Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Lance R. Bell papers, 1947-2017 and undated

3.0 Linear Feet
Outdoor advertising executive with Southern Outdoor Markets and Associates of the Bell Company firms, based in Atlanta, Ga. Collection includes trade publications, awards booklets, reprints and other printed materials, slides, photographs, audiocassettes and 35mm films. Companies represented include the Associates of the Bell Company; Foote Cone & Belding; Foster & Kleiser; Institute of Outdoor Advertising; Outdoor Advertising Association of America; Outdoor Advertising Incorporated; Southern Outdoor Markets. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection includes trade publications, awards booklets, reprints and other printed materials, slides, photographs, audiocassettes and 35mm films. Companies represented include the Associates of the Bell Company; Foote Cone & Belding; Foster & Kleiser; Institute of Outdoor Advertising; Outdoor Advertising Association of America; Outdoor Advertising Incorporated; Southern Outdoor Markets. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

3 results in this collection

William Henry Chafe Oral History collection, 1933-1988 and undated

5.6 Linear Feet — circa 2930 Items
The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1988, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe's book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.

The William Henry Chafe Oral History Collection spans the years 1933 through 1988, with most of the materials dated between 1972 and 1978. The collection consists mainly of oral history interview tapes and transcripts, but also includes interview notes and research files related to Chafe's book Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom.

The interview tapes and transcripts (1972-1978, undated), which comprise the bulk of the collection, include interviews with government officials, participants in the North Carolina civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and opponents of the movement, including members of the Ku Klux Klan. The few research files in the collection include statistical data related to Greensboro elections (1930s-1950s), notes from the Joan Bluethenthal papers and a report by the North Carolina State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights on civil disturbances at Dudley High School and North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro, North Carolina in 1969.

The Audiotapes Series consists of two identical sets (one for preservation, one for use by researchers) of twenty-eight tapes containing oral history interviews. The Printed Material Series includes transcripts and/or notes on 67 oral history interviews, and three research files related to the civil rights movement and local politics in Greensboro.

Beyond the direct oral history materials, there is also a Writings and Research Series. It includes research notes for several chapters of Chafe's book in addition to newspaper clippings addressing topics such as Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination and the return of black veterans from the Vietnam War; an assortment of documents regarding the Black Panther Party collected by the Federal Bureau of Investigations' Counter Intelligence Program, and a number of publications produced by other authors. While the materials predominately relate to Greensboro, this series also includes information on civil rights activity in Durham, Chapel Hill, and the Research Triangle at large. The Photographs Series includes fourteen undated photographs.

William H. Chafe's book, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom, chronicles the continuing conflict over desegregation in Greensboro in the 1950s and 1960s. Chafe explores the "progressive mystique" that defined the terms of culturally-sanctioned behavior, looking at how civility served to preserve the South's racial order. Within this context, he discusses the city's reaction to the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, the Greensboro sit-in movement begun by four college students at North Carolina A&T College in 1960, and the emergence of the Black Power Movement in the late 1960s.

3 results in this collection
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Series consists of 14 photographs located in the final folder of box 3. Photographs show Civil Rights demonstrators, law enforcement response, race relations in the South, and active protest. All photographs are undated with little information regarding subjects and locations, though three photographs are identifiably of Chapel Hill demonstrations.

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This series includes oral history interviews as well as 67 transcripts and notes (1972-1978 & undated) related to the civil rights movement in Greensboro, North Carolina. Compact discs of interviews as well as compact disc scans of all transcripts relating to interviews are available, filed by subject. This series also includes audio recordings of William Chafe's notes regarding interviews and his research, as well as transcripts on the Greensboro elections, notes on the papers of Joan Bluethenthal, and a report by the North Carolina State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights on civil disturbances at Dudley High School and North Carolina A&TState University in Greensboro.

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Roughly one-half of this series consists of Chafe's notes for Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom. Notes are divided by chapter. Also included in this series are photocopies of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Counter Intelligence Program documents pertaining to Black Panther Party members and chapters in Charlotte, N.C. and Oakland, C.A. Series includes reports and writings by others related to Chafe's book, a number of newspaper clippings, two interview transcripts of Ella Baker conducted by Sue Thrasher and Casey Hayden, and information on Civil Rights protests in Durham, Chapel Hill, Greensboro, and the campuses of North Carolina Central University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle papers, 1820-1927 and undated

Online
0.5 Linear Feet
Collection consists of an assortment of correspondence, fragments, and notes from Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle. Correspondents include Carlyle's secretary, Henry Larkin; John Fergusson; Thomas Murray; Basil Montagu; Bryan Waller Procter ("Barry Cornwall"); Henrietta Maria Stanley; Ralph Waldo Emerson; Thomas Erskine; Richard Owen; Frederic Chapman; William McCall; and John Reuben Thomas.

The collection consists primarily of the Correspondence Series, 1820-1927 and undated, between Thomas Carlyle, Jane Welsh Carlyle, and various other correspondents. Correspondents include Carlyle's secretary, Henry Larkin; John Fergusson; Thomas Murray; Basil Montagu; Bryan Waller Procter ("Barry Cornwall"); Thomas Erskine; Richard Owen; Frederic Chapman; William McCall; and John Reuben Thomas. Letters present not only a narrative of their own lives, but also provocative discussion of the ideas and events of their time, including the Peterloo Massacre of 1819, the coronation of Queen Victoria, the repeal of the Corn Laws, the Great Exhibition of 1851, the deaths of Sir Robert Peel and the Duke of Wellington, the Crimean War, and the rise of modern Germany. Also present are vivid references to the works and movements of noteworthy contemporaries such as Robert Browning, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Ivan Turgenev, and others. Most of the letters are outgoing from the Carlyles; there is also one letter dated 1860 April 25 from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Thomas Carlyle, asking Carlyle to sit for a portrait. There is also an August 1863 letter from Carlyle likely directed to Virginia devine and abolitionist Moncure Conway, who travelled to London in 1863 armed with letters of introduction from Emerson, his mentor. There are several letters from Jane Welsh Carlyle to Henrietta Maria, Lady Stanley of Alderley, discussing day-to-day life with numerous references to her husband, Thomas Carlyle. Also included is a fragment of a letter from Thomas Carlyle to his wife containing reference to Lady Stanley's little boy.

The collection also includes miscellaneous correspondence, such as one letter to Charles Kingsley promising to help Kingsley get his book published; one letter to James Aitkin; one to Sir Richard Owen concerning inviting O. M. Mitchel (an American astronomer) to lecture on the Mississippi at Somerset House; one letter from Walter Savage Landor prior to Carlyle's only visit with Landor; one letter from Carlyle to London publisher [Frederic] Chapman referring to two manuscripts by Mr. Meccall; one letter from Carlyle to Boehm; and one letter from Carlyle to John Reuben Thompson, as well as several pieces to or from unidentified correspondents. Also includes a letter from Carlyle to D. B. Brightwick at Greenwood College regarding teaching virtue by example (includes published transcription).

The Scrapbook Series consists of a volume of clippings and annotations on Thomas Carlyle's life and works compiled by his biographer, David Alec Wilson.

The Writings Series consists of manuscript fragments of Thomas Carlyle's Shooting Niagara: And After? and his History of Frederich II of Prussia.

The Photographs Series contains a photograph showing part of the Carlyles' study and an autographed a cartes-de-visite of Thomas Carlyle.

Consumer Reports. Colston E. Warne papers, 1910-1995 and undated

60.0 Linear Feet
Consumer Reports is a product testing and consumer advocacy nonprofit organization based in Yonkers, N.Y., founded in 1936. Colston E. Warne was an economist and consumer advocate who served as the first President of Consumers Union from its formation in 1936 until his retirement in 1980. The Consumer Reports Colston E. Warne papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, manuscripts and texts of articles and speeches, reports and other printed materials. Correspondents include Arthur Kallet, Dexter Masters, E. Scott Maynes, Edward Reich, James Mendenhall, James Morgan, Jean Whitehall, Leland Gordon, Morris Kaplan, Persia Campbell, Rhoda Karpatkin, Ruby Turner Morris, Walker Sandbach and William Pabst. Institutions represented include the American Council on Consumer Interests, Amherst College, Consumer Federation of America, Cooperative Distributors, Council of Economic Advisors, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (later Consumers International), League for Industrial Democracy, National Consumer Energy Advisory Committee, National Consumers League, National Recovery Administration and the University of Pittsburgh. Topics addressed include academic and intellectual freedom, communism and subversion, consumer and worker education, economics, labor and war-time advertising. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Consumer Reports Colston E. Warne papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, manuscripts and texts of articles and speeches, reports and other printed materials. Correspondents include Arthur Kallet, Dexter Masters, E. Scott Maynes, Edward Reich, James Mendenhall, James Morgan, Jean Whitehall, Leland Gordon, Morris Kaplan, Persia Campbell, Rhoda Karpatkin, Ruby Turner Morris, Walker Sandbach and William Pabst. Institutions represented include the American Council on Consumer Interests, Amherst College, Consumer Federation of America, Cooperative Distributors, Council of Economic Advisors, International Organization of Consumers' Unions (later Consumers International), League for Industrial Democracy, National Consumer Energy Advisory Committee, National Consumers League, National Recovery Administration and the University of Pittsburgh. Topics addressed include academic and intellectual freedom, communism and subversion, consumer and worker education, economics, labor and war-time advertising. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Ronald Anthony Cross papers, 1971-2019 and undated

9 Linear Feet
Ronald Anthony Cross was an American science fiction and fantasy author. Collection includes a wide array of Cross' creative work, including short stories and novelettes, poems, essays, song lyrics, novels, and copies of his published work. In addition there is research he conducted for his published books, and often material related to the publishing process, including tracking sheets, correspondence, contracts, reviews, and royalty statements. Material dated past Cross' death has to do with republishing agreements.

Includes a wide array of Cross' creative work, including short stories and novelettes, poems, essays, song lyrics, novels, and copies of his published work. In addition there is research he conducted for his published books, and often material related to the publishing process, including tracking sheets, correspondence, contracts, reviews, and royalty statements. Material dated past Cross' death has to do with republishing agreements.

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Includes primarily research Cross conducted for his published books. Among the material are style sheets; notes, lists, and questions regarding the works; photocopies of internet and other research completed, and reference materials. Includes some correspondence with publishers. There is a review of White Guardian, and a list of Cross' recommended readings.

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Includes a wide array of Cross' creative work, including short stories and novelettes, poems, essays, song lyrics, novels, and copies of his published work. Drafts and copy edited versions of his writings are often accompanied by a variety of other material, including Cross' tracking documents, correspondence, contracts, royalty payments, reviews, photocopies of the published piece, and other items related to the publishing process.

