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ALS. Describes the case history of Prince Frederick of England, who suffered from attacks of intermittent fever and convulsive asthma.
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John Zeigler papers, 1927-2013 (bulk 1942-1946) 2.2 Linear Feet — 1010 Items

Poet and book store owner in Charleston, SC. Collection predominantly contains World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, along with Zeigler's correspondence with his family. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients of Zeigler's correspondence and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include some documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writing and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

The John Ziegler correspondence spans the dates 1927-2013, with the bulk of the material consisting of World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, although there is also extensive correspondence between Zeigler and his family present. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writings and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

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Several hundred letters and petitions, dated February-March 1960, from citizens of Greensboro, N.C. to Chairman Edward Raymond Zane and other members of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations, expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the Woolworth and Kress lunch counters in the wake of the Greensboro sit-in demonstrations of early February 1960.

Collection contains several hundred letters and petitions from citizens of Greensboro expressing support for or opposition to integrated seating at the city's lunch counters, specifically at Woolworth's and Kress.

The letters, dated February-March 1960, are chiefly addressed to Zane as Chairman of the Advisory Committee on Community Relations in Greensboro or to Mayor George Roach and other members of the Advisory Committee. As Chairman of the Advisory Committee, Zane wrote an article in the Greensboro Daily News in the wake of the sit-ins soliciting the opinions of Greensboro citizens concerning the integration of lunch counters at Woolworth's and Kress.

Zane asked citizens to consider five alternatives to the situation: 1) "The situation to remain as it is," 2) "The two establishments to remove seats and serve everyone standing," 3) "The two establishments to serve everyone seated," 4) "The two establishments to reserve separate areas for seated white people and seated Negroes," and 5) "The two establishments to discontinue serving food."

Letters from both whites and African Americans offer support or opposition to Zane's alternatives and document sentiment regarding race relations in the community.

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A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

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Kristen R. Yount is associate professor of sociology, coordinator of the Sustainable Future Program at Northern Kentucky University. Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975.

Collection comprises material Yount gathered from socialist-feminist organizations across the United States, most likely in association with the national socialist-feminist conference for organizers held at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, in July 1975. Includes fliers and handouts; organizational histories, guiding documents, "principles of unity," information sheets, and position statements; pamphlets; film lists; a working paper; action notices; published articles; and newspaper clippings. Also includes handwritten notes on the relationship of Asian women to the larger movement, possibly written by Yount. During processing pieces created for use at the national conference were placed first in the folder, followed by material grouped according to the state in which the local socialist-feminist unit was located.

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The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

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Rev. William Young, was an itinerant Methodist preacher. Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848.

Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848. Each sermon is identified by a date and place and is signed by Young. They approximately follow the chronology of Young's circuit appointments. The text is followed by an index in which there is a brief thematic description of each sermon, along with the Bible verse upon which it is based.

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Isaac Jones Young Films, 1933-1940 14 items — 8mm film reels — 1.5 Linear Feet — 122 Gigabytes — MKV (FFV1) digital preservation files

Fourteen 8mm motion picture films created or collected by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina, primarily documenting his time spent in China in the late 1930s.

The Isaac Jones Young Films contains fourteen 8mm films made primarily by Isaac Jones Young, III, of Henderson, North Carolina. Eleven of the films document Jones's experiences in China, particularly around Shanghai and Tianjin, during the period 1936 to 1940, when he was employed by the Yi Tsoong Tobacco Company (British-American Tobacco's British Cigarette Company). Images include Shanghai in the aftermath of the Japanese invasion of China as part of the Sino-Japanese War, temples and parks in Beijing, a tobacco market and factory, the 1939 Tianjin Flood, stilt walkers, and Young's European/American colleagues in China. One of the films captures a birthday party at Young's family home in Henderson, NC. Two of the films were collected by Young, including a Kodak Cinefilm promotional reel profiling Hawaii, and a silent, black and white print of anime pioneer Noburo Ofuji's 1933 film, The Three Fearless Frogs (Kaeru sanyushi).

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Letters (128 items, 1972-1974) to Young from prospective contributors to The Male Muse, including W.H. Auden, William Barber, Victor Borsa, Bruce Boone, Jim Eggeling, Allen Ginsberg, and others. Although the majority of the letters deal specifically with possible poems for inclusion into the anthology, many of the writers touch on their lives as gay men and their opinions of gay literature. The letters contain many original autographs. The collection also includes a copy of the published book.

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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.