black-and-white photographic prints are filed in the History of Medicine Picture File collection. See the Related Materials section in this collection guide for links to these resources.

Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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The materials comprising the British Correspondence and Miscellany Collection are dated from 1556 to 1972 (bulk 1740-1890). The papers are arranged into the following series: Correspondence, 1556-1972 and undated; Subject Files, 1699-1902 and undated; Pictures, 1795-1921 and undated; and Miscellaneous Material, 1814-1836 and undated An artificial collection, the papers are, for the most part, unrelated by provenance. The collection consists chiefly of correspondence, and topics include numerous political events and activities of the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries in Great Britain and the colonies (particularly India and Africa).

The Correspondence Series includes numerous letters to and from British notables. Among the major correspondents represented are: the 8th Duke of Argyll, the 1st and 2nd Barons Auckland, Charles Bradlaugh, John Bright; Robert Brownrigg; George Canning, John Wilson Croker, the 1st Earl of Durham, John Foster, the 1st Baron Dover, George Joachim Goschen, John Hay, the 3rd Marquess Lansdowne, W.E.H. Lecky, Captain John Lenty, the 1st Earl of Liverpool, the 3rd Earl of Lucan, William Melbourne, Lord Broderick Midleton, Viscount Milner, David Christie Murray, Thomas Nimmo, Baron Northcote, Pierce O'Mahoney, the 3rd Viscount Palmerston, the 1st Baronet Pollock, George Rose, the 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, William Sheowring, John Deas Thompson, the 1st Duke of Wellington, William Wilberforce, and Edward Wodehouse.

Among the items in the Correspondence Series are a copy of John Bright's 1851 speech entitled "Papal Aggression" (Bright correspondence); material regarding the Horseguards (Brownrigg correspondence); a testimonial to the character of Sir Francis Burdett written by Lady Hester Stanhope (Burdett correspondence); a letter regarding Wellington's correspondence concerning a transport ship wrecked in the Tagus during his last Iberian campaign (Canning correspondence); letters from David Dundas, including two accompanying circulars (1804 and 1805) from the War Office (Dundas correspondence); and correspondence (and accompanying transcripts) between King George I and M. Braconnier (1709) concerning the King's inability to send a detachment large enough to oppose the French along the borders of the Rhone and Lake Geneva (George I correspondence). Other items include correspondence relating to George Henry's mission in Nyasaland (Henry correspondence); material concerning the cargo ship "The Sea Witch" (Lenty correspondence); correspondence regarding Marsden-Smedley's unsuccessful campaign for Parliament in 1910 (Marsden-Smedley correspondence); and Wellesley's transcript of a testimonial to the character of Charles Wyatt written by the Governor General of India (Wellesley correspondence). The Murray correspondence includes handwritten biographical notes and a printed review (1908) of David Christie Murray's Reflections.

Papers in the Subject Files Series concern a wide range of political, military, and economic matters. They include an anonymous account (1743) of the battle of Dettingen (in French); papers (1856-1860 and undated) relating to the raising of ships at Sebastopol during the Crimean War; a collection of letters from various correspondents concerning decimal currency (1856-1869); papers concerning Newfoundland fisheries (1901-1902); and a document pertaining to the impressment of sailors (1745).

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Guido Mazzoni pamphlet collection, 1572-1946, bulk 1750-1940 860 Linear Feet — 1626 boxes — 49,648 items

This collection of print materials, many of them rare and ephemeral, was assembled over many decades by Guido Mazzoni, an Italian Senator, Dante scholar, professor, and bibliophile. The approximately 49,648 pieces span the years 1572 through 1946, with the bulk dating from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries. Topics range widely and include Italian politics, particularly the rise of Socialism and Fascism; Italian humanities, especially poetry, theater, and opera; Dante studies; patriotic writings, including some by Mussolini and others in his regime; and the history and context of both World Wars. Popular literary and cultural serials abound, many with writings by noted authors, including women writers. Given Mazzoni's background in academics, his friendships with publishers, and his residence in Padova and Firenze, many of the authors are Jewish. Many of the pieces were sent to Mazzoni from former students or colleagues and are inscribed to him. Mazzoni collected many rare pieces from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; broadsides from Napoleonic, Medicean, and Borbonic Italian regions are numerous. Formats represented in the collection include: pamphlets, offprints, clippings, full-issue newspapers (many from the Piedmont), libretti, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, political broadsides, epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one handmade photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with map inserts. About 80 percent of the material is in the Italian language: other common languages include Latin, French, English, German. There are also some publications in Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages. The largest and most developed subject areas, with thousands of pamphlets in each series, relate to Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the early 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from its earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscans to the rise of Fascism in the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections relate to Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially opera and popular music; art history; and religious history. The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented by the collection are too numerous to mention in this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed in this guide. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials on Dante Alighieri and his works number in the thousands.

The Guido Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection spans the years 1572 through 1946, with approximately 46,825 pieces in the collection. The bulk of the material, chiefly in the Italian language, dates from the mid-eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Formats represented include: pamphlets, libretti, clippings, newspapers, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, broadsides (some very large), epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with maps enclosed.

About 80 percent of the materials is in the Italian language, though other languages are represented, most notably Latin, French, English, German, Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages.

This guide offers access to brief descriptive records for each item. Hundreds of pamphlets, particularly the epithalamia, were described more fully in the library's online catalog and can be found by using the subject keywords "provenance" and "mazzoni guido." A full set of more than 30 volumes held by the library offers photocopied images of Mazzoni's handwritten catalog slips for subject and name access to the pamphlets.

Guido Mazzoni assembled his library in several ways. He purchased many items from rare book dealers and other book sellers in Italy, particularly in Padua, Florence, and Bologna. His colleagues and former students sent him thousands of offprints, extracts, and small volumes of their work, most of them inscribed to Mazzoni. He accumulated materials from his work in the Italian Senate, most notably in areas of education, politics, and the humanities. He also acquired either by purchase or by inheritance entire libraries of academic colleagues, some of whom became his relatives by marriage. Some of these names include Giuseppe Chiarini, his father-in-law, and Raffaello Fornaciari.

The importance of the Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection primarily lies in its contribution to the fields of European and Italian studies. It is a broad but selective bibliography - put into material form, as it were - of nineteenth-century European culture and its transition into the twentieth century. The intellectual arrangement assigned to the pamphlets by library staff places them into thirty-one subject areas.

The largest and most developed subject areas, each represented by thousands of pamphlets, are: Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from their earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscan period to the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections include Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially popular music and opera; art history; and religious history. Many individual items, particularly literary publications, are ephemeral, rare, and difficult to locate in the United States and even in Italy.

The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented in the collection are too numerous for this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed below. Suffice it to say that virtually every important poet, dramatist, writer, historian, and political figure of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is represented, and, perhaps more importantly, many minor authors and political figures of those eras whose works are now difficult to find. In addition, prominent scientific individuals of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries are represented in the collection. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials relating to every topic in Dante studies number in the thousands.

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Peruvian collection, 1583-1892 6 Linear Feet — circa 47 Items; 21 Volumes

Collection contains papers relating to Peru, roughly falling into three groups centering around commerce and industry, literary activities, and religious and social history. Includes papers (1786-1787) containing information on the mining of mercury; poems of Juan de Valle y Caviedes in 17th century script; poems by Antonio de Solís; one volume of Documentos históricos, collected by Manuel de Odriozola; three Documentos literarios from contemporary publications, among them a compilation of the papers of Peruvian viceroys and others (1580-1818); a paper relating to witchcraft and idolatry in Peru; papers (1772-1773) of the Provincial Council at Lima, containing the core of the debate within the Catholic Church on the modernization of learning which Charles III attempted to foist upon the empire; a copy of the proceso of Mariano Tupac Amaro; and material relating to politics and the industrial development of Peru and neighboring countries during the 19th century.

This collection of heterogeneous material, generally relating to the colonial period of Peru, falls roughly into three groups centering around commerce and industry, literary activity, and religious and social history. Several manuscripts in the first group contain information on the mining of mercury, 1786-1787. Literary materials include the poems of Caviedes in the seventeenth century script useful for correcting errors in the copies published by Ricardo Palma; a copy of iconoclastic and mysterious poems by Antonio de Solís; one cuaderno of the Documentos históricos collected by Manuel de Odriozola; and three Documentos literarios from contemporary publications. Among the Items relating to religion and social history are a compilation of the papers of Peruvian viceroys and others, 1580-1818; an expediente concerning witchcraft and idolatry in Peru; original papers on the modernization of learning which Charles III attempted to impose upon the empire; copy of the proceso of Mariano Tupac Amaru; and a booklet, 1794, describing the founding and development of Quito, Ecuador.

Some of these Items, formerly the property of Manuel de Odriozola, the Peruvian literary historian who brought together this collection, are listed in the Cátalogo de la Biblioteca Peruana Propiedad de Dn. Francisco Perez de Velasco (Lima, 1918). Rubén Vargas Ugarte, S. J., describes some of these manuscripts in Manuscritos Peruanos en las Bibliotecas de América (Buenos Aires, 1945, pp. 230-243) which is volume IV of his Biblioteca Peruana (Lima, 1935- ). John Tate Lanning, James B. Duke Professor of History, also mentioned these manuscripts in his article "The Hispanic Collection" published in Gnomon, Essays for the Dedication of the William R. Perkins Library (Duke Unlversity, April 15 and 16, 1970).

This guide to the collection is the result of extensive recataloging in which, for the first time, considerable attention has been given to analyzing the content of the manuscripts. The descriptions of many of the manuscripts have been enlarged, and, in some cases, author and title information has been changed or refined. Many entries have been added to the card catalog based upon these new descriptions. Copies of these cards have been included in this guide in order to provide additional means of access to the contents of the collection.

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Document on folded parchment, written in French, from Maltese branch of Knights Hospitaller. Content currently unknown. More modern stamp in blue ink on document indicates that the document was in the "Archives de l'Ordre Malthe."
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Alexander Weinmann papers, 1614-1986 14 Linear Feet — 7,000 Items

The collection reflects Weinmann's extensive research in the history of Viennese music publishing and is a resource for study of publishing firms in Vienna as well as documenting Weinmann's bibliographical research. The Music Series includes title pages and parts of arrangements, focusing on Viennese publishers and composers, including Georg Druschetzky, Joseph Haydn, Johann Baptist Vanhal, Johann Josef Rösler, and Ferdinand Kauer, as well as Johann Sebastian Bach. Included in the Writings and Speeches Series are manuscript drafts of works related to Weinmann's bibliographies (published in the Beiträge zur Geschichte des Alt-Weiner Musikverlages) as well as bio-bibliographical and historical works. The series also documents Weinmann's study of 19th century Viennese publishing firms including Artaria and Company, Giovanni Cappi, Leopold Kozeluch, Franz Anton Hoffmeister, Carlo and Pietro Mechetti, Tranquillo Mollo, Ignaz Sauer, Johann Traeg, and Thaddäus Weigl. Series includes research by Weinmann's brother, Ignaz Weinmann, on Franz Schubert.

The Research Notes Series consists of bibliographic references and citations, information about works and plate numbers; Weinmann's contributions to the Répertoire international des sources musicales; and Wiener Zeitung references. The Series also concerns Weinmann's work as an editor of the sixth edition of the Chronologisch-thematisches Verzeichnis sämtlicher Tonwerke Wolfgang Amadé Mozarts. Anthony van Hoboken, Willi Boskovsky, Franz Giegling, Anton Fietz, and Arthur Fiedler are among primary correspondents in the collection. Weinmann also collected letters (originals and copies) from persons and publishers he studied, including J.P. Gotthard, Johann Strauss, Franz Xaver Süssmayr, and Tobias Haslinger.

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Hieraume Peyre (or Hierosme Peire) was a French architect-builder, originally from Saint-Chamond, who lived and worked in the area around Saint-Etienne, Isère, Grenoble, and Tullins. Sketchbook and commonplace book compiled over two decades (approximately 1620-1640) by the French architect-builder Hieraume Peyre. The manuscript is in ink and color [14.9 x 19.3 cm], (187) ff., with some leaves showing an earlier pagination that might indicate the loss of some leaves, but with no clear interruption of continuity in the text, copiously illustrated (265 of 375 pages carry some form of illustration, and 161 of these are full-page). Bound in early tinted vellum. The manuscript provides information on both the practical and theoretical concerns of early-modern engineers and architectural practitioners.

Sketchbook and commonplace book compiled over two decades (approximately 1620-1640) by the French architect-builder Hieraume Peyre. The manuscript is in ink and color [14.9 x 19.3 cm], (187) ff., with some leaves showing an earlier pagination that might indicate the loss of some leaves, but with no clear interruption of continuity in the text, copiously illustrated (265 of 375 pages carry some form of illustration, and 161 of these are full-page). Bound in early tinted vellum. The manuscript provides information on both the practical and theoretical concerns of early-modern engineers and architectural practitioners: Peyre made numerous drawings of carpentry designs for vaults and towers he worked on, brickwork and ashlar masonry patterns, ornamental motifs for stonework, designs for stone intarsia floors, balusters, coffered ceilings, among others. He also engaging closely with printed architectural treatises, for example, with a French translation of the Spaniard Diego de Sagredo's (c. 1480-1528) Medidas del Romano, from which Peyre copied several woodcuts illustrating the classical orders, classical proportions, masonry profiles, and more.

In addition to his illustrations of architectural matter, Peyre includes recipes for "cold' cement, hydraulic "ciment chaud" for work on fountains, varnish, "false marble," oil paints, gilding, plasters, and adhesives, and provides designs for lathes used in turning. Extensive sections on horology and surveying are practical, with Peyre's attention to vertically mounted mural sundials reflecting his specialty as a builder of the towers where such timekeeping devices were placed.

Peyre also provides riddles, poetry, prayers (one in Italian), illustrations of various inventions (for example, relating to wells, the manufacture of wheat, Jacob's staff, among others), botanical and entomological specimens, heraldic illustrations, and numerous drawings of sacred and secular figures (including Pope Paul V, and François de Paule, the founder of the Order of Minims), labyrinths, cityscapes, religious iconography, armor, grotesques, and both real and mythical beasts. He mentions events dated with the years 1620, 1623, 1624, 1630, 1634, 1636, and 1637 and occasionally provides personal details from his life, including a note on the birth of a son, Jehan, on 16 December 1630, and the infant's untimely death two months later.

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The Duke University History of Medicine Collections acquire, preserve, interpret, and make available for research and instruction, materials documenting the history of medicine, biomedical science, health and disease in the global context of the Western medical tradition. The collection was assembled by Duke Medical Center Library staff, and contains newspapers and other oversize print materials related to the history of medicine. The earliest date comes from a modern reproduction in black-and-white of an anatomical treatise from 1628. Newspaper issues from the 18th and 19th centuries carry advertisements related to physicians' services, medical practices, and medicinal products. Single sheets from the London Illustrated News concern the activities of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, 1855-1856, and are illustrated with large black-and-white engravings; one issue reproduces a piece of music with verses praising Nightingale. The items were acquired from various sources as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The collection contains newspapers and other oversize print materials related to the history of medicine. The earliest date comes from a modern reproduction in black-and-white of an anatomical treatise from 1628. Newspaper issues from the 18th and 19th centuries carry advertisements related to physicians' services, medical practices, and medicinal products. Single sheets from the London Illustrated News concern the activities of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War, 1855-1856, and are illustrated with large black-and-white engravings; one issue reproduces a piece of music with verses praising Nightingale. The items were acquired from various sources as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Clopton Family papers, 1629-1915 (bulk 1775-1897) 77 Linear Feet — 11,916 Items

Family correspondence and miscellaneous papers of four generations of the Clopton family and three generations of the Wallace family, centering in Virginia. The material ranges in date from 1629-1915 (bulk 1775-1897).

Family correspondence and miscellaneous papers of four generations of the Clopton family and three generations of the Wallace family, centering in Virginia. The earlier papers are genealogical records. Papers of John Clopton, Virginia legislator and U.S. Representative contain comments on politics in the Jeffersonian Republican Party, the Continental Congress, Jay's treaty, the Alien and Sedition acts, the Embargo act, and American relations with France. Letters to son, John Bacon Clopton, Virginia judge, relate to the operation of a plantation in New Kent County. Correspondence of Charles Montriou Wallace, Sr., a Richmond merchant, includes accounts of an overland journey to California (1849) and subsequent residence there, Reconstruction, and Virginia politics. Of interest also are Civil War letters from William Izard Clopton. Letters from a Richmond commission firm concern wartime and postwar business conditions. The collection also includes several memorandum books, scrapbooks, account books, legal casebooks, journals of trips to California, Texas and England, records of an unidentified temperance society, and financial records of a teacher.

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Fourteen single-sheet printed documents issued by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargoes, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning bubonic plague. Cities include Venice, Brindisi, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, and Trieste. Almost all bear small woodcuts chiefly of patron saints and coats of arms, and official seals and stamps. Handwritten annotations include dates, itineraries, and, in the case of maritime shipping, the names of ships and owners. Some note the type of cargo and a few list the names of crew members, with age, stature, and other details. Most are in Italian but several also include some Latin. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Fourteen single-sheet printed documents, issued from 1630 to 1818 by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargo, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning plague. Most are in Italian, but several also include some Latin.

Nine of these bills of health originated in Venice, with others from Brindisi, Guastalla, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, Segna, San Martino, and Trieste. They range in size from 6 x 8 1/4 to 12 x 16 1/2 inches. Almost all bear one or more small woodcuts such as patron saints and coats of arms; blindstamps and seals are also often present.

Typical handwritten content on the front and sometimes back of the sheet gives the name of the ship's owner and his ship, the ship's itinerary, number of containers ("Colli"), and type of cargo. A few of the documents also include lists of crew members, with names, ages, and stature. A few terms of interest that appear include "lazzeretto," indicating a place of quarantine, and "epizootico," a medical term for a non-human epidemic or agent. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.
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Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995 112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items

Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

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Collection comprises a 35-page memorandum book maintained by the Haulsey family of London, England, from 1646-1846. The memoranda usually record marriages, births, christenings, deaths, and burials, but there are also separate notes on family genealogy, as well as a few notes on land tenancy transfers, and money lent and received. There is one record regarding numbers of silver trays and candlesticks. Volume entries are handwritten on varying types of paper, and are not in chronological order. The volume also features an embroidered binding and a metal-clasp closure with initials G.W. (one clasp is missing). The embroidery includes images of day and night, as well as a dog, monkey, church, house, windmill, swallow, snail, and various plants and flowers.
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Jonathan Kennon Smith papers, 1649-1988 4 Linear Feet — 8 boxes, 477 items

This collection holds miscellaneous papers (192 items; dated 1649-1971) including originals and copies of letters, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Pearson, Smith, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas; letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tenn.; copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regt., C.S.A.; anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; Melton family genealogy; and Smith family albums. A later addition (283 items, dated 1774-1986) includes information pertaining to the genealogy of several related families (including the Thompson and Wyly families, as well as information on the descendants of Col. Samuel and Mary Webb Smith). Includes printed works on genealogy and other topics compiled by Emma C. C. Brown and Jonathan K. T. Smith (primarily Smith). Also includes: correspondence; legal documents; copies of church records; clippings; writings about the history of Benton County, Tenn., and some of its citizens and communities; photographs; printed and other material on Camden, Tenn.; copy of the diary of Anne William Smith; copy of a portrait of Anne William Smith by Gustavus Grunewald (1847-1848); a recording entitled The Remembrance Pilgrimage about the Smith family of Nymcock, Tenn.; A Century with St. Mark's: An Informal History by Clara L. Cape; and an extensive biographical sketch on Col. Maurice Smith.

This collection is largely genealogical in nature and holds miscellaneous papers of Jonathan Kennon Thompson Smith including originals and copies of letters, papers, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Smith, Pearson, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas. The Smith family descended through Maurice Smith (1801-1871) of Person County, North Carolina who later moved to Fayette County, Tennessee in 1831, and finally to Dallas County, Arkansas in 1843.

In addition to family correspondence of Maurice Smith (1801-1871); the collection has letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tennessee. Copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regiment, C.S.A., to his parents, a history of Tulip and Tulip Ridge, Arkansas, by Smith entitled The Romance of, Tulip (Memphis: 1965), On this Rock . . . the Chronicle of a Southern Family, which is a history by Smith of the family of Colonel Samuel Smith and Mary Webb Smith of Abram's Plains, North Carolina; biographies of the Captain Nicholas Martian (1591-1657) and of Samuel Granville Smith (1794-1835); anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; a history of the Pearson family by Smith entitled This Valued Lineage; history of the Thompson family by Smith entitled These Many Hearths; albums of the Smith family containing pictures, clippings, and copies of letters and wills dating as early as 1649; genealogy of the Melton family by Herman E. Melton entitled Sassafras Sprouts; an anthropological study of the Indians of Kentucky Lake, Tennessee, by C. H. McNutt and J. Bennett Graham; and a pamphlet, 1961, by Smith entitled A Statement of Faith.

There is a microfilm copy of 'The Remembrance Pilgrimage. The Story of a Southern Family' (1964) available.

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William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.

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Holograph document. A bill presented for "writings made and business done for Mr. Michael Harvey and Mr. William Harvey his brother."
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William Tilghman papers, 1671-1876 2.8 Linear Feet — 5 Boxes, 900 items

Papers concerned with Tilghman's law practice in Chestertown, Md., and his service in the Maryland legislature (1788-1793). Includes genealogical information about Maryland's Eastern Shore, information about economic and agricultural conditions in Maryland in the late 18th century, Tilghman's vicissitudes because of his Loyalist sympathies during the Revolution, his efforts to advance the interests of his constituents while he served in the legislature, and the Tilghman family. Volumes include a digest of legal cases in which Tilghman participated, legal notes, court dockets, and a summary of estate laws in Maryland. Includes three letters from Henry Pearce. Two of these letters are to James Tilghman, William's father, regarding the purchase of Pearce land, slaves, stock, etc.

This collection houses the papers of William Tilghman (1756-1824), lawyer and chief justice of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. They relate chiefly to his law practice in Maryland, 1783-1793, and to his service in the Maryland general assembly, 1788-1793, and include legal papers dealing with litigation, land sales, the collection of debts, notes, the settlement of estates, and other legal matters. Included are deeds, indentures, wills, estate records, court records, and other legal papers relating chiefly to Cecil, Kent, and Queen Anne counties, a roster, 1818-1819, of the citizens of Charles County, scattered papers pertaining to the Church of England in Maryland, occasional references to personal matters, and legal and business papers concerning the family, including papers dealing with loan transactions and with the settlement of the estate of William Tilghman.

The collection also has scattered papers of Tilghman's father, James Tilghman, a lawyer, several bills and accounts of St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, and Charlotte Hall School, Charlotte Hall, Maryland, petitions and acts relating to Tilghman's career in the general assembly chiefly dealing with the settlement of local affairs, including the disposal of reserved lands, an evaluation of land in various counties, and an estimate of the cost of building a turnpike between Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D. C., and other papers dealing with legal and business matters.

The volumes are a digest, 1747-1760, of cases at law in which James Tilghman was an attorney, a System of Law concerning Estates by Richard Tilghman IV, legal notes kept by William Tilghman as a young man, and dockets of William Tilghman in the Kent County court for the March 1794 term.

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Richard Wharton was a prominent Boston merchant, land proprietor, attorney, and political figure. Collection comprises a 1671 slave trade contract committing Boston merchant Richard Wharton to acquire slaves for Jonathan Sybury of Maryland in return for tobacco. This contract specifies that prior to the last day of July, 1671, Wharton will "Send forth and Imploy A vessel to Some one or more Islands of America where Negroes are ordinarily to be Sold wch sd vessell shall bee loadon wth a sufficient Cargoe for obtayning and purchasing ten or more healthy & sound Negroes halfe Males and halfe females none exceeding ye age of forty years and not more than two the age of thirty five years" and that the vessel "shall...Carry and Transport to Wye River in Maryland The sd Negroes..." The contract further stipulates that within seven days after the arrival of the vessel in the Wye River, Sybury "will show present and Deliver at some [?] convenient shipping place...the quantity of Three Thousand six hundred and Eighty pounds of bright and large Tobacco without ground leaves or seconds." Failing such payment, Sybury is required to pay with bills of exchange redeemable in London. Much of the contract reckons with various circumstances that might arise and the terms specific to these. The document is signed by Wharton on the lower right and by witnesses John Walley and Georg Young on the lower left.

Collection comprises a 1671 slave trade contract committing Boston merchant Richard Wharton to acquire slaves for Jonathan Sybury of Maryland in return for tobacco. This contract specifies that prior to the last day of July, 1671, Wharton will "Send forth and Imploy A vessel to Some one or more Islands of America where Negroes are ordinarily to be Sold wch sd vessell shall bee loadon wth a sufficient Cargoe for obtayning and purchasing ten or more healthy & sound Negroes halfe Males and halfe females none exceeding ye age of forty years and not more than two the age of thirty five years" and that the vessel "shall...Carry and Transport to Wye River in Maryland The sd Negroes..." The contract further stipulates that within seven days after the arrival of the vessel in the Wye River, Sybury "will show present and Deliver at some [?] convenient shipping place...the quantity of Three Thousand six hundred and Eighty pounds of bright and large Tobacco without ground leaves or seconds." Failing such payment, Sybury is required to pay with bills of exchange redeemable in London. Much of the contract reckons with various circumstances that might arise and the terms specific to these. The document is signed by Wharton on the lower right and by witnesses John Walley and Georg Young on the lower left. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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King Charles II of England (1630-1685) did not have any official heirs. He did, though, have many children by a number of mistresses. For the children born to these other women that the King acknowledged, most were given titles of nobility within a few years of their birth (along with most of their mothers). The names of seven of these children appear in this collection. This collection contains royal warrants or decrees issued during the reign of King Charles II of England. Of the seven documents, four are written on behalf of the King, two are 'certification of armes' the remaining item is a listing of possible heraldic figures. The names listed in the warrants are sons and daughters of the King and three of his mistresses.

This collection contains royal warrants or decrees issued during the reign of King Charles II of England concerning the assignment of 'armes' or royal titles. Four of the seven documents are written on behalf of the King by the Earl Marshall of England. Two are 'certification of armes' by Edward Walker. The remaining item is a listing of possible heraldic figures to be used for any of the King's children. The names listed in the warrants are sons and daughters of the King and three of his known mistresses. Those listed include Anne Palmer Fitzroy, Charles Fitzroy, Charlotte Fitzroy, George Fitzroy, and Henry Fitzroy, children of Charles II and Barbara née Villiers (1641-1709). Charles Lennox, the son of Charles II and Louise Renée de Penancoet de Kérouaille (1649–1734) and Charles Beauclerk, son of Charles II and Nell Gwyn (1650-1687). Three of the four warrant papers are early drafts of the final documents.

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The Wesley Works Editorial Project, founded in 1960, is an international and inter denominational consortium of scholars that is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The Wesley Works Archive, dating from 1676 to 1996, with the bulk ranging from 1724-1791 and 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). The collection consists of that portion of the project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's editor and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy, who have participated in the Project. There is much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing; materials in the collection also throw light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The Wesley Works Archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). Formed in 1960, this international and inter denominational consortium of scholars is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The collection consists of that portion of the Project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's General Editor, Textual Editor, and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy who have participated in the Project. Because John Wesley preached, wrote, and published so widely, the content of the research materials required for a full edition of his writings necessarily contains much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also much information about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing. Beyond the ostensible purpose of the WWEP, however, the modern correspondence and scholarly debate contained in these papers also throws light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The collection also sheds light on the history and mechanics of the transmission of texts. That is, while the reproduced printed materials here document the complex publishing and textual history of the thousands of editions of Wesley's writings to appear in his lifetime alone, at the same time the original writings of modern scholars involved in the WWEP document how older texts are researched and recovered from the past, all for the purpose of establishing a present authoritative text to be passed on to the future.

Series in the Wesley Works Archive are arranged to correspond to the unit structure of the thirty-five volume Bicentennial Edition. Described more fully below, the initial sixteen series of the archive and the sixteen units and thirty-five volumes of the Bicentennial Edition are as follows: Sermons (1-4); Explanatory Notes upon the New Testament (5-6); A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (7); Worship (8); The Methodist Societies (9-10); The Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion and Certain Related Open Letters (11); Doctrinal and Controversial Treatises (12-13); Social/Political Tracts (14); Catechetical/Educational Works (15); Editorial Works (16); Medical Writings (17); Journals and Diaries (18-24); Letters (25-31); Oxford Diaries (32); Bibliography (33-34); and Index and Miscellanea (35). A concluding seventeenth series, General Files, gathers materials about the overall history and organization of the WWEP.

The history of the Wesley Works Editorial Project already extends more than fifty years, from its inception in 1960 to the 2011 publication of The Methodist Societies: The Minutes of Conference. This volume, as the seventeenth to be published, marks the halfway point of the entire Bicentennial Edition, which will comprise thirty-four volumes plus a concluding general index volume. Although the General Files are placed as the final series in order to avoid interrupting the parallel structure of series and volumes, they actually mark the best place to begin an overview of the collection, since their various folder groups document much of the administrative history of the Project. Overviews and details of the Project's inception, history, institutional support, and editorial guidelines are best found in the folder groups for the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board. The history of the actual content, intellectual structure, and presentation of volumes can be found in such groups as grouped under such categories as Editorial Procedures and Bulletins of the WWP. Most of the latter were issued by Frank Baker in the 1970s and contain much detail about the content and style choices that were being made for various volumes. The General Files also contain materials that may relate to more than one unit of the Bicentennial Edition, as well as some Wesley publications not selected for inclusion, especially his Explanatory Notes Upon the Old Testament.

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Kilby and his son, Wilbur John Kilby (1850-1907), were both lawyers of Suffolk, Virginia, and of members of the Riddick family. Correspondence and legal and other papers of Kilby and of his son, Wilbur John Kilby (1850-1907), both lawyers, of Suffolk, Va., and of members of the Riddick family. The bulk of the collection concerns such legal activities of the Kilbys as administration of estates, collection of bills, and adjustments of property. The collection is important in part for its early records of families and references to politics and social conditions of Nansemond County, Virginia, but also for its references to slavery, the American Colonization Society and conditions in Liberia, and for its slave lists from the Riddick and Glazebrook families. There are many wills, one of which refers to the manumission of slaves. Other items refer to the legal affairs of the Riddick family, Richard H. Riddick, merchant of Pantego, N.C., and agent of the Albemarle Swamp Land Company; pro-Civil War activities of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Southampton Insurrection of 1831; Civil War action near Shepherdstown and Fredericksburg; African American soldiers during Reconstruction; the Negro Reformatory Association of Virginia; the gold rush of Pike's Peak, Colorado; a Suffolk, Va. cholera epidemic; and the Panic of 1857.

Correspondence and legal and other papers of Kilby and of his son, Wilbur John Kilby (1850-1907), both lawyers, of Suffolk, Virginia, and of members of the Riddick family. The bulk of the collection dates from 1840-1889 and concerns such legal activities of the Kilbys as administration of estates, collection of bills, and adjustments of property. The collection is important in part for its records of families and social conditions of Nansemond County, Virginia.

Other important subjects include genealogical information for other families; the case of Harriet Whitehead, whose mind was impaired by the loss of her family in the Nat Turner Southampton Insurrection, 1831; freedom for slaves, with references to the work of the American Colonization Society and to life and conditions in Liberia; legal affairs of the Riddick family, Richard H. Riddick, merchant of Pantego, N.C., and agent of the Albemarle Swamp Land Company; pro-Civil War activities of the Methodist Episcopal Church; the Suffolk, Va. cholera epidemic (1849); the Panic of 1857 and the Pike's Peak, Colorado gold rush in 1859; action around Fredericksburg and Shepherdstown during the Civil War; African American soldiers in Charleston, S.C. during Reconstruction; Nansemond County, Virginia politics, especially during W. J. Kilby's career; and the Negro Reformatory Association of Virginia.

Several slave lists date from 1839-1858. The most extensive is of the Riddick family in undated legal papers. As the Office of Clerk of County burned in 1866, the legal, financial, and genealogical records are valuable for their information. A partial list of wills also exists, including the wills of Josiah Riddick, Richard Riddick, and John Glazebrook. One will, later contested, stipulates the manumission of a slave. Volumes include daybooks, memoranda, account books, notebooks, both professional and personal, as well as broadsides of land sales in Nansemond County, Virginia. The genealogical records are a photocopy of the printed genealogy of the Kilby, Jynes, Riddick, and Glazebrook families.

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Joseph Jones papers, 1681-1895 1.33 Linear Feet — 704 items

Papers of militia officer and customs collector Joseph Jones of Petersburg, Va., and of his children and grandchildren, including business, personal, and military correspondence, deeds, Virginia militia records, general orders, Treasury Dept. circulars, lists of licensed vessels, letters regarding western lands, and papers relating to the port of Petersburg, Va. Correspondents include John Adams, William H. Crawford, Albert Gallatin, Richard Bland Lee, James Madison, Timothy Pickering, John Randolph, and John Tyler.

The papers of Joseph Jones (1749-1824) span the period 1681 to 1895, with the majority of papers dating from 1794 to 1842. The collection is divided into six series: Correspondence, 1781-1895 and undated; Legal Papers, 1681-1888 and undated; Financial Papers, 1772-1875 and undated; Customs Collector Papers, 1796-1836 and undated; Military Papers, 1788-1864 and undated; and Miscellany, 1801-1854 and undated. Within each series the material is arranged chronologically. The Correspondence and Customs Collector Papers comprise the bulk of the collection.

Primarily emphasized in the collection are Jones' land holdings in Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Ohio, some awarded on account of his military service during the Revolution; his service as Brigadier-General in the 15th Brigade of the Virginia Militia during the Whiskey Rebellion; his work as customs collector at the port of Petersburg; and a variety of legal and financial papers.

The collection covers three generations of the Jones Family. After Jones' death in 1824, papers chiefly relate to his children and other relatives. Among those represented are Jones' sons: Joseph Jr., who managed some of his father's farming interests; R. Benson, who worked for various merchants in New York in the 1840's; Thomas, who was sheriff in Chesterfield County, Va. in 1838; and Thomas' wife, Mary Newton Jones, and her brother Virginia Congressman Willoughby Newton, plus other related families. There is extensive correspondence between Mrs. Mary M. Jones and others (chiefly in the 1840's) indicating that she owned both real estate and slaves. Some of this property was located in Westmoreland County, Va.

Other subjects include reaction to the passage by Congress of Jay's treaty, documents relating to slave holdings, social conditions of women in the 19th century, and the service of Jones' grandson, Captain Thomas Jones, in the 40th Virginia Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

For further information about Jones, see the Department's William Bragg Papers. Bragg became Jones' business partner about 1770 in Petersburg, Va.

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Rhodes scholar and lawyer of Asheville, N.C. Collection is divided into the following categories: Correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); Writings (1682-1965); Speeches (1896-1965); Miscellany (ca. 1908); Clippings (1792-1975); Printed materials (1865-1977); Volumes (1886-1954); Pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an Alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. Most of the material spans the years 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests; family correspondence and photographs; clippings; and scrapbooks. Cocke's many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; and travels in Europe. Some letters refer to Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew.

Collection reflects the varied interests of Cocke. It is divided into the following categories: correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); writings (1682-1965); speeches (1896-1965); miscellany (ca. 1908); clippings (1792-1975); printed materials (1865-1977); volumes (1886-1954); pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. The collection covers a wide variety of topics and time periods, but most of the material has dates in the span 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests. His many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; travels in Europe; Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew; publishing efforts; and a meeting with Lady Astor and the future King Edward VII. Other items include family letters; manuscripts by Cocke's mother, Nola, including "My Reminiscences of the Sixties (1861-1865)" about the Reconstruction era in Tenn.; clippings regarding a proposed N.C. constitution amendment requiring a literacy test for voter registrants in the 1860s; speeches by William Cocke, Sr., mayor of Asheville, N.C.; a guardian's account book later turned into a scrapbook; a large campaign scrapbook for Senate candidate Alton Asa Lennon; Cocke-Dilworth family photographs and many albumen prints of Europe. Topics in the alphabetical file include civic clubs; United World Federalists, Inc.; the attempt to establish the state of Franklin in what is now western N.C.; legal cases regarding horse stealing, a slave sale, and other topics; court reform in N.C. and the Bell Committee; and the Commission on International Cooperation under the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development.

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India and East India Company papers, 1691-1830 0.5 Linear Feet — 55 Items

The East India Company was an English joint-stock company formed in 1600 that ruled portions of South Asia until 1858. This collection contains over 55 documents including miscellaneous legal papers, correspondence, receipts, and extracts largely relating to the East India Company's operations and employees; three documents relating to Muhammad Ali Khan Wallajah, the Nabob of Arcot (1745-1795); manuscripts relating to Sir Robert Chambers (1737-1803), who traveled to India in 1774 as one of the first justices of the Supreme Court at Calcutta; and a petition written by the wife of Almas Ali Khan, an important administrator in Awadh and one of the key figures in the trial of Warren Hastings. These manuscripts seem to have formerly been part of Sir Thomas Phillipps noted collection.

This collection contains over 55 documents in four discrete folders. The first folder contains miscellaneous legal documents, correspondence, receipts, and extracts largely relating to East India Company operations and employees, including the earliest document in the collection, a 1691 transfer of EIC stock signed by Sir Josia[h] Child. Some of the manuscripts in the collection appear to have been once in the collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps. The second folder contains three documents relating to Muhammad Ali Khan Wallajah, the Nabob of Arcot (1745-1795). The third folder contains manuscripts relating to Sir Robert Chambers, who traveled to India in 1774 as one of the first justices of the Supreme Court at Calcutta. The collection of Chambers' manuscripts includes letters to the Justices at Calcutta as a whole, a fragmentary legal opinion, and a petition written by the wife of Almas Ali Khan, an important administrator in Awadh and one of the focal points in the trial of Warren Hastings. The fourth folder contains one bound volume of miscellaneous correspondence, some related to the case of merchant James Paull (1770-1808), formerly in the noted collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps.

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Holograph document, signed. Deed for a grant of land. On verso, a receipt for quit rent due on the granted, dated 1739, and a certificate of entry in the Office for Recording of Deeds, dated 1755.
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Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton collection, 1695-1955 and undated 80.5 Linear Feet — approx. 11,160 Items

Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton collected art, rare books, and manuscripts, and made many contributions to art museums and libraries, most notably the Duke University Library, the Mint Museum, and the library of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The Dalton Collection is comprised of sub-collections acquired by Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton.

The Dalton Collection is comprised of sub-collections acquired by Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton. Included are family papers, correspondence, diaries, account books, photographs, engravings, land grants, and military papers. The material largely encompasses the Civil War, Southern [U.S.] history, business and politics. The material ranges in date from 1695-1955.

Each sub-collection is listed in alphabetical order below. Most include their descriptions from the catalog record as well as a link to the record which will serve to state the physical location of the sub-collections. For the small number of sub-collections not yet fully cataloged, a brief description will follow as well as which Dalton Collection box the material resides in.

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William Helfand is a scholar of pharmaceutical history and art, and collector of ephemera and art related to medicine. The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats, to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

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The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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William Baskerville Hamilton papers, 1700-1975 80 Linear Feet — 53,700 items

Correspondence, memoranda, and reports, relating to Hamilton's teaching career; reasearch notes for his work in antebellum Mississippi history, particularly the Territorial period, and for biographies of William Wyndham Grenville, Baron, and William Murray, Earl of Mansfield; and personal and family papers. Includes ca. 9,000 British historical manuscripts donated by Hamilton, cataloged separately by the repository. Correspondents include Nash Kerr Burger, Hubert Creekmore, Eudora Welty, and other Mississippi literary figures.

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The Picture File was created by the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library as a vertical file from the 1950s to the 1980s. Images were separated from manuscript collections as well as added individually from other sources. The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. Formats represented include black and white photographic prints; cartes de visite, cabinet cards and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes; engravings and lithographs; political cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. Organized into four main series: Subjects, Geographic, Socialist Party, and People. To allow for better housing, Negatives and Stereographs have been separated into their own series.

The images offer representations of the landscape, culture, and history of most of the southern United States, especially Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North and South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Many images of France, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, and some African countries can also be found; a large number of other countries and geographic locations are represented by only a few images. Many political figures and notable personages are portrayed, both in portrait and in caricature; there are especially significant numbers of images of Eugene Debs, Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C.

Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and scenes of devastation both rural and urban. Other conflicts are also depicted, including the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and there are some images from both World Wars. A significant group of items in the People Series pertains to African Americans, ranging from studio portraits to caricatures of individuals and groups of individuals; a smaller group of images features depictions of Native Americans. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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Hypes family papers, 1700s-2010 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 1 pamphlet binder — Approximately 2250 Items

Materials from the branch of the Hypes family that descended from Henry Hypes of Xenia, Ohio: Samuel Henry Hypes (1826-1916); his son, William Findlay Hypes; his grandson, Samuel Loomis Hypes; and his great-grandson, William P. Hypes. Collection includes a wide range of material from the Hypes family, particularly William Findlay Hypes, Samuel Loomis Hypes, and William P. Hypes. William Findlay Hypes' materials highlight his career at Marshall Fields and Co. of Chicago and his service as President of the Y.M.C.A. of Chicago, with emphasis on his family's world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. in 1924-1925. Hundreds of postcards and photographs collected by the family are contained in the papers, including images from India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, Europe, Egypt, and many more places, most unlabeled. Some material from Samuel Loomis Hypes' army service during World War I is also included, the most noteworthy being 24 black and white photographs featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States, including photographs of African American soldiers. Materials from William P. Hypes relate to his work with the Y.M.C.A. in the mid-twentieth century. The family's research into their genealogy and family history, unidentified family photographs, and smaller amounts of correspondence and material from other family members are also included.

There is a wide range of material from the Hypes family's many generations present in this collection. Some early material exists from Henry Hypes, including an inventory of his property upon his death, and some correspondence from relatives. Other early materials include family photographs, which are largely unlabeled and undated but include formats such as tintypes, a daguerreotype, cartes de visite, negatives, and others.

The Hypes' attempts to reconstruct their family tree resulted in several letters between extended family members and distant cousins, as well as genealogical maps and notes, dating from the early to mid-twentieth century.

The majority of the collection dates from William Findlay Hypes and his family. W.F. Hypes' materials include correspondence and clippings about his career with Marshall Fields and Co., as well as news coverage of his world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. from 1924 to 1925. The collection also contains photographic prints, negatives, and postcards from this trip, featuring images from India, China, Japan, Egypt, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Europe, and other unidentified places. The photographs are largely gelatin silver prints, and many have silvering. The majority of photographs are amateur shots presumably taken by the Hypes family. However, there are several sets of images which were clearly purchased by W.F. Hypes or other family members as travel souvenirs, including a set from India taken by H.R. Ferger and a set from Taormina, Italy. These all appear to date from the early 1900s. Many types of postcards are present, including real photo postcards and tinted color postcards. Several postcard books were purchased as souvenirs. Most postcards have been sorted by location; real photo postcards have also been sleeved to better protect the images. Real photo postcard locations include Norway, Manila, China, Japan, and a set from the Canadian Rockies.

An earlier trip to Europe and the Middle East by W.F. Hypes and his wife is described in letters between them and their daughter Muriel. This trip appears to have been taken in May and June, 1910. Since most of the collection's photographs are undated, some could date from this trip instead of the world tour trip from 1924-1925.

One part of the collection is closed to researchers: there is a small amount of nitrate and safety negatives. These appear to be taken by W.F. Hypes, and include family photographs, scenes from Jamaica, and scenes of a tiger hunt during the Hypes' Y.M.C.A. tour. The tiger hunt images are available as prints in the photographs portion of the materials. All negatives are closed to researchers.

Along with the extensive amount of photographs and postcards, W.F. Hypes' portion of the papers includes souvenir booklets and other collectibles from his travels. Also present are materials from the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, including a set of tickets as well as a stock certificate. Hypes' political leanings can be inferred from a Republican National Convention ticket for the 1904 election, as well as a small, movable medal that spins and denounces William Jennings Bryan.

Another noteworthy part of the collection comes from Samuel Loomis Hypes, W.F. Hypes' son, who served as a captain in the U.S. Army's 803rd Pioneer Infantry during World War I. This portion of the papers contains 24 black-and-white photographs (18? June-19 July 1919) featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States. Photographs often have captions in white ink. There are six crowd scenes in Paris and outside Versailles before and after the signing of the treaty. However, the majority of the photographs follow the movement of ships and troops out of Brest Navy yard, including the USS Imperator and the USS Philippine. There are group photos of the 803rd's officers and one photograph of a German submarine. Among the 4,000 troops aboard the Philippine were many African American soldiers, and there are photographs of these men playing in the 803rd's regimental band and of a boxing match they held during the voyage, as well as other photos. The collection also contains two postcards showing group photographs of soldiers [officers?] taken at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916 - probably at the large World War I military training camp there.

Other materials from Samuel Loomis Hypes include his officer's record book, honorary discharge following the war, as well as clippings about Sugar Hollow, a North Carolina development begun by Hypes and his wife in the 1950s.

Finally, the collection also includes several files from William P. Hypes, an officer in the Y.M.C.A. in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from his work towards the Y.M.C.A. World Action program.

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Thomas Stampe papers, 1701-1714 0.4 Linear Feet — 1 Bound Volume

Rector of Langley Burrell, Wiltshire, England; Nonjuror. Volume of writings and correspondence of Thomas Stampe, who, in 1701, recanted an oath of allegiance to William and Mary, and thus became a Nonjuror while a beneficed clergy of the Church of England. Writings and letters all relate to the issues of religion, government, and allegiances, and mention George Hickes and Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells. Also includes correspondence with Gilbert Burnet, the Bishop of Salisbury.

Volume of writings and correspondence of Thomas Stampe, who, in 1701, recanted an oath of allegiance to William and Mary, and thus became a Nonjuror while a beneficed clergy of the Church of England. Writings and letters all relate to the issues of religion, government, and allegiances, and mention George Hickes and Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells. Also includes correspondence with Gilbert Burnet, the Bishop of Salisbury.

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Cosimo III notice of rents, 1705 February 1 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 item

Cosimo III de' Medici was the penultimate Medici Grand Duke of Tuscany. He reigned from 1670 to 1723, and was the elder son of Grand Duke Ferdinando II. Collection contains a letter on vellum that is a notice from Cosimo III de Medici (Duke of Etruria etc.), to John Philip de Incontris of Florence regarding rents of 222 and 220L in reference to John Philip’s equestrian military preparation. Dated at Florence, 1 February 1705, in the 35th year of the Dukedom of Etruria.

Collection contains a letter on vellum that is a notice from Cosimo III de Medici (Duke of Etruria etc.), to John Philip de Incontris of Florence regarding rents of 222 and 220L in reference to John Philip’s equestrian military preparation. Dated at Florence, 1 February 1705, in the 35th year of the Dukedom of Etruria. Text in Latin.

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Alexander Robinson Boteler papers, 1707-1924 3 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1,686 items (incl. 4 vols.)

Correspondence of Alexander's father, Dr. Henry Boteler, for 1776-1837; and family letters of Alexander with information on his career at Princeton College and his courtship of his future wife, Helen Macomb Stockton. Political correspondence, relating to the election of 1860, the Constitutional Union party, and Alexander's travels around the country in 1882-1884 while a member of the U.S. tariff commission. Volumes include Boteler's diary for 1845, relative to his farming activities; various scrapbooks and some genealogical materials on the Pendleton, Digges, and Pope families. Among the correspondents are Lewis Cass, Samuel Cooper, John B. Floyd, S. B. French, Wade Hampton, T. J. Jackson, Andrew Johnson, R. E. Lee, John Letcher, W. P. Miles, John Page, Thomas N. Page, Rembrandt Peale, W. N. Pendleton, W. C. Rives, Alexander Robinson, W. H. Seward, J.E.B. Stuart, Jacob Thompson, J. F. Thompson, and Dabney C. Wirt.

This collection consists of family letters of Alexander R. Boteler (1815-1892), Virginia political leader, congressman, and Civil War soldier, with sidelights on his career at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, his courtship of Helen Macomb Stockton, whom he later married, his altercations with Charles J. Faulkner, and "Yankee" depredations at his home, "Fountain Rock," during the Civil War; political correspondence, 1855-1870, relating to the election of 1860 and the Constitutional Union Party; letters concerning Boteler's travels about the country in 1882-1884 while a member of the U.S. Tariff Commission; correspondence concerning claims of James Rumsey as inventor of the first steamboat; and legal and personal papers of Helen (Stockton) Boteler's father, Ebenezer S. Stockton, and grandfather, Robert Stockton. Volumes include Boteler's diary, 1845, relative to his farming activities; a scrapbook on the election of 1848; a scrapbook containing clippings, letters, and pictures devoted principally to the activities and interests of Boteler; and a scrapbook containing clippings, letters, and pictures concerning the Pendleton, Digges, and Pope families, especially the life of Dudley Digges Pendleton who married Helen Stockton Boteler.

The collection also contains the correspondence of Alexander R. Boteler's father, Dr. Henry Boteler, for 1776-1837. Among other correspondents are A. R. Boteler, Lewis Cass, Samuel Cooper, John B. Floyd, S. B. French, Wade Hampton, T. J. Jackson, Andrew Johnson, R. E. Lee, John Letcher, W. P. Miles, John Page, Thomas N. Page, Rembrandt Peale, W. N. Pendleton, W. C. Rives, Alexander Robinson, W. H. Seward, J. E. B. Stuart, Jacob Thompson, J. R. Thompson, Dabney C. Wirt.

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Collection comprises a manuscript volume (170 pages) written in several hands that was probably passed among the generations in the Stennett family; probably from Joseph Stennett to Samuel; there is a notation on p. 11 that the volume was passed from Samuel Stennett to E[lizabeth] Stennett, his daughter, in 1795. The volume contains religious materials, primarily hymns and poetry, including hymns by Samuel Stennett (beginning p. 53), along with some verse. A few pieces are in Latin, and many pieces are tied to Biblical verses. Corrections and additions to the text are common.