Richard Finkel Associates records, 1946-1987 and undated

15.0 Linear Feet
Advertising executive based in Seattle, Washington; specialist in newspaper advice columns and cartoon advertisements. Collection includes clip art, cartoon and comic designs, advertising copy, print advertisements and other largely humorous printed materials that feature advertising characters, limericks, "do it yourself" hints and advice columns, and fact- and quiz-based promotional copy. Newspaper advertising services were primarily directed at local businesses including apparel and shoe stores, appliances and home furnishings, automotive dealerships and service firms; hardware stores, hotels and restaurants, insurance and real estate companies, sporting goods and travel agencies primarily in the Pacific Northwest and Canada. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Leah Fritz papers, circa 1950-2009 and undated

17 Linear Feet
Leah Fritz is an American feminist poet and author. Although she was born in the United States, Fritz has been active in England since she moved there in 1985. The Leah Fritz papers contain correspondence and subject files; writings, including notebooks and diaries, drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews; and audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings. Materials range in date from circa 1950 to 2009.

The Leah Fritz papers are organized into three series. The Personal Papers series contains Leah Fritz's correspondence and subject files. The Writings Series contains Fritz's notebooks and diaries as well as drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews. The Audiotapes series contains audiocassettes of presentations and poetry readings by Fritz and other recordings.

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The Writings Series contains Fritz's notebooks and diaries as well as drafts, published articles, and papers related to the publication of Fritz's prose writings, poetry, and book and article reviews. The Notebooks and Diaries subseries contains Fritz's diaries, notebooks, address books, and other volumes. Most of the volumes contain irregular diary entries, reflections, poetry drafts, and drawings. The Prose Subseries contains drafts and published versions of Fritz's essays, articles, letters to the editor, and other prose pieces. The bulk of these materials predate Fritz's emigration to England. Included in this series are drafts of Fritz's book, Dreamers and Dealers: An Intimate Appraisal of the Women's Movement. Also included are clippings, notes, and editorial comments on Fritz's work and an article submission index tracking the publications and journals to which Fritz submitted her writings. The Poetry subseries includes poetry manuscripts; drafts and proofs of Fritz's published poetry anthologies, including From Cookie to Witch is an Old Story, Going, Going..., Somewhere En Route - Poems, 1987-1992, The Way to Go, and an apparently unpublished collection of poems, Bureau de Change; materials related to the publication of Touching the Sun, an anthology dedicated to the memory of poet Adam Johnson, edited by Fritz; and other papers. The Book Reviews subseries contains drafts and published versions of Fritz's reviews of books, articles, and poetry.

Abortion Rights Association, Inc., photographs and pamphlets, 1972-1974 and undated

1.0 Linear Foot
Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated

1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items
Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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Series comprises a few printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Erwin Cotton Mills records, 1832-1976 and undated, bulk 1892-1967

156 Linear Feet — 357 volumes; 66 boxes; 6 oversize folders.
Account books, nearly complete, and office files, very incomplete, of the Erwin Mills textile mill, chiefly 1892-1967, and some personal papers of William Allen Erwin. The business files include letters, volumes, legal and financial papers, memoranda, printed material, reports, blueprints, and other records of the company.

The records of the Erwin Cotton Mills, a textile manufacturing company, date primarily from 1982-1967 but include items as early as 1832 and as late as 1976. There are ten series: Information; Account Books; Alphabetical; Labor Relations; William Allen Erwin; Pearl Cotton Mills; Cooleemee Cotton Mills; Erwin Yarn company; and J. N. Ledford Company. The collection relates mostly to the company's textile operations and related matters, but there is also some material concerning William A. Erwin's personal and family interests. The account books are largely intact. Most of the correspondence and topical records have not survived and are represented here only by scattered files. Records from the subsidiaries and acquired companies vary but have survived in similar fashion. the Account Books Series and Alphabetical Series comprise the bulk of the collection.

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The Labor Relations series focuses upon the company's relationship with its workers, the Textile Workers Union of America, and the federal government. Files largely date from the late 1930s and early 1940s. The series documents strikes and extensive negotiations with employees, as well as contracts, memoranda, correspondence, wage charts, labor agreements, and other materials. There is also material from the United Textile Workers challenging the Textile Workers Union of America in 1951 and 1952.

Cause Marketing Forum. Halo Awards Records, 2002-2012 and undated, 2002-2012 and undated

82.0 Linear Feet
Professional organization founded in 2002 by David Hessekiel to promote business-nonprofit collaboration and corporate sponsorship of social service campaigns. Halo Awards were established in 2003 to celebrate notable cause marketing campaigns.le endeavors by businesses.

Collection spans 2002-2012 and includes correspondence, entry forms, audiovisual materials, artifacts, written reports and other materials that document businesses entering the awards competitions for social service and humanitarian projects. Companies and charities represented include the American Cancer Society, American Red Cross, Boys and Girls Clubs, Children's Miracle Network, Ford, Kohl's, Komen Breast Cancer Foundation/Komen for the Cure, Macy's, Procter & Gamble, Target and Toys for Tots. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Alexander Sprunt and Son records, 1779-1960

6082 items
Cotton firm from Wilmington, N.C., that for a short period was probably the largest cotton exporting house in the United States. Collection includes account books, ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase and sales journals, inventories, other subsidiary books, and some office files and correspondence. Goods were purchased from the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas, and other states and processed in the firm's compress facilities and sold to Great Britain, France, Germany, and elsewhere in Europe.

The collection consists of an extensive, but incomplete, set of account books, remnants of the office file and James Sprunt's correspondence (personal as well as business letters and papers), and pictures. Among the account books there are long series of ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase books, and stock inventories that document the company's operations between the 1870s and 1950s. The ledgers date between 1889 and 1952, and there are private ledgers for 1907 through 1931. The volume of minutes covers 1919-1930, but there are a few others among the offices files along with financial statements, 1885-1915, important legal documents of the partnership and corporation, and assorted other papers.

Correspondence and other papers of James Sprunt and the company date between 1884 and 1952, but they are numerous only for 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921. The letters date mostly to 1904-1910, and 1919-1921, and are largely files of James Sprunt, reflecting his activities in business and interests in secular and theological education, the Presbyterian church in the U.S., and North Carolina history. Notable correspondents and subjects are Alexander Sprunt (1815-1884), Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), Alexander Sprunt (b. 1898), James Sprunt (1847-1924), Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, Francis Herman Packer, John Miller Wells, John Campbell White, Edward Jenner Wood, The Laymen's Missionary Movement, and the Presbyterian mission at Kiangyin, China. Account books, minutes, and correspondence are available also for a number of domestic and foreign subsidaries and branch offices, but these are often quite fragmentary. More than thirty pictures, mostly photographs, illustrate the firm's staff, workers, physical plant, and employees as well as other scenes.

Also included are some papers representing various domestic and foreign subsidiaries and branch offices, especially Champion Compress and Warehouse Company, the Wilmington Compress and Warehouse Company, Alexander Sprunt & Son (of Delaware, a holding company), and the company's offices in New York City and Le Havre, France.

Information about the company's history can be found in: James Sprunt's letters of Nov. 6, 1908; Apr. 9, 1909; Jun. 7 and Oct. 22, 1919; an article in Wilmington's Morning Star from Feb. 11, 1921; and Dictionary of American Biography.

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The Pictures Series includes both photographs and illustrated pictures and advertisements. The majority of photographs are of the Alexander Sprunt and Son employees and facilities in Wilmington, N.C., and include the main office building on Front and Walnut Streets; office staff, including some photographs of the Sprunts; the Champion Compress and Warehouse facility; the S.S. Winston Salem (1920). The series also includes portraits and photographs of the Sprunt family both in Wilmington and abroad. Other images in the collection are: postcards and advertisements, as well as a set of photos by Cirkut Photos by Coovert in Memphis, Tennessee.

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The company's nomenclature for some of the account books was not apparent, and it was necessary to substitute titles that it is hoped are approximately accurate, if not always precise. In addition, there was some difficulty in distinguishing between those volumes that belonged to the main office at Wilmington and those that belonged to other offices and subsidiaries. The company was a complex operation, and its accounting procedures changed over the years. Many volumes did not have labels.

Chris Kraus collection of Kathy Acker papers, 1971-2017 and undated

17 Linear Feet
Chris Kraus is a writer and filmmaker who is also the co-editor of the press Semiotext(e). In 2017, she published After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography (Semiotext(e), 2017). This collection is comprised of the materials she created or amassed in the process of writing that book.

The Chris Kraus Collection of Kathy Acker papers is comprised of materials Kraus created or amassed in the process of writing her biography of Kathy Acker, After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography (Semiotext(e), 2017). The collection includes emails between Kraus and Acker's friends and colleagues; copies of manuscript material (primarily letters) from Acker gathered by Kraus from research libraries and private collections (very few of which duplicate materials in the Kathy Acker papers held by Duke) ; audio recordings of interviews between Kraus and Acker's associates, accompanied by transcriptions; Kraus's research notes, compiled quotes, and other research materials; collected press and reviews of Acker's work; typescripts and published works by and about Acker; Acker's financial records pertaining to expenditures, earnings, inheritances, and real estate; chapter drafts of Kraus's book; and a small amount of print ephemera and original photographs.

Interviewees and correspondents include: Lynne Tillman, Dennis Cooper, Gary Pulsifer, Amy Scholder, Neil Gaiman, Janey Smith, Dodie Bellamy, Robert Gluck, Stuart Home, P. Adams Sitney, Alan Sondheim, Eleanor Antin, Martha Rosler, and many others.

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Materials in the first eight boxes include research files, interviews, correspondence, chapter drafts and other materials related to all of the chapters in After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography except the first chapter of that book, "Littoral Madness." The final box in this series includes typescripts for all chapters plus style sheets, footnotes and related material.

Percy E. Ryberg papers, 1906-1991

6 Linear Feet — 11 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Collection primarily comprises New York psychiatrist Percy E. Ryberg's personal family correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers, some of which speak to Ryberg's youth in Argentina. Professional correspondence, articles, and other items document his career and interests in sexual and mental health, substance abuse treatments, identity, spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine, and other topics, and the publication of his book, Health, Sex, and Birth Control. Also includes biographical and genealogical information; photographs and photograph albums; and glass plate negatives. Acquired by the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The collection consists primarily of psychiatrist Percy Ryberg's personal correspondence (in particular with his wife, Barbara), diaries, and other personal papers (1908-1991), some of which speak to his youth in Argentina. Ryberg's career as a physician and psychiatrist is represented through professional correspondence, writings, and medical research material. The material includes articles on the treatment of alcoholism in the mid-twentieth century, the publication of his book Health, Sex and Birth Control, and research on histamine reactions on the skin. Other topics that may be mentioned in the papers include mental health treatment, gender identity, schizophrenia, and spiritual and astrological aspects of medicine. There are also clippings and correspondence relating to the trial of William Koch (1940s), a U.S. physician who claimed to have developed a cure for cancer.

The collection also includes photographs (1906-1990s), mostly family snapshots and professional portraits of Ryberg, and photograph albums documenting Ryberg's travels and career. Glass plate negatives bear images of diplomas, and a military portrait of Ryberg from 1942.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. 16mm Microfilm Investigations, 1913-1950 and undated

3 Linear Feet — 53 items
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The JWT 16mm Microfilm Investigations span the years 1913-1950 and consist of research reports, market studies, account histories, office overviews, campaign studies and other investigative documents. Clients include Andrew Jergens, Ballantine, Corning, Kodak, Emerson Drug, General Cigar, J&J Colman, J.B. Williams, J.P. Stevens, Johns-Manville, Lehn & Fink, Lever Brothers (Unilever), Lorillard, Northam Warren, Penick & Ford, Pond's, R.T. French, Scott Paper, Standard Brands and the U.S. Marine Corps. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The JWT 16mm Microfilm Investigations span the years 1913-1950 and consist of research reports, market studies, account histories, office overviews, campaign studies and other investigative documents. Clients include Andrew Jergens, Ballantine, Corning, Eastman Kodak, Emerson Drug, General Cigar, J&J Colman, J.B. Williams, J.P. Stevens, Johns-Manville, Lehn & Fink, Lever Brothers (Unilever), Lorillard, Northam Warren, Penick & Ford, Pond's, R.T. French, Scott Paper, Standard Brands and the U.S. Marine Corps.

J. Walter Thompson Company. 16mm microfilm Treasurer's Office records, 1916-1949 and undated

3.0 Linear Feet
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. It is headquartered in New York. Collection includes correspondence, bills, approvals and releases, lists of stockholders, estimates, wage cards, legal files (lawsuits, judgments, claims), insurance documents and other printed materials. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection includes correspondence, bills, approvals and releases, lists of stockholders, estimates, wage cards, legal files (lawsuits, judgments, claims), insurance documents and other printed materials. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

J. Walter Thompson Company. 35mm Microfilm Proofs, 1906-1960 and undated

3 Linear Feet — 104 items
Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The JWT 35mm Microfilm Proofs collection spans the years 1906-1960 and consists primarily of images of print advertisements and proofs taken from proof books and portfolios of domestic and foreign JWT offices. Clients include Ballantine's, B.F. Goodrich, Butterick, Corning, Crowell Publishing, Davey Tree Surgeons, General Cigar, General Motors, Guinness, Horlicks, J.B. Williams, Jergens, Johns-Manville, Nash, Northam Warren, Pennsylvania RR, RCA, Sharp & Dohme, Shell, Standard Brands, Sun Maid, Swift, Sylvania, United Airlines, Ward Baking, and Welch's Grape Juice. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The JWT 35mm Microfilm Proofs collection spans the years 1906-1960 and consists primarily of images of print advertisements and proofs taken from proof books and portfolios of domestic and foreign JWT offices. Clients include Ballantine's, B.F. Goodrich, Butterick, Corning, Crowell Publishing, Davey Tree Surgeons, General Cigar, General Motors, Guinness, Horlicks, J.B. Williams, Jergens, Johns-Manville, Nash, Northam Warren, Pennsylvania RR, RCA, Sharp & Dohme, Shell, Standard Brands, Sun Maid, Swift, Sylvania, United Airlines, Ward Baking, and Welch's Grape Juice.

Robert Ward papers, 1910-2012 and undated

137 Linear Feet
Robert Ward was a composer primarily of operas, instrumental works, and symphonic choral works. He won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his opera, The Crucible, which remains his best-known work. Ward served as Chancellor of the North Carolina School of the Arts and as a faculty member at Columbia and Duke Universities. His papers span from his time as a student at the Eastman School of Music in the 1930s to his final years composing in 2012. They include scores, music sketches, recordings, libretto drafts, correspondence, scrapbooks, research and information files, writings and speeches by and about Ward, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, and other materials that document his professional life and work as a composer.

The Robert Ward Papers have been divided into eight series: Biographical Materials, Correspondence, Operas, Instrumental Works, Vocal Works, Music Sketchbooks and Student Works, Music by Others, and Untitled Recordings. Biographical Materials consists of documents pertaining to Ward's work as a composer, including newspaper clippings, profiles, the composer's published writings and interviews, documents from the organizations with which he affiliated, events held in his honor, and certificates and awards he received. The Correspondence series primarily consists of professional communications between Robert Ward and several organizations. Ward's music has been divided into three series based on genre and arranged alphabetically by title of piece within each series: Operas, Instrumental Works, and Vocal Works. Materials for each composition may include scores, recordings, and publicity materials such as newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews. Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Ward, as well as manuscripts for some of his student works. Music by Others includes a variety of scores and recordings by other composers included in Ward's papers, the majority of which are recordings. Untitled Recordings comprises assorted media that contain no composition titles, although some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances.

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Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Robert Ward, some of which may be related to later published works. Also includes score and parts to Ward's withdrawn work, his 1st String Quartet (not to be confused with his First String Quartet from 1966), and libretto drafts to a work entitled The Tragic Muse. Also contains various contrapuntal exercises from Ward's time at the Eastman School of Music, as well as orchestrations of works by J.S. Bach and Claude Debussy. Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

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Contains assorted media that contain no composition titles. Recording titles are taken from the media objects themselves. Some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances. Includes audiocassettes, compact discs, digital audio tapes, reels, and VHS tapes. Listed alphabetically by recording title; physically sorted by format.

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Operas contains a variety of materials related to each of Robert Ward's nine completed operatic works. All of the compositions include an assortment of newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews from their performances. Clippings, programs, and reviews related to The Crucible are by far the most extensive. Almost all the operas have music sketches, libretto drafts, published libretti, piano-vocal scores, orchestral scores, conductor's scores, some individual instrumental parts, and both audio and audiovisual recordings. Media types include audiocassettes, compact discs, digital audio tapes, DVDs, reels, and VHS tapes. The scores include published versions, edited proofs—many in Ward's own hand—master sheets, printing masters, and original manuscripts. Several of the operas also include correspondence from Ward regarding revisions and performances, as well as production photographs, academic publications with musical analyses, set drawings, and stage directions. The materials for Roman Fever include a filming script. The series also includes libretto drafts for an unfinished opera entitled Debs. Recording titles are taken from the media objects themselves. Arranged alphabetically by opera title.

Video for Social Change Oral History collection, 2014

Online
0.5 Linear Feet — 1 hard drive (191GB) , 1 folder, 1 googledrive link
Video for Social Change was a documentary film course taught by Bruce Orenstein at the Center for Documentary Studies in the spring of 2014. The collection includes eight interviews, with North Carolina social justice activists James Andrews, Rukiya Dillahunt, Anita Earls, Angaza Laughinghouse, Dani Moore, Allison Riggs, Melinda Wiggins, and Mel Williams. The materials in the collection include camera footage in AVCHD format, edited master videos in MP4 format, transcripts, and releases for eight interviews.

Video for Social Change was a documentary film course taught by Bruce Orenstein at the Center for Documentary Studies in the spring of 2014. Focusing on the production of advocacy videos for social change, the course introduced knowledge and skill sets needed to make effective videos for grassroots organizations, exploring how video is integrated into organizing strategies to achieve better results. Student projects consisted of video oral histories with social justice advocates in North Carolina, including James Andrews, Rukiya Dillahunt, Anita Earls, Angaza Laughinghouse, Dani Moore, Allison Riggs, Melinda Wiggins, and Mel Williams. The materials in the collection Include raw footage, edited projects, transcripts, and releases.

1 result in this collection

Major General Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey photograph albums of service in South Korea, 1959 July-1960 May

1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 3 volumes
Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey was a U.S. Army three-star general who served in South Korea from 1959-1960 as Senior Military Advisor to the Korean National War College in Seoul, South Korea. The three spiral-bound albums house over 300 black-and-white mounted photographs, chiefly in 4x5 and 8x10 sizes, all with typed captions and commentary. The images document the War College campus, Ramsey's quarters, South Korean and American officers in group portraits and in military meetings, dinners, and parties, as well as official tours and visits, including to the DMZ and a U.S. guided missile base; and visits to Seoul streets and tourist sites, rice fields and markets, and to Tokyo, Japan. Ramsey often appears in event photographs. There are a few snapshots of Ramsey's family. Also includes about 20 close-range photographs documenting the violence and bloodshed at student and civilian street protests in Seoul against President Syngman Rhee, known as the April Revolution of 1960.

The three spiral-bound photograph albums in the collection were assembled by U.S. Army Major General Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey, and feature over 300 black-and-white gelatin silver mounted photographs, chiefly in 4x5 and 8x10 sizes, with typed captions and commentary by Ramsey about people, events, and settings. The albums measure approximately 11x13 inches. The photographs, mostly taken by Ramsey but also by other unidentified individuals, chiefly focus on Ramsey's service and travels, and include images of the National War College (renamed the Defense College in 1961) and its personnel; many meetings, dinners, and parties attended by South Korean and U.S. military officers and attaches; official military visits to the DMZ and to U.S. installations, including the newly developed guided missile system base. One set of images documents Military Armistice Commission (MAC) meetings held in August and October 1959 between North and South Koreans and American military officers. Ramsey often appears in snapshots of social events and meetings. Other images document Seoul streets, parks, palaces, markets, a women's school, and rice fields; and scenes from trips to Inchon, South Korea, rural areas, and Tokyo, Japan.

The album includes about 20 close-range photographs of violent student riots and civilian street demonstrations in Seoul against President Syngman Rhee, known as the April Revolution of 1960. The photographer is unidentified. Note: these photographs include potentially disturbing images of bloodied and dying demonstrators, and street violence.

3 results in this collection
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Box 3

This album includes approximately 134 photographs with typed captions and commentary. They chiefly document South Korean and American military personnel during meetings, relaxing in quarters, and posing for snaphots and group portraits. Events documented include the Korean Military and Naval Academies graduations. There are also many images from touristic trips to towns, to the Chang Gyung Won (Changgyeong Palace) Gardens, and to Tokyo, Japan, just before Ramsey departed for the U.S. from Taiwan. The first photograph is the only color image in the collection - a snapshot of Korean children playing with a seesaw on the street. Included is a large brochure for the Atami Hotel in Tokyo as well as a publicity magazine about the Tokyo Tower, a record-height communications structure built in 1958.

On pages 6-8 there are twenty black-and-white images of the April Revolution in 1960, most taken at close range and which include potentially disturbing images of bloody and dead protesters and violent clashes with police. The photographer is unidentified. The two-week mass civilian protests, spearheaded by students protesting widespread vote-rigging in presidential elections by then-President Rhee Syngman, later led to the downfall of the Rhee government that had ruled the country for 12 years.

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Box 2

This album includes approximately 82 photographs with typed captions and some newspaper clippings, and dates from October 1959 through March 1960. It includes many group photographs of Korean and American military officers, including officials from the Chinese embassy, as well as many snapshots of then-Colonel Lloyd Ramsey. Other images show interiors at the National War College near Kisan, Korea, including the NDC library, auditorium, typing room, and leadership's offices. There is one photo of General Paik Sun-yup, Korea's first four-star general, who died at 100 on July 10, 2020. In Korea, Paik's death sparked a controversy on his pro-Japanese activities during the colonial period.

A small sticker on the cover is labeled "Orig. Honest John," referring to a newly-developed missile visible in several images during a visit to the 4th U.S. Guided Missile Command. Other visits were to Ewha University, a women's school, and to a market.

There are many images of dinners, meetings, and parties chiefly hosted by Korean military officials, along with Korean women referred to as "hostesses." There are some family snapshots of Ramsey's wife and children.

One clipping documents meetings of the U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group (PROV-MAAG-K) in 1959.

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Box 1

This spiral-bound album houses approximately 121 page-mounted and 5 loose sleeved photographs with typed captions and dates from July to October, 1959. Then-Colonel Ramsey came to Korea to serve as the U.S. Army advisor to the Korean National Defense College, near , South Korea, in July 1959.

The photographs are numbered. The first group is from Ramsey's first days at the National Defense College and includes shots of campus exteriors and interiors, and his quarters. There are images from side trips to rice paddies, the "Chang Duk Palace"(Changdeok Palace), Chang Gyung Won Gardens (part of present-day Changgyeong Palace), a visit by Miss Korea 1959, and August and October, 1959 Military Armistice Commission (MAC) meetings attended by North and South Koreans and U.S. personnel. There is a brochure and map of one of the palaces. Small panoramic shots of Seoul are included.

Many group photographs of officials are present. There is one image of Major General Lloyd Ramsey where he is described as a new Senior Advisor of the National Defense College in the Korean Republic. There are also images of Korean Generals Kyung Nok Choi, Lim Hang Bak, and Woo Joo Chang.

Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Photographs, late 19th century 2 items — 1 box

Two albumen photographs on large card mounts, showing views of two ancestral homes. Also found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture Collection, probably separated from the Knight collection: a copy of a miniature of John Knight painted by Hugh Bridgeport in 1832; a photograph of Frances Z.S. Beall Knight; and photographs of Knight and of his tombstone in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, Maryland.

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Genealogy, after 1957 and undated 3 items — 1 folder

Genealogical files contain a hand-drawn family tree for Henry McCleery and Martha Ritchie, whose children married into the Beall and Knight families; it includes geographical data, and the names of John Knight and Frances Beall, first cousins.

Other items consist of a typewritten document that gives the history of the McCleery, Ritchie, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Maryland to the tenth generation, and a typewritten document that outlines descendants of James Beall Sr., Maryland, to the eleventh generation.

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Diaries, 1846-1892 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Series consists of diaries and notebooks, almost all written by Frances Beall Knight (21), with some by John Knight (4), and Fanny Knight (10)). Most are small bound volumes, but a few are larger in size.

The Frances Beall Knight diaries span the years 1845-1865; and an anomyous 1892 diary has also been identified as hers. Other anonymous volumes in the collection have not been identified but may also be hers. The earliest diaries describe in detail of life in Natchez, Mississippi, chiefly commenting on the weather, illnesses, visits, and other aspects of daily routine; there are also many passages concerning religion and religious activities, as well as comments on the Mexican War, guncotton, the use of electrictiy, and the telegraph. A large group of the volumes relates to several visits made by the Knight family to Europe, chiefly to cities and resorts in France, Switzerland, and Italy, between 1850 and 1864, as well as a visit to Egypt, Turkey, and Russia. In the last volume, from 1892, an elderly Frances Beall Knight describes life with her grandchildren, who were at that time also her wards.

The Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight diaries, written by the young daughter of John and Frances Knight from 1852 to 1864, also describe daily life and travels in Europe, although in less detail; in 1864, Fanny describes the circumstances of her father's death in Biarritz, France.

The notebooks and diaries of John Knight from 1850 to 1856 contain financial notes, hotel lists, and travel expenses.

This series houses six anonymous diaries, dating from 1867 to 1883, which are likely by Knight family members, some possibly by Fannie's husband Thomas A. McDannold (1835-1883).

Center for Documentary Studies, SNCC Legacy Project Critical Oral Histories Conference Interviews, 2016-2018, 2016-2018

260 Files — MP4 video files, JPEG image files, MP3 audio files, PDF text files, and plain text files. — 75 Gigabytes
Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The 2016 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on "The Emergence of Black Power, 1964-1967," while the 2018 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The Critical Oral Histories Conference in 2016 and 2018 were an extension of the SNCC Legacy Project that placed SNCC veterans in conversation with scholars using primary source materials. The events were produced by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the SNCC Legacy Project. Series One contains the 2016 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the years 1964-1967, to discuss the emergence of "Black Power" as an ideological concept as well as political and economic framework. Participants included Charlie Cobb, Courtland Cox, Gloria House, Phil Hutchings, Jen Lawson, Charles McLaurin, Cleve Sellers, Shirley Sherrod, Karen Spellman, Judy Richardson, Maria Varela, Geri Augusto, Emilye Crosby, Worth Long, Hasan Jeffries, Betty Mae Fikes, Bertha O'Neal, John O'Neal, Michael Simmons, and Zoharah Simmons. Series Two contains the 2018 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with participants including Phillip Agnew, Geri Augusto, Rebecah Barber, Kenneth A. Campbell, Charles Cobb, Courtland Cox, Emilye Crosby, Amber Delgado, David (Dave) Dennis, Sr., Ajamu Dillahunt, Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Timothy (Tim) L. Jenkins, Edwin King, Dorie Ann Ladner, Jennifer Lawson, Danita Mason-Hogans, Miles McKeller-Smith, Charles McLaurin, Ambria McNeill, Aja Monet Bacquie, Janet Moses, Robert Moses, Edna Watkins Muhammad, Quinn Osment, Timothy B. Tyson, Hollis Watkins, and Curtis Wilkie.

History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s

Online
50 Linear Feet — about 850 items
Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects related to the history of medicine, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, urology, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models and figurines; and other objects such as apothecary jars, cupping glasses, infant feeders, a bas-relief memento mori, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes and stethoscopes, dating from the 17th to the 20th century. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include physician's medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); clinical equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models; and art objects such as apothecary jars, a bas-relief memento mori, a marble skull, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes, from a small monocular "flea glass" to mid-20th century models. Other early medical instruments and supplies include amputation saws, bleeding bowls, cupping glasses, hypodermic needles, infant and invalid feeders, lancets, opthalmoscopes, pill rollers, stethoscopes, syringes, and other items. A more unusual item - and one of the larger pieces - is an adult walker made of wood, dating perhaps to the 19th century or earlier.

There is also a large collection of early anatomical and diagnostic human models from China and continental Europe, in the shape of small, intricately detailed manikins. Most are made from ivory. Some feature removable anatomical parts, and female figures often include a removable fetus. There is also a model illustrating acupuncture points. Other instructional artifacts include glass slides used in medical school lectures.

Most of these objects were photographed by library staff; at a later time, digital images of almost all of the objects in the collection were added to the online Duke University Historical Images in Medicine database, linked in this collection guide. Many of the original black-and-white photographic prints are filed in the History of Medicine Picture File collection. See the Related Materials section in this collection guide for links to these resources.

Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Loy Connell Smith and Eunice Andrews Smith Bland papers, 1958-1999

2.5 Linear Feet — 1875 Items
Dr. Loy Connell Smith (1925-1968) and his wife, Eunice Andrews Smith (b. 1928), were Southern Baptist missionaries to Nigeria from 1959 through 1968. Collection includes family correspondence, photographs, hospital publications, and audiovisual material from the Smith family's time as missionaries in Nigeria. Contains information about the death of Dr. Loy Connell Smith in a car accident and the Smith family's subsequent return to the United States.

Collection includes family correspondence, photographs, audiovisual tapes and reels, and materials collected by the Smiths regarding their work at the Baptist Hospital. Correspondence has been sorted chronologically by year. Letters between Eunice Andrews Smith and her mother, Annie Wells Andrews, are restricted for 10 years (until 2022). More information about the history of the family can be found in the biographical and background files in Box 1.

The collection also contains a significant amount of information surrounding the Smiths' car accident and Dr. L.C. Smith's death in 1968. Materials on this event include correspondence, records and films of his funeral and memorial services, and materials about memorial funds and plaques in honor of Dr. Smith's service.

2 results in this collection

Civil Rights Movement and Wayside Theatre photographs, 1960s

0.2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 18 prints
Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial dramatic performance, circa mid-1960s, found in the archives of the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia. The Civil Rights prints typically include detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of injured and jailed demonstrators, police, bombed-out churches, and portraits of activists Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street rent protest leader Willie Williams. All the prints except one measure roughly 8x10 inches. Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial staged production.

The Civil Rights prints typically feature detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of bombed-out churches, injured and jailed demonstrators, police, and portraits of activist Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street housing protest leader Willie Williams. Some prints also bear a SNCC photo credit stamp with the organization's Atlanta address.

The second group consists of two contact sheets and seven prints showing an unidentified multi-racial dramatic or musical performance perhaps staged by the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia, or may possibly be related to the Garrick Players in Washington, D.C. or to the Free Southern Theater founded by SNCC. The time period appears to be the early 1960s.

All the prints except one are roughly 8x10 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

3 results in this collection
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Wayside Theatre, Early 1960s? 9 items — 2 contact sheets; 7 prints

The origins and setting of these unmarked prints are unknown, as is the photographer. They were discovered in a file cabinet at the Wayside Theatre in the small city of Middletown, Virginia, close to Washington D.C., which was a cinema built in the 1940s before its transformation in 1962 into a small community theater. It closed in 2013.

The seven glossy black-and-white photographs, all 8 1/8 x 10 inches, and two 8x10 contact sheets show groups of African American and white actors in the middle of an unnamed dramatic production. It seems to have included music; one of the actors holds a tambourine and actors appear to be singing. In some scenes the setting appears to be a church.

The performance may have been staged by the Wayside Theatre or possibly by the Garrick Players, the former home of the director of the Wayside Theatre; or it may be a Free Southern Theater production in Washington D.C. or some other locality. Judging by dress and haircuts, the date appears to be the early to mid 1960s.

Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing

Online
14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files
Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints in darkroom and inkjet formats, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, Barth's images document cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, through landscape and portraiture. Series include images from Central and South American countries to the Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; portraits of migrants and images of migrant services at Arizona/Mexico border stations; images from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; images of Syrian refugees and others in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints, darkroom and digital, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, the photographs document the cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, and her interest in portraiture. Series include The Americas, whose images range from Central and South American countries to Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; migrants and migrant services at the Arizona/Mexico border; the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; refugees in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War, in the city of Sarajevo. In addition to many portraits of individuals and families, there are also landscapes.

Areas represented in The Americas series include Bolivia; Patagonia, Argentina; the Bahamas; Foz do Iguaçu and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; El Salvador; Guatemala; Martissant, Cité Soleil, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Nicaragua; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Cusco, Peru. Includes images of people working, cooking, minding children, participating in local festivals, traveling, and playing. Several portraits feature people in traditional dress. The largest group of images was taken in Haiti, where Barth returned following the 2010 earthquake. These photographs include scenes of people among the rubble in Martissant and Port-au-Prince, as well as some portraits of hospital patients. The Americas series images are arranged alphabetically by country.

The two short digital videos were taken by Barth in South America and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Series consists of two subgroups, each representing a different project by photographer Petra Barth, exploring the natural and built environment as well as the human stories of the border crossing between Arizona and Mexico. Each series comprises photographic prints as well as associated electronic files.

The 57 black-and-white digitally printed photographs in the first subseries document border crossings, desert locations, and various services and shelters supported by the Comedor/Kino Border, ARSOBO/ArizonaSonoraBorder, and San Juan Bosco Albergue Para Immigrantes initiatives, in partnership with: BCA Border Community Alliance, FESAC Fondacioa Del Empresariado Sonorese, A.C. The prints measure 13x19 inches. Associated digital records include image files and one contact sheet.

The second subseries, entitled "Los Mochileros," or "The Backpackers," embodies 32 stark portraits of migrants, mostly men but also a few women, who are awaiting deportation decisions on the border between Arizona and Nogales. The prints measure 13x19 inches and are digitally printed. Associated digital records include book layouts as well as image files and Barth's statement's about the project.

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Market of the Heroes, Sarajevo, 2017 July 54 prints; 188 digital files

Series consists of 54 black-and-white inkjet prints, measuring 13x19 inches, along with associated digital files. The majority of the images are individual and group portraits of veterans of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, gathered in a Sarajevo city square in summer of 2017. There are also photographs of panoramic city views, street views, Jewish cemeteries, monuments, and buildings with bullet holes.

In addition to image files in various formats, the digital components include a Word document containing the photographer's statement about the project, as well as three pages of short biographies of each individual whose portraits are in the collection. A hard copy of this document accompanies the photographs in the box.

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Jerusalem / West Bank / Jordan, 2016-2017 6 folders — 1 box — 47 prints; 101 digital files

The 16 black-and-white digital photographs featuring the city of Jerusalem and the West Bank have as their focus buildings, streets, and inhabitants. The prints measure 13x19 inches.

The 31 black-and-white digital prints in Jordan were taken by Barth in refugee camps housing thousands of displaced people, mainly from Syria, but also from Iraq and Palestine. Portraits include men, women, children, and family groups, in their temporary housing and at refugee processing centers. The prints measure 13x19 inches.

The photographic prints in this series are accompanied by digital images files and the photographer's statement about displaced peoples, the refugee camps, and her project to document life there.

Tom Triman films, circa 1970-2010

2.5 Linear Feet
The Tom Triman Films are comprised of 132 super 8mm reels and one VHS videocassette, containing the productions of horror movie fan/historian/critic Tom Triman (1952-2010).

The Tom Triman Films are comprised of 132 super 8mm reels and one VHS videocassette, containing the productions of horror movie fan/animator/writer Tom Triman (1952-2010). The bulk of the reels are elements for larger works, which here include Butterfly Man, Gunfire and Holy Water, and Pentagram. The collection also contains several commercial films released on super 8mm film, including 2001 A Space Odyssey, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Frankenstein.

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Student Action With Farmworkers records, 1950-2020, bulk 1992-2016

Online
135 Linear Feet — 148 boxes
The records of the Durham, N.C. organization Student Action with Farmworkers comprise: administrative and event files; correspondence; reports, articles, and other publications; student project files; outreach and teaching materials; photographs, artwork, and scrapbooks; audio and video recordings; and materials related to labor organizing and protests across the U.S. Hundreds of student-led projects document through interviews, essays, photographs, videos, and other materials the lives of migrant farmworkers and their working conditions, mostly in NC but also in SC. Major themes in the collection include: history, working conditions, and abuses of migrant farmworkers in the U.S.; education and outreach efforts; housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development for migrant youth; grassroots theater; labor organizing and boycotts; and service learning. Materials are in English and Spanish. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Founded in 1992 in Durham, North Carolina, Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bring students and farmworkers together to learn about each other's lives, share resources and skills, improve conditions for farmworkers, and build diverse coalitions working for social change. The SAF records comprise: correspondence; meeting agendas; student projects; reports, articles, and other publications; event files; teaching materials; photos; scrapbooks; ephemera; and other documentation of SAF's programs. Materials relate more widely to immigrant and migrant worker issues, service learning, labor organizing, and protests and boycotts across the U.S.

The largest series (63 boxes) contains hundreds of individual SAF student projects directed by college-age students and interns as well as farmworker and migrant youths. Materials also include administrative files, many of which house intern applications. Project files typically contain recorded interviews, often with transcripts; essays; notebooks; artwork; poetry; audio and video recordings; theater materials; and photographs in analaog and digital formats. Some photograph albums and collages are also found here. Most of the projects took place in North Carolina but also in South Carolina. Umbrella programs include Into the Fields (ITF) and Levante. Major themes involve worker education, housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development; and grassroots theater as a tool for teaching and activism. Materials are in English and Spanish. Many other materials on SAF projects are found in the Administrative Series.

The large Administrative Files Series contains organizational records created or compiled by SAF staff and are organized in subseries for SAF projects, fundraising, general administrative files, organizations, and resource files (articles, fliers, and other publications).

The Printed Material Series contains Student Action with Farmworkers publications, SAF press coverage, student papers and theses, some children's books, and farmworker-related reports, articles, newsletters, data sheets, resource directories, and alerts from around the world.

The Joan Preiss Papers Series contains records related to an activist and long-time collaborator of SAF. Comprises a variety of printed materials, primarily articles and newsletters, as well as correspondence, protest ephemera, promotional material for unions and activist organizations, meeting notes, student papers, and photographs. The materials relate to migrants and farmworkers both in North Carolina and throughout the United States.

Finally, the Ephemera and Artifacts Series contains items such as posters, t-shirts, stickers, and buttons related to Burger King, Subway, Gallo, and Mt. Olive boycotts and protests. Some materials relate to protests and boycotts in other regions such as Florida and Western states. Also contains SAF publicity ephemera, and props and other materials from the Levante activist theater group.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Chiefly contains audio, visual, and digital material from Into the Fields, AIM, and Levante documentary projects created by interns and students. Typical content includes: theater recordings; recorded interviews; digital photographs; digital videos; artwork; and music and poetry.

A few items are more generally related to Student Action with Farmworkers events or resources rather than to student projects, such as a copy of the 1986 documentary film "Wrath of Grapes" about the Chavez and United Farmworkers campaign against dangerous working conditions for farmworkers.

Media formats in the collection include: VHS cassettes, cassette tapes, computer diskettes, mini digital video disks, mini-disks, one film reel, and many CDs and DVDs. Some but not all media have been migrated to a server; digital files are available on request.

Students also made use of an SAF server to upload electronic project files. These have not yet been transferred to the library collection.

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Online

Contains administrative and subject files organized under the following subseries: Projects, Fundraising, General Administrative, Organizations, Resource Files, and Photographs and Scrapbooks.

The General Administrative series houses administrative files which fall outside of the other categories: these include Board of Directors files, meeting minutes and agendas, finance and operations folders, events files, student and personnel policies, and outreach and correspondence files.

The Resource Files series contains chiefly articles on a wide variety of topics related to farmworkers and migrant workers.

Within subseries, groups and individual folders are organized alphabetically, with the exception of the Photos and Scrapbooks series, which is organized chronologically. Most titles were transcribed from the original folders; others have been devised by library staff.

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Series houses hundreds of files related to SAF's student-oriented documentary and leadership projects including AIM Farmworker Class, Into the Fields (ITF), and Levante. Some projects were created as part of Duke University Documentary Studies classes. Individual projects typically lasted one academic semester, one summer, or several weeks, and usually were carried out by one or two students.

Materials in this series are divided into three subseries: student and intern applications, SAF project administrative files, and student documentary projects (the largest subgroup).

The student and intern project files typically include a cover sheet, proposals, interview plans, essays or other narratives, creative writing, oral interviews, transcripts of interviews, digital and analog photographs, negatives, notebooks, handmade photograph albums, short videos, release forms signed by participants (interviewees), and other project materials. the release forms and other documentation ferquently include data on the migrants: ages, origination, and local addresses.

Privacy laws govern these and other records. In addition, some projects include instructions banning the use of migrant names by request of the participants.

Audiovisual/digital media have been removed to a separate series for preservation purposes. These may contain still images, document files, sound and video recordings, and artwork. Many folders contain transcripts or excerpts of interviews and printouts of photographs.

Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina oral history collection, 1981-2014

5.3 Linear Feet
The oral history video recordings, audio recordings, and transcripts in this collection were produced or collected by the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina (JHFNC) and historian Leonard Rogoff as source material for various projects related to the history of Jews in North Carolina. The collection consists of individual and group interviews of Jewish residents of urban and rural North Carolina, including rabbis. Topics discussed by interviewees include family and community history, religious education, participation in Jewish congregations, anti-Semitism and race relations the civil rights movement in North Carolina, World War II military service and the Holocaust, family businesses, and philanthropy. Interviewers include Rogoff, Robin Gruber, and Steven Channing.

The oral history video recordings, audio recordings, and transcripts in this collection were created or collected by the Jewish Heritage Foundation of North Carolina (JHFNC) and historian Leonard Rogoff as source material for various projects related to the history of Jews in North Carolina. The collection consists of individual and group interviews of Jewish residents of urban and rural North Carolina, including rabbis and elected public officials. Families represented include the Brenner, Cone, Evans, Kittner, and Samet families. Topics discussed by interviewees include family and community history, religious education, participation in Jewish congregations, anti-Semitism and race relations in North Carolina, World War II military service and the Holocaust, family businesses, and philanthropy.

The JHFNC projects for which the oral histories were created include the museum exhibit “Migrations: Jewish settlers of eastern North Carolina” (2000-2002), the book “A history of Temple Emanu-El: an extended family, Weldon, North Carolina” (2007), and the museum exhibit, documentary film, and book “Down Home: Jewish life in North Carolina” (2007-2012). Unaffiliated projects from which the JHFNC collected oral histories include the Duke University undergraduate honors thesis “From Pine Street to Watts Street: an oral history of the Jews of Durham, North Carolina” by Robin Gruber (1986), the oral history project of the 1986 Beth El Synagogue (Durham) Confirmation class, Rogoff’s book “Homelands: southern Jewish identity in Durham and Chapel Hill, North Carolina” (2001), and the Steven Channing documentary film “Durham: a self-portrait,” which shares video interview footage with “Down Home.” Some of the media on which the oral histories were recorded contain additional video footage used for "Down Home" or "Durham: a self-portrait."

The majority of the interviews were performed by Leonard Rogoff and volunteers from the profiled Jewish communities. Other interviewers include Robin Gruber, Steven Sager, Steven Channing, Sharon Fahrer, and Jan Schochet.

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Tom Rankin photographs and papers, 1977-2016

33.5 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 film reels — Approximately 13,650 items — 33.5 linear feet; approximately 13,640 items
Tom Rankin is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, folklorist, professor of art and documentary studies, and former director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Photographs from the South focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region, as well as portraits of individuals, including portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown, and Southern landscapes. An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes. Finished prints range from 8x11 inch contact prints to 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 large-format prints. Supporting materials include manuscripts, publications files, and two films, all deriving from Rankin's career and art practice. Includes a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work of Tom Rankin in this collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Southern photographs were taken from 1980 to 2007, and focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region; these prints form the largest series, "Sacred Space." Another body of work features portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown. A third body of work, "Portraits from the American South," offers views of Southern people, cultures, and landscapes in both color and black-and-white.

An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes.

Print sizes range from 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches, with many housed in window mats. Along with these prints, there are also 8x11 inch black-and-white matted contact prints. All titles were created by the photographer.

Selected photographs from this collection have been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and other locations. A selection of Rankin's photographs was published in a book, Sacred Space: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta (1993).

Supporting materials in this collection include a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of work from the Sacred Space series, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta," as well as paper records related to his career and art practice, including book publications and book layouts. Also in the collection are two motion films, Dance Like a River (1985), directed by Barry Dorfeld and Tom Rankin, and Four Women Artists (1977), directed by Bill Ferris.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Professional papers, including correspondence, writings, teaching materials, and other documents, stemming from Tom Rankin's long career in teaching and documentary arts, and serving as Director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Includes a digital audio recording of his opening talk on February 27, 2008 at the Duke University Libraries exhibit of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." This file has been mounted on the library server and is also available online through the Duke Libraries digital exhibits website. The papers have been given basic processing.

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Photographs from China, 2016 34 prints — 3 boxes

These black-and-white gelatin silver photographs were taken by Tom Rankin while in Kunshan, China in 2016 and printed by Rankin in 2018. Sizes of prints range from 11x14 (9), 16x20 (18), and 20x24 inches (3). Scenes include rural landscapes surrounding the Duke University Kunshan campus; canals and barges; a fish market; vegetable gardens tended by lone figures, often in the shadow of industrial structures; an abandoned theme park; and religious shrines.

South Africa documentary photographs collection, 1940s-circa 2013, bulk 1960-2013

45.0 Linear Feet — 49 boxes; approximately 1133 items
Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid, from about the 1940s to 2013, with most dating after 1960. Arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris, Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a series of work by Jeeva Rajgopaul. Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images portray political rallies; protests; forced removals; funerals; social gatherings such as dances and concerts; work and domestic life; the life of the elderly, the migrants, and the impoverished; and labor organizing and strikes. There are many portraits of individuals of all races and classes, well-known activists and politicians, as well as countless ordinary South African citizens. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle. There is a small amount of printed material, as well as a selection of digital image files and a digital audio file of an exhibit talk. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid from about the 1940s to 2007, with most dating after 1960. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle.

The prints are arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris and Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a separate but related series of work by photographer Jeeva Rajgopaul. Each project resulted in an exhibit and four of them produced books (one is only available in online form). The series and the work of each photographer are described in full in this collection guide.

Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images document events such as rallies, protests, forced removals, funerals, social gatherings and leisure pursuits, violence between Africans, and labor strikes and meetings. There are also many portraits of individuals and families: migrant workers, farm laborers, HIV positive individuals, affluent South Africans, domestic workers, protesters, and well-known activists and politicians of all races and parties.

The images take the form of black-and-white and color prints, chiefly gelatin silver and pigmented inkjet prints, with most measuring approximately 11x14 to 16x20 inches. There is a small amount of printed material documenting the Cordoned Heart exhibit, as well as selected digital image files, and a digital audio file of exhibit opening remarks.

Among the photographers in this collection are several whose individual bodies of work are also held at Duke: David Goldblatt, Cedric Nunn, and Paul Weinberg. Details regarding all the photographers are found in a biographical section in this collection guide.

Aquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Known photographers whose work is represented in this collection are: Paul Alberts (1946- ); Joseph Alphers (1949- ); Omar Badsha (1945- ); Rodney Barnett (1943-2000); Michael Barry (1954- ); Bee Berman (1949- ); Arthur Bolton; Basil Breakey; Julian Cobbing (1944- ); Michael Davies (1955- ); Gille de Vlieg (1940- ); Anne Fischer (1915-1986); David Goldblatt (1930- ); Jenny Gordon (1955- ); Paul Grendon (1954- ); George Hallett (1942- ); Dave Hartman; David Hemson; Steve Hilton-Barber (1962-2002); Lucky Sipho Khoza (circa 1965-1998); Paul Konings (1958- ); Lesley Lawson (1952- ); Chris Ledechowski (1956- ); Rashid Lombard (1951- ); Ben Maclennan (1956- ); William Matlala (1957- ); Jimi Matthews (1955- ); Roger Meintjies (1963- ); Gideon Mendel (1959- ); Eric Miller; Santu Mofokeng (1956- ); Daniel Morolong (1928-2012); Themba Nkosi; Cedric Nunn (1957- ); Billy Paddock; Berney Perez (1948- ); Myron Peters (1954- ); Lindeka Qampi (1969- ); Chris Qwazi; Jeeva Rajgopaul (1952- ); Wendy Schwegmann (1954- ); Guy Tillim (1962- ); Zubeida Vallie; Paul Weinberg (1956- ); Graeme Williams (1961- ); Jansje Wissema (1920-1975); and Giséle Wulfsohn (1957- ). There are also prints from an unknown photographer collected by photographer and film-maker Angus Gibson.

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The Other Camera, circa 1970-circa 2013 25 prints — 1 box — 13x19 inches

These 25 black-and-white and color photographic prints form part of "The Other Camera" project and exhibit, curated by Paul Weinberg, and offer a view of the many different styles and approaches of 20th century South African street photography. The images were taken by male and female photographers from the 1970s through the 2010s, and were produced in inkjet format by Weinberg, then archived, digitized, and exhibited with support from the University of Cape Town and Duke University. These images are a selection of prints from the exhibit; all of the images are available through the online e-book, The Other Camera (2014).

The known artists represented in this collection are: Lucky Sipho Khoza (3 prints); William Matlala (5); Lindeka Qampi (10); and one print by Paul Weinberg. There are also six prints from the work of an unknown photographer from Maribastad, Gauteng Province (near Pretoria), from the collection of photographer and film-maker Angus Gibson.

All of the images are portraits of black South Africans, men and women. Themes include street culture, township life, the individual gaze, human identity and status, South African families, and social conditions in South Africa.

The images are all inkjet prints measuring 13x19 inches, and were exhibited at Duke University in 2014.

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These prints by photographer Jeeva Rajgopaul were received along with the South Africa Documentary Photography collection. The 10 black-and-white portraits of South African men and women are untitled and undated, but were likely taken during the 1980s and 1990s. They measure approximately 11x14 inches. The individuals are unidentified but are likely to be chiefly activists, writers, and artists.

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Consists of 79 gelatin silver prints of images taken from 1981 to 1988 by South African phographers, many of whom were members of Afrapix, the collective photo agency that documented resistance to apartheid in the 1980s. The images originated with the Afrapix documentary project "Beyond the Barricades." The project resulted in an exhibit and a book, Beyond the Barricades: Popular Resistance in South Africa (1989), published in cooperation with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Afrapix photographers Omar Badsha, Gideon Mendel, and Paul Weinberg selected photographs for the book.

The photographs are unmatted, exhibit prints measuring approximately 11.75x16 inches. They document social and political protest in South Africa during the violent and bloody period of the 1980s; subjects include funerals, conflicts with police, death squads and vigilantes, rallies and demonstrations, and other political gatherings. Well-known individuals appearing in the photographs include Chief Buthelezi, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, President P.W. Botha, Mrs. Botha, Mrs. Tshabalala (wife of the mayor of Soweto), and activists such as Billy Nair and Dorothy Nyembe. Numerous anti-apartheid organizations are portrayed, including the African National Congress (ANC), the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), the Leandra Youth Congress, the Natal Indian Congress, the Black Sash Society, and the United Democratic Front (UDF).

The images were taken by twenty South African photographers, whose work is listed in this order: Omar Badsha, Julian Cobbing, Paul Grendon, Steve Hilton-Berber, Dave Hartman, Rashid Lombard, Roger Meintjies, Gideon Mendel, Eric Miller, Santu Mofokeng, Themba Nkosi, Cedric Nunn, Billy Paddock, Myron Peters, Chris Qwazi, Jeeva Rajgopaul, Guy Tillim, Zubeida Vallie, Gille de Vlieg, and Paul Weinberg. Most are represented by one or several prints, but Badsha, Mendel, and Weinberg contributed over a dozen images each. There are also a few prints whose photographers have not been identified.

The bulk of the photographs are described fully with captions and dates in the book Beyond the Barricades. Some of the photographs are also available as digital images mounted on the library server; please contact Research Services for access.

Margaret "Peg" Johnston papers, 1965-2020 and undated

8.5 Linear Feet
Abortion rights activist. Director, Southern Tier Women's Services in upstate New York. Former President of the Abortion Conversation Project; founder and past president of the National Coalition of Abortion Providers. Johnson was also one of the founders of the Abortion Care Network and Board President from 2008-10. Collection comprises primarily printed materials that document Johnston's work as an activist at the national level. Includes the abortion provider newsletter Feminist Caucus News (1989-1991), which later became Networks (1992-1998 and undated). In addition, there are copies of Johnston's counseling aids, including the workbooks Abortion: Which Method is Right for Me?; Pregnant? Need Help? Pregnancy Options Workbook; and A Guide to Emotional and Spiritual Resolution After an Abortion. There are order forms, advertising, and occasional publications associated with the workbooks and other items offered for sale; an article pro-choice political activism for the 1996 elections; a few letters, notes, and memos by Johnston, including two undated pages with her notes on the material's historical significance. Also includes a copy of Morgen Goodroe's Abortion Resolution Workbook, greeting cards, Religious Groups for Choice ephemera, and other abortion counseling information.

Collection comprises primarily printed materials that document Johnston's work as an activist at the national level. Includes the abortion provider newsletter Feminist Caucus News (1989-1991), which later became Networks (1992-1998 and undated). In addition, there are copies of Johnston's counseling aids, including the workbooks Abortion: Which Method is Right for Me?; Pregnant? Need Help? Pregnancy Options Workbook; and A Guide to Emotional and Spiritual Resolution After an Abortion. There are order forms, advertising, and occasional publications associated with the workbooks and other items offered for sale; an article pro-choice political activism for the 1996 elections; a few letters, notes, and memos by Johnston, including two undated pages with her notes on the material's historical significance. Also includes a copy of Morgen Goodroe's Abortion Resolution Workbook, greeting cards, Religious Groups for Choice ephemera, and other abortion counseling information.

Also included is a small amount of materials on Carl Wittman, primarily related to his activity with the Students for a Democratic Society.

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Collection comprises primarily printed materials that document Johnston's work as an activist at the national level. Includes the abortion provider newsletter Feminist Caucus News (1989-1991), which later became Networks (1992-1998 and undated). In addition, there are copies of Johnston's counseling aids, including the workbooks Abortion: Which Method is Right for Me?; Pregnant? Need Help? Pregnancy Options Workbook; and A Guide to Emotional and Spiritual Resolution After an Abortion. There are order forms, advertising, and occasional publications associated with the workbooks and other items offered for sale; an article pro-choice political activism for the 1996 elections; a few letters, notes, and memos by Johnston, including two undated pages with her notes on the material's historical significance. Also includes a copy of Morgen Goodroe's Abortion Resolution Workbook, greeting cards, Religious Groups for Choice ephemera, and other abortion counseling information.

Abraham Joshua Heschel papers, 1880, 1919-1998 and undated

162 Linear Feet — 319 boxes
אברהם יהושע השל היה מלומד והוגה דעות בעל שם בינלאומי, תיאולוג ופעיל חברתי ופוליטי. השל נולד בוורשה, פולין, נצר למשפחת רבנים חסידיים מיוחסת ולמד פילוסופיה בברלין. הוא גורש מפרנקפורט והגיע לוורשה ומשם עקר ללונדון ערב הפלישה הגרמנית לפולין. לאחר שהות קצרה בלונדון היגר השל לארצות הברית. בתחילה לימד בבית המדרש לרבנים של התנועה הרפורמית בסינסנטי, ולאחר מכן עבר לסמינר היהודי התיאולוגי בניו יורק שם שימש כפרופסור לאתיקה ולקבלה עד מותו בשנת 1972. בנוסף להשתתפותו הפעילה בנושאים של צדק חברתי ובדיאלוג הבין-דתי, היה השל גם מלומד ומורה רוחני ותרם תרומה חשובה למדעי היהדות. כהוגה דעות של הדת היתה מטרתו של השל להגביר ולהעמיק את התובנות הרוחניות של היהדות ובמהלך חייו השפיע על דורות של יהודים ולא- יהודים. הארכיון האישי של אברהם יהושע השל מקיף את השנים 1880-1998 ומתעד את חייו האישיים, האקדמיים והציבוריים. הארכיון כולל תכתובות, כתבים של השל ועליו, כתבי יד מודפסים, קטעי עיתונות, כתבים שיצאו לאור ומעט תמונות וחפצי קודש. האוסף מספק תובנות לזהותו של השל כמנהיג רוחני ומסביר כיצד היה מעמדו זה קשור בקשר עמוק לחייו האישיים והמקצועיים. האוסף מחולק לפי הנושאים הבאים: חומר מוקלט, התכתבויות, חומר אישי ומשפחתי, פעילות ציבורית, חומר מוגבל וכתבים. Abraham Joshua Heschel was an internationally known scholar, author, activist, and theologian. He was born in Warsaw, Poland into a distinguished family of Hasidic rebbes, and studied philosophy in Berlin, Germany. In 1938 he was deported from Frankfurt to Warsaw where he escaped to London just before the Nazi invasion. After a brief time in London he immigrated to the United States, first teaching at the Hebrew Union College and then at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America where he taught as Professor of Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972. In addition to his active participation in social justice issues and his interfaith work, Heschel was also a scholar and religious thinker who made significant contributions to Jewish studies. As a philosopher of religion, his goal was to make the spiritual insights of Judaism understandable and over the course of his lifetime influenced generations of Jews and non-Jews. The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life. The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings.

The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life, including his long-term involvement and leadership in social activism and other public activities, his reputation as a compelling and sought-after public speaker, and his far-reaching influence as a scholar and religious thinker. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life.

The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings. Heschel maintained a meaningful, yet complex filing system. To balance preserving the original order with making the collection as accessible to researchers as possible, several key elements have been added to the collection guide:

•Scope note at the folder level. In many cases folder titles in the collection were reused, abbreviated, in Hebrew, or did not exist. Short descriptions of folder contents have been included not only to provide context for the materials, but also to make distinctions between the varying titles.

•Supplied/enhanced folder titles. In the case of missing or abbreviated titles, supplied titles (in brackets) were created. For folder titles written in Hebrew, the original folder title was documented along with its transliteration and English translation.

•Language extent. There are varying degrees in the amount of language materials in each folder and oftentimes multiple languages are represented in a single folder. To assist researchers, each folder description includes a note identifying the language(s) and their extent in the folder, with the dominant language listed first. The absence of a note indicates that all materials in the folder are in English. The following language categories are used: "A few" indicates that 1-25% of the materials are in another language(s); "Some" 26-65%; "Most" 66-99%; and "All" 100%.

Additionally there was a large of amount of clippings included in the Heschel collection which were generally in fragile condition. Where possible, these clippings were photocopied for preservation purposes and the originals discarded.

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The Public Activity series chronicles Heschel's long-term involvement and leadership in social activism and other public activities. The materials reflect Heschel's wide-ranging interests and influence, including his role in the civil rights movement, his continuous efforts to build interfaith relationships, his passionate support for Jews in the Soviet Union, and his deep commitment and leadership in attempts to resolve the war in Vietnam. The Public Activity series contains five subseries: Civil Rights, Interfaith, Miscellaneous, Soviet Jewry, and Vietnam. Materials in each subseries are arranged chronologically.

Ku Klux Klan collection, 1916-1987 and undated

5 Linear Feet
Twentieth-century secret fraternal group held to confine its membership to American-born white Protestant Christians. Collection includes a broad range of Ku Klux Klan pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera regarding Klan membership, Anglo-American values, protests against African Americans, Communists, or non-Protestant people, and promotional Klan events. Early material highlights activities of the Women of the Klan in Pennsylvania during the 1920s, including their charity work and fundraising for the Klan Haven, an orphanage. This material also includes large panoramic photographs of 1920s Klan reunions. Later materials from the 1960s are largely from the Southeast and mid-Atlantic States, and include literature, flyers, and handouts on Klan history, segregation, school integration, Communism, Catholicism, and Judaism.

Collection includes printed materials, apologetics, membership solicitations, circulars, brochures, pamphlets, broadsides, periodicals, cards, ephemera, and realia. Items were produced and distributed by various chapters of the Ku Klux Klan, dispersed throughout the United States, but largely originating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region. The KKK Collection also includes several panoramic photographs, assorted issues of Klan and other hate-group serial titles, and audio materials.

Materials have been acquired from a variety of sources and over several decades. Most of the collection has been arranged according to the geographic origin of the materials. Different branches and factions of the Klan are represented, including the United Klans of America, Women of the Ku Klux Klan, the Invisible Empire of the KKK, the Mississippi Green Knights, and the Mississippi White Knights.

Notable items include: a petition for the incorporation of a Klan chapter in Fulton Co., Georgia, in 1916; panoramic photographs and a wallet with Klan membership cards from Charles D. Johnson, a Florida Klansman in the 1930s; 1920s order forms for Klan robes, fiery crosses, and other Klan administrative materials from the Women of the Klan; pamphlets, circulars, and other literature opposing the Civil Rights movement, desegregation, and school integration, collected in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the 1960s; and recruitment flyers for rallies in Maryland, Ohio, and Pennsylvania during the 1980s.

Other items were first distributed during a talk by C. P. Ellis to freshmen students at a Duke University dormitory in 1969. Items include a 45-rpm sound disc with the songs "Flight NAACP 105" and "High ride"; a flyer regarding protests against the playing of the song "Dixie" at student events; a membership form for the North Carolina chapter; and printed items, including God is the Author of Segregation (1967) and issues of The Fiery Cross.

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William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989

Online
115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

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Online

While traveling in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s, Gedney shot distinctive night-time scenes in California, Montana, New York State, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Tennessee. The images rarely feature people, but instead focus on buildings and houses, starkly portrayed, often with a car in the foreground.

Gedney began this night work early in his career, starting with a series of photographs of the Brooklyn Bridge taken about 1959. A few street scenes in Brooklyn were also taken at night. Later night photography - and among the few examples with people - are found in the India Series, where Gedney photographed people and animals sleeping out of doors in the city.

There are more night scenes scattered throughout other series, for example, in the all-night life on the streets of San Francisco. As Gedney did not view these as part of his Night project, he filed them in their respective bodies of work. To discover all of these instances in the online digitized collection or in this inventory, one can search on the subject term, "Night photography." Additional test prints from the Night work can be found in the Film and Development Tests series.

Gedney wrote about night photography in his many journals and notebooks, found in the Writings and Notebooks Series, and book maquettes for his Brooklyn Bridge and Benares night photographs are found in the Book Projects Series. Several of Gedney's "Night" images from India were also published in a layout entitled "Ritual and the river" in Aperture (1986); the issue is found in the Printed Materials series.

Prints in this series are arranged in rough chronological order.

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To earn enough income to support his independent photographic work following graduation from Pratt Institute, Gedney found work with several New York-based small businesses, including Watson Flour Products and National Bakeries, and later, several publishers, including Glamour and Time-Life, where he met Walker Evans. He also served as photographer at a few New York weddings and a first communion. The collection includes images from Gedney's commercial work in the form of finished prints, proof prints and contact sheets. Some images only exist in contact sheet format. FInished prints are found only for the St. Josephs and Social Security series (descriptions follow). There are no examples of work for Time-Life or Glamour.

In addition to the photographs in the Commercial Work series, records for many of these assignments are located in the Grants and Work Files and the Correspondence series.

One of Gedney's first serious commissions following art school came in the late 1950s from the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf in the Bronx, and involved creating the layout and illustrations for a promotional publication for the school. The hundreds of images of young students and their teachers in classrooms, testing rooms, and playgrounds reveal Gedney's already-evident skill with portraiture, as well as his empathy for the subjects. The large prints in this series are typically mounted on thin board, with most of the prints measuring 11x14 inches.

In 1969, Gedney was one of six photographers hired to document the work of the Social Security Administration (the group included Diane Arbus). He was assigned to the Hays, Kansas Bureau, and spent about a week photographing Social Security applicants, chiefly rural Kansas farmers, pensioner, and widowers, and the Social Security representatives in their offices and in the field. Although Gedney sent the negatives to the Social Security Administration, the contact sheets and photographs remain in this collection, along with a copy of the complete catalog of photographs taken by the six photographers, in the Printed Materials series.

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Files contain items such as passports, identification cards, a birth certificate, photographs, and other records and memorabilia. The largest group relates to Gedney's HIV-positive diagnosis and subsequent treatment and decline. Among the photographs are snapshots of family members that date from circa 1920, possibly from Brooklyn, and some from the 1940s. The rest date from the 1950s and are of Gedney and friends when he was in high school in Greenville, N.Y., and then an art student at Pratt Institute in New York. There is also a group of photographs of Gedney taken while he was teaching, and one large portrait taken by friend and photographer Lee Friedlander several years before Gedney's death. Series is arranged in alphabetical order by folder title.

A large amount of personal correspondence dating from the 1950s to the 1980s can be found in the Correspondence Series. Records pertaining to employment, finances, and professional achievements are located in the Grant and Work-Related Files and Financial and Legal Papers series.

Peter Sekaer photographs, circa 1937-1940

1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 15 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, sometimes including original photographer's numbers. Other markings sometimes include titles, locations, and dates assigned by former owners or the agency; and credit information.
Peter Sekaer (1901-1950) was a Danish-born American photographer. Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Sekaer from about 1937-1940, while working for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses. The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Danish-American photographer Peter Sekaer from about 1937 to 1940, who was working at the time for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses.

The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 inches to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches; some are mounted on board, the largest of which is 16 x 20 inches, but for the most part they are unmounted and 8 x 10 inches or smaller. Titles in this collection, if present, originate from the prints; if there is no title, a brief description has been provided by library staff.

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The fifteen black-and-white prints are arranged in date order, as sequenced in the donor inventory. All prints are marked on the backs with various legacy identifiers. Image titles, photographer's name, and locations are sometimes present. Titles in this collection, if present, originate from the print. If there is no title, a brief description is included in library staff notes.

Radio Haiti papers, circa 1934-2003, bulk 1968-2003

Online
80 Linear Feet — 197 boxes; 2 oversize folders; and digital photographs
Radio Haïti-Inter was Haiti's first and most prominent independent radio station from the early 1970s until 2003. Under the direction of Jean Léopold Dominique and Michèle Montas, Radio Haiti was a voice of social change and democracy, speaking out against oppression and impunity while advocating for human rights and celebrating Haitian culture and heritage. The Radio Haiti papers contain mainly the station's on-air scripts and research materials covering a wide variety of subjects. The Radio Haiti audio recordings are described in a separate collection guide.

Radio Haiti was based in downtown Port-au-Prince on Rue du Quai until 28 November 1980, when Jean-Claude Duvalier's government cracked down on the independent press and human rights activists. Radio Haiti was ransacked, and the station's journalists were arrested then exiled. Many, though not all, of the paper record from the 1970s were destroyed in the 1980 crackdown. Radio Haiti reopened after Duvalier fell in 1986, in a new building on Route Delmas. The station closed again after the 30 September 1991 coup d'état that overthrew President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, and reopened in 1995 after the democratic government was restored. As a result of the repression the station and its journalists endured, most of the materials in Radio Haiti's paper archive span 1986 to 1991, and 1995 to 2003, though it also contains extensive external print materials (mainly newspapers and magazines) that Jean Dominique collected while in exile from 1980 to 1986 and from 1991 to 1994.

"Radio Haiti materials" refers to documents created by Radio Haiti's staff. These are mainly on-air scripts, but also include notes and correspondence. "External materials" refers to materials created by outside sources, which were used for research purposes by Radio Haiti's staff. These include, but are not limited to, press (Haitian, Haitian diaspora, and international news outlets), press releases, petitions and open letters from grassroots groups and civil society organizations, reports and other publications, and government communiqués and decrees.

Allen-Angier family papers, 1843-1971

8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes
Collection contains correspondence, speeches, clippings, and printed material, chiefly relating to the career of George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, director of the U.S. Information Agency, and president of the Tobacco Institute. Includes material on the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Information Agency, U.S. foreign relations, India, Iran, the tobacco industry, and the cigarette smoking and health controversy. Also includes family photographs from the Angier house on Trinity Avenue in Durham.

Collection includes papers kept by Zalene Allen Angier which include correspondence, 1936-1969, largely letters from her brother George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, official of the Tobacco Institute, and trustee of Duke University.

Allen's letters describe his diplomatic career and personal matters, including foreign relations and social life in Greece, Egypt, and Iran in the 1930s and 1940s; the royal family of Iran; the Potsdam Conference; and customs of Saudi Arabia. Letters of the 1950s mention celebrities Allen met, such as Yehudi Menuhin and Aristotle Onassis; and relations of the U.S. with India and of Russia with Yugoslavia. Letters of Allen's wife Katherine Martin Allen reflect diplomatic social life.

Clippings relate to Allen's career as diplomat and as director of the United States Information Agency, to his family, and to his death.

Miscellaneous papers include invitations; White House dinner menus; press releases; a report, February 9, 1932, on Japanese-Chinese relations; articles by Allen; and other printed materials.

There are photographs of Allen and many acquaintances, including Marshall Tito, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Amjad All, Abba Eban, Wellington Koo, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John Foster Dulles, and William Fulbright.

Papers, 1945-1970, kept by George and Katherine Allen include letters from Eisenhower and Dulles about Allen's shift from the State Department to the USIA; a report on the political situation in Iran, January 21, 1948; correspondence on Egyptian-U.S. relations in the 1950s and the Henry A. Byroade scandal, the Cold War, the cigarette smoking and health controversy, and on Allen's speeches.

Enclosed with a letter from Allen of May 10, 1970, is a petition against slavery by the Baptist Church of Augusta, Maine, dated August 17, 1843.

There are files of speeches and related correspondence on Russia, propaganda, the space race, foreign policy, peace, the tobacco industry, India, Iran, UNESCO, and other topics.

There is material on the Dulles and Eisenhower oral history projects and on various honors and awards received by Allen.

Two scrapbooks contain clippings about Allen's career and family photographs. There is also a photocopy of his book-length manuscript reminiscence of experiences as Ambassador to Iran in the 1940s and 1950s; a letter from Josephus Daniels, 1940, commenting on Allen's review of Daniels' book, Tar Heel Editor; and a tape recording of Allen's address, 1967, to the Tobaccoland Kiwanis Club on the United States in the world.

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Joseph M. Scammell papers, 1910-1952 and undated

14 Linear Feet — 34 boxes; 2 oversize folders
Joseph M. Scammell (1888-1953) was a military historian, author, and educator. His papers comprise two main groups: military history education materials in the form of lectures, curricula, and other course materials, and published and unpublished writings by Scammell and others, chiefly articles and lectures on international and U.S. military history from Classical Greece to World War II. There are also files of personal and professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, maps, and diaries. Scrapbooks contain articles on World War II campaigns in Britain, Germany, Latin America, and Turkey.

The papers of military historian and educator Joseph M. Scammell comprise two main groups: military history education materials in the form of curricula, lectures, student assignments, and other course materials, and writings by Scammell and others, chiefly typed and handwritten manuscripts and published articles on international and U.S. military history from the Greeks to World War II. There are also smaller amounts of personal and professional correspondence, including letters from editors, printed materials, maps, and clippings. Scrapbooks in the Clippings Series contain articles on World War II campaigns in Britain, Germany, Latin America, and Turkey.

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Charles L. Abernethy Sr. papers, 1713-1972, bulk 1907-1959

85 Linear Feet — 160 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 60,855 items
Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. (1872-1955) was a Democratic Congressman representing eastern North Carolina from 1922-1935. His professional papers consist chiefly of correspondence and records from his law practice and legal cases, with smaller amounts of writings and speeches, financial papers, printed materials, diaries, and some personal papers, including early deeds. There is also a large group of photographs, photo albums, and clippings scrapbooks chiefly documenting Abernethy's political career. One album from 1907 contains postcards of Beaufort, N.C.; another contains photographs of a three-month Congressional trip to Alaska, 1923, and includes images of President and Mrs. Harding and a diary transcript of the trip. Other items include some papers of his son, Charles Laban Abernethy, Jr., also a lawyer, and a volume of his poetry.

The collection principally comprises a large series of correspondence and legal records accumulated by North Carolina lawyer and politician Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. during his tenure as U.S. Congressman. There are papers relating to the senior Abernethy's law practice and business dealings in Beaufort and New Bern, N.C. (including legal papers concerning land development in Carteret County, Cape Lookout, and Horse Island maintained by both father and son).

Other materials include deeds and other early papers, political speeches, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks of Abernethy's political career, a diary, and the Abernethy coat-of-arms. There are also papers assembled by Abernethy's son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., a lawyer in his father's firm, and a volume of his poetry.

A lare group of photographs and albums includes a photograph album containing snapshots the elder Abernethy took during a congressional trip to Alaska for three months of 1923 (including photographs of President and Mrs. Harding), as well as a typescript of his diary from the trip; and an album containing postcards of Beaufort, N.C, in 1907, featuring a celebration of either the 200th anniversary of the town's founding or the opening of passenger and rail service to the town (or both).

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Jesse Harrison Epperson papers, 1915-1959

0.25 Linear Feet — 1 box
Dr. J.H. Epperson (1889-1958) was a resident of Durham, N.C. and director of the Durham County Public Health Department. Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to his life and career. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings center around Durham public health and sanitation history in the early 20th century, including efforts to combat communicable diseases such as tuberculosis and venereal disease in both white and African American populations. Includes 19 black-and-white photographs, mostly local news photographs, among which are 1920s views of downtown Durham, N.C.; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915; portraits of nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and a 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial women.

Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to the life and career of Dr. J. H. Epperson, from his appointment in 1915 to the newly-formed Durham, N.C. Department of Health to his death in 1958. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings (1915-1958) center around Durham public health and sanitation history, including efforts by Epperson and his staff to establish regulations for the safe production of milk, and to combat typhus, polio, tuberculosis, venereal disease, and other infectious diseases among both white and African American populations in early 20th century Durham City and County.

The correspondence chiefly consists of a few congratulatory exchanges between Epperson and Wilburt C. Davidson, Dean of the Duke University Medical School, where Epperson held a teaching position, and condolence letters to Epperson's widow. There is also one personal letter written by Epperson to his daughter and son-in-law.

Also in the collection are 19 black-and-white photographs (1915-1958), chiefly 8x10 inch Durham Herald-Sun press photographs, whose subjects include early views of Durham, N.C., 1920s; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915 with Epperson and staff; portