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Duke University Libraries Collection of Haggadot, 1200-2003 (bulk 1900-2003 436 items — 436 Items

The Duke University Libraries Collection of Haggadot consists mainly of Passover Haggadot (singular: Haggadah) from the past 1000 years. The 436 Haggadot in the collection, which are found in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, the Divinity School Library, Perkins Library, and Lilly Library, span 800 years (1200-2003), represent five continents (excluding only Australia and Antarctica), are written in several different languages (including Russian, Marathi, Italian, Yiddish, Ladino and Arabic), and were created for a variety of specific purposes. A majority of the Haggadot were published in the 20th century. A large number of the Haggadot are illustrated or illuminated while others contain only the text. Although the majority of the Haggadot in the collection were created by printing press, or other printing methods, Duke does own a number of limited edition facsimile editions of handwritten manuscripts. Most, but not all, of the Haggadot found in the Special Collections Library come from the Abram and Frances Pascher Kanof Collection of Jewish Art, Archaeology, and Symbolism. This guide does not include the Duke University Libraries' collection of microfilmed Haggadot. See the last paragraph of the Processing and Searching Note below for further information on searching for Haggadot in the library.

Since many of the Haggadot have similar titles (e.g. Hagadah shel Pesah yields 121 results), and to accommodate the variety of ways in which patrons might want to search for Haggadot, the entire collection has been arranged into three different series: Date List Series, Location List Series, and Purpose List Series. Each of these series contains the entire collection of Haggadot, but arranged according to different criteria. Therefore, the item with call number Haggadah Pam #106, an advertising Haggadah from 19th century New York, can be found in three places: 1) in the Date List under the 19th Century Subseries; 2) in the Location List under the United States Subseries; and 3) in the Purpose List under the Advertising Subseries.

The Date List Series is subdivided by century for Haggadot published from the 13th through the 19th centuries and by decade (e.g., 1910-1919) for those Haggadot created during the 20th and 21st centuries. The majority of the Haggadot (84%) are from the 20th century.

The Location List Series arranges the collection by the country where each Haggadah was created--usually where the item was printed--then by the date of creation. However, facsimile editions have been arranged by the place of their original creation. In these cases, the location where the facsimile was printed is identified in the description of each facsimile. This series is further arranged into subseries by country, including Algeria, Argentina, Austria, Bosnia-Hercegovina, Canada, Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Morocco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Tunisia, and United States.

The Purpose List Series is further subdivided by the specific purpose for which each Haggadah was written. Most of the Haggadot were created for use at a Passover seder and thus are arranged into the General Subseries. These Haggadot are generally traditional in content and are meant to be used by anyone. Other purpose subseries include Advertising, Children, Christian, Denominations (of Judaism), Facsimiles, Fundraising, Kibbutz, Parody, and Resource.

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Earl J. Hamilton papers, 1350-1995 43.5 Linear Feet — 32,625 Items

Collection spans the years 1350 to 1995, and contains Earl J. Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The Earl J. Hamilton Papers span the years from 1350 to 1995, with Hamilton's research notes and other materials dating chiefly from the 1930s to the 1970s. (Note: Early dates reflect original dates of primary sources rather than the dates on which the photocopies of these sources were created.) Hamilton was a pioneer in the field of quantitative economic history during a career that spanned fifty years. Together with his wife, Gladys Dallas Hamilton, he conducted important research during the 1930s and 1940s on the history of the South American and Spanish economies; the history of American, Spanish, and French banking; the history of John Law and the "Mississippi Bubble" and its effect on European economies; and prices and wages in medieval Spain.

The collection includes not only extensive background notes for Hamilton's major books and articles, but also over 200 original legajos and other documents pertaining to Spanish trade and economic development, dating primarily from the 17th and 18th centuries. Other primary source materials from the 14th to the 18th centuries are also abundant (chiefly in the form of photostats and transcripts), including hundreds of copies of documents held by the Archivo del Banco de España, the Archivo Histórico Nacional, and other archives in Europe.

Photocopies and microfilm copies of items which belong to other libraries and archives may require permission of the owner institution to further reproduce or publish. Users making further copies for their own research do so at their own discretion. Before publication of any such material, it is the user's responsibility to identify the original source and obtain permission.

The collection also contains drafts and reprints of research papers, and numerous folders of academic and personal correspondence. Some documents in the collection are in French or Spanish.

Note that the early dates given in collection and series titles reflect the dates of the original primary source material that Hamilton used for his research, not the date when the photostat, photocopy or transcription was created.

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Francis Warrington Dawson family papers, 1386-1963, bulk 1859-1950 30 Linear Feet — 7,986 items

Journalist, of Charleston, S.C., and Versailles, France. The collection contains the papers of Francis Warrington Dawson, who was born Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler Morgan Dawson; and their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, better known as Warrington Dawson. The papers are primarily literary in character but also include many letters. Francis's papers are primarily autobiographical with information about his Civil War service, travels, courtship, and career. Also present are Morgan family papers describing social life in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., in the second half of the 19th century, especially during Reconstruction. Warrington Dawson materials document his work with the American Embassy in Paris and describes French life and politics. Also present is material from his work as director of French Research for Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., including copies (made from the originals at Colonial Williamsburg) of original documents pertaining to French participation in the American Revolution. Also included are copies of 18th century maps of North America, Williamsburg, Va., and positions of the French and American armies in New York and Virginia during the Revolutionary War.

The collection comprises the papers of Francis Warrington (Frank) Dawson (1840-1889), whose original name was Austin John Reeks; his wife, Sarah Ida Fowler (Morgan) Dawson; and of their son, Francis Warrington Dawson II, known as Warrington Dawson (1878-1962). The papers are primarily literary in character, with many editorials, newspaper writings, short stories, novels, articles, scrapbooks, diaries, reminiscences, and letters.

There are several series in the collection: Correspondence, Photographs, Scrapbooks, Writings, and Printed Materials document the family's activities in the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries. Warrington Dawson's research interests in French manuscripts, early American history, and family genealogy are also documented in the French Manuscripts and Research Files series.

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James Alexander Robertson papers, 1436?-1939 10 Linear Feet — 1840 Items

Librarian, archivist for State of Maryland, and historian, of Annapolis (Anne Arundel Co.), Md. Correspondence, notes, and works in manuscript and typescript concerning Philippine history, administrative problems and policies during the early years of American occupation, the Aglipay or Independent Filipino Church, Roman Catholicism, customs, geography, book manufacturing, education, José Rizal, Freemasonry, Filipino senators, and Katipunan of Filipino Secret Society. Many letters center around James Alfred Le Roy, authority on the Philippine Islands.

Correspondence, notes, and works in manuscript and typescript concerning Philippine history, administrative problems and policies during the early years of American occupation, the Aglipay or Independent Filipino Church, Roman Catholicism, customs, geography, book manufacturing, education, José Rizal, Freemasonry, Filipino senators, and Katipunan of Filipino Secret Society. Many letters center around James Alfred Le Roy, authority on the Philippine Islands.

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Trinity College Historical Society collection, [1492?] - 1981 20 Linear Feet — 3500 Items

In 1892, Dr. Stephen B. Weeks, a professor of history at Trinity College, organized the Trinity College Historical Society. The goals of the Society were to collect, arrange, and preserve written materials and artifacts illustrative of the history of North Carolina and the South, and to promote the study of Southern history through lectures and publications. The Society benefited from the strong leadership of two history professors, John Spencer Bassett and William Kenneth Boyd. They made wide appeals for donations of historical materials and maintained a museum to house these relics. The meetings of the Society, held several times each year, provided a forum at which students and faculty could read their research papers and discuss their ideas. The best of these papers were published, from 1897 to 1956, in the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society. The collection includes historical notes about Trinity College and the Society, correspondence, meeting announcements, administrative files, publications, speeches, and artifacts. Materials range in date from [1492?] to 1981. English.

The collection includes a wide variety of material concerning the Trinity College Historical Society and ranges in date from [1492?] to 1981. The material includes historical notes, about Trinity College and the Trinity College Historical Society and includes transcribed notes, rosters, lists of donations, records, reviews of activities, stationary, and clippings. The correspondence and meeting announcements, [1926]-1981, includes general correspondence about the business of the Trinity College Historical Society and announcements and publicity for upcoming meetings. The administrative files, 1892-1978, includes minutes of the meetings held by the Trinity College Historical Society, and files kept by the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of the Society. Publications, 1897-1979, include copies of the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society and newsletters published from 1978-1979. Speeches, 1904-[1980], include notes, original manuscripts, and copies of speeches and papers presented at the meetings of the Trinity College Historical Society. The artifacts, [1492?]-1918, include items collected from all aspects of American life. These relics range from coins and medals, to wooden shoe soles, to a piece of what was thought to be Christopher Columbus's flag.

In January 2007, Box 20 and folders 170 and 173 were transferred to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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Harold Jantz papers, 1500-1989 30.5 Linear Feet — About 60,000 items

Noted professor of German literature and collector of German baroque literature. Professional correspondence, note cards, research and teaching files, essays, offprints and reprints of articles by Jantz and scholars associated with him, and other printed material. Notable items are manuscripts about Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and his FAUST, and manuscripts related to Francis Daniel Pastorius's Bee-Hive. Accession (2008-0159) consists largely of Jantz's correspondence and letters, 1978-1985. Also included are exam blue books, some miscellaneous printed material, and a scrapbook of chromolithographs dating from the Victorian period. The blue books contain writings by Jantz, some relating to Francis Pastorius, and are arranged numerically.

Professional correspondence, note cards, research and teaching files, essays, offprints and reprints of articles by Jantz and scholars associated with him, and other printed material. Notable items are manuscripts about Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and his FAUST, and manuscripts related to Francis Daniel Pastorius's Bee-Hive. Accession (2008-0159) consists largely of Jantz's correspondence and letters, 1978-1985. Also included are exam blue books, some miscellaneous printed material, and a scrapbook of chromolithographs dating from the Victorian period. The blue books contain writings by Jantz, some relating to Francis Pastorius, and are arranged numerically.

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John Jay TePaske papers, 1500s-1988 11.9 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

The following overview was compiled almost completely from the 1999 accession of the TePaske Papers, although the 1993 accession contains more of the same types of materials.

This collection consists of summaries of the fiscal records of the royal treasuries of key regions in colonial Spanish America. Represented in these records are present-day Mexico (New Spain), Peru, Upper Peru (Bolivia), Rio de la Plata (Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Chile, Ecuador, and Cuba. The scope of the records is broad and comprehensive, offering in most cases virtually complete series of fiscal data for the colonial era, from the sixteenth century through the early decades of the nineteenth century.

Variously known as sumarios, cartas cuentas, tanteos or relaciones juradas, the account summaries list all the revenues and expenditures in the account period for each particular treasury district. The royal treasuries (cajas) collected taxes and made disbursements. Tax receipts (cargo) included levies on silver production, sales and port taxes, Indian tribute, and royal monopolies on commodities, (tobacco, mercury, stamped legal paper) and legal transactions. Expenditures (data) included the salaries and upkeep of the district's royal bureaucracy, defense expenses, and support for the missionary activities of the church. Surplus revenue generally found its way into the viceroyalty's coffers to help defray costs related to governmental activities. Each summary synthesizes an account period's worth of transactions in each particular caja or treasury. As such, these documents provide a window into both the fiscal organization of the Spanish empire and the fiscal state of each district, and also help elucidate the diversity of economic life in the various treasury districts.

Most of these records come from the Archivo General de Indias in Sevilla, Spain. Originally organized into bundles or legajos, the account summaries were scattered in various sections of the Sevilla repository. The Contaduría section holds most of the accounts related to the period prior to the mid-eighteenth century. After that, the records are dispersed within the various Audiencia sections for each jurisdiction. For example, the records for the Lima treasury appear in the Audiencia of Lima section of the archive, and so on. The following list offers a broad overview of the location of the holdings in the Archivo General de Indias:

Peru: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 1679-1873); After 1760: Audiencia of Lima (legajos 38-50); Audiencia of Cuzco

Upper Peru: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 1795-1850); After 1760: Audiencia of Charcas (legajos 627-671); Audiencia of Lima (legajos 1301 and 1415)

Chile: Up to 1750: Contaduría (legajos 1854-1858, and 1860); After 1750: Audiencia of Chile (legajos 339-351, 395-415)

Rio de la Plata: Contaduría (legajos 1845, 1846, 1884, 1886A, 1887A, 1894A, 1894B); Audiencia of Buenos Aires (legajos 393-399, 401-409, 442, 445-446, 448, 450-451, 453-455, 457-458, 460-462, 464-466, 484, 619-620, 701-703); Audiencia of Lima (legajo 1416)

Ecuador: Contaduría (legajos 1377, 1539-1540, 1576-1577); Audiencia of Quito (legajos 140-141, 173, 165, 407, 413, 415-429, 469-475, 477, and 497)

Mexico: Up to 1760: Contaduría (legajos 677-940); After 1760: Audiencia of Mexico (legajos 2027-3198); Audiencia of Guadalajara (legajos 436-496)

These archival materials were originally collected for a collaborative research project designed to compile comprehensive fiscal data on the former Spanish American colonies. Except for the Cuban accounts, the majority of these sources have already been published in book format as the list below attests:

A. Mexico (New Spain) and Mexico City:

John J. TePaske and Herbert S. Klein. Ingresos y egresos de la Real Hacienda de Nueva España. 2 vols. México, D.F.: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, 1986-1988.

John J. TePaske and José y Mari Luz Hernández Palomo. La Real Hacienda de Nueva España: la Real Caja de México, 1576-1816. México: Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia, SEP, Departamento de Investigaciones Históricas, Seminario de Historia Económica, 1976.

B. Peru, Upper Peru (Bolivia), Rio de la Plata (Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay), Chile, and eighteenth-century Ecuador:

John J. TePaske and Herbert S. Klein. The Royal Treasuries of the Spanish Empire in America. 4 vols. Durham: Duke University Press, 1982-1990.

(Note: The fourth volume in the series on Ecuador was compiled by professors Alvaro Jara and John J. TePaske.)

We strongly encourage researchers to first read the introductions to the published accounts before consulting these records. In the introduction to each volume, researchers will find useful background information about the development of the royal treasury system in the districts for which there is fiscal data. The introductions also concisely explain the organization and operation of the treasuries, the structure of the account summaries and the terminology used in them, the use of multiple units of currency, and other important details about bookkeeping in colonial times.

Although the published account summaries faithfully replicate the originals, there are slight variations. The authors made minor changes to make the data more manageable. Monetary units were rounded off and the entries on both the income and expenditure sides of the accounts were standardized and arranged in alphabetical order. For more information on these and other methodological issues, please see the introduction to the volumes.

The TePaske collection consists of colonial Spanish American fiscal records in both microfilm and print. The printed materials are duplicates of the originals in microform.

Glossary:

caja real = royal treasury

cargo = income, revenue

data = expenditure, disbursement

legajo = bundle of documents

ramo = income/expenditure category

sumario = accounts, account summary (also carta cuenta, tanteo, relación jurada)

tesorero = treasury official (also contador)

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History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated 16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Jane L. Berdes papers, 1525-1993 79.5 Linear Feet — 46,000 Items

The Jane L. Berdes Collection (1525-1993) has as its focal points the four Venetian welfare institutions known as the Ospedali Grandi and their role as providers of musical training for girls and women. The inclusive dates for the collection begin with the dates of primary materials Berdes collected and extend through her lifetime. The collection consists primarily of Berdes's research notes and materials on the Ospedali Grandi, and photocopies or microfilms of primary sources, including musical scores in manuscript and printed editions. It also contains correspondence, photographs, recordings and printed materials. Berdes identified the maestri of the Ospedali Grandi, the music performed, and the names of over 800 women who were members of the cori , but relatively little is known about them individually with the exception of Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen. In addition, the collection features general materials pertaining to other women in music throughout history. The user is advised that some photocopies are unattributed and, where Berdes did not indicate composer or author, no attempt has been made to provide one. The archive contains very few of Berdes's personal papers.

The bulk of the collection is found in the Research Notes and Materials Series, which contains information gathered in preparation for her books on the Ospedali Grandi and Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen (MLS). The heart of this series is the Ospedali Grandi data designated as "Raw Materials," which contains information culled from primary sources and arranged by subject. Most subseries provide documentation for Raw Materials, including copies of primary and secondary sources, pictures of instruments and iconography, and a bibliography. Similar materials pertaining to Sirmen are here also, as is general information about women in music.

The Music Series contains manuscripts and early printed editions of music performed at the Ospedali Grandi in the form of photocopies or microfilms (printed scores in modern edition are grouped with Printed Materials). There is particular emphasis on the compositions of Sirmen, including some recordings of her music. Works by Bertoni, Galuppi, Hasse, Jommelli, Vivaldi and others are grouped alphabetically by composer. The Correspondence Series contains both general professional correspondence and "Thesis Correspondence," that is letters from other scholars, libraries, archives, museums, and churches in Italian, French and English concerning the Ospedali Grandi and Sirmen. The Miscellaneous Series includes Berdes's other publications on both musical and nonmusical subjects, music criticism, course notes from classes she taught or attended, and memorabilia from her years at Oxford University. A selection of pertinent reference books from Berdes's library is found in the Printed Material Series, as are some libretti, and musical scores by Vivaldi in modern edition.

The user is advised to consult Box #1 for an introduction to the contents of the collection. It contains a copy of Berdes's book Women Musicians in Venice: Musical Foundations, 1525-1855; two copies of her dissertation, entitled Musical Life at the Four Ospedali Grandi, 1525-1855; two binders described by the donor as "the road map to the collection" and a videotaped review of its contents prepared by Berdes.

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Josiah C. Trent papers, 1536-1961 and undated, bulk 1938-1951 6.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 1 oversize folder — approx. 1800 items — approximately 1800 items

U.S. thoracic surgeon, rare book and manuscript collector. The papers consist mostly of correspondence, printed material, photographs, and lecture notes taken during medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency, and notes and drafts for published and unpublished research and articles. The bulk of the material documents Dr. Trent's activities and publications as collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. There are folders of photographic reproductions of medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th century to the 20th century, whose content is reflected in the earliest dates for the collection. There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his rare book and manuscripts collection to the Duke Medical Center Library, along with condolences and other items related to his wife, Mary Duke Biddle Trent. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Josiah C. Trent papers consist mostly of correspondence, photographs, research files, and notes and drafts of published and unpublished research and articles. Many of these materials concern Dr. Trent's activities and publications as a collector and historian of medical practice, particularly surgery and epidemiology. The collection also includes printed materials, photographs, a card file - possibly of his personal library, and lecture notes taken during his medical training, as well as diplomas and certificates of residency. The Writings series reveals his wide interests in surgery, medicine in general, the humanities, and medical history.

There is also material relating to Dr. Trent's death and the subsequent donation of his large rare book, artifact, and manuscript collection to the Duke Medical Center Library. Early dates in the collection refer to the content of reproductions of 16th-19th century medical illustrations rather than their dates of reproduction.

The correspondence, found in the Subject Files folders, dates mostly from the 1940s and 1950s, documenting Dr. Trent's rare book and manuscript collecting, and his involvement with various professional organizations and his association and friendships with prominent figures in various fields: medical history - John Fulton, Henry Sigerist, W. W. Francis; book collecting - Henry Schuman; Duke University - Wilburt Davison, Lenox D. Baker. Some folders contain an index of the contents.

There is also some information concerning Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Dr. Trent's wife, who was instrumental in facilitating the support of the history of medicine collections at Duke.

The collection also contains several hundred photographic prints and negatives reproducing medical texts and illustrations dating from the 16th to 20th centuries. The earliest dates in the collection refer to the content of the images, rather than their reproduction by Dr. Trent, Duke Medical Library staff, and others, in the mid-20th century.

The files were kept in Dr. Trent's medical office and contain relatively few items which pertain to his private life. Items of a more personal nature may be found in the James H. and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans Family Papers in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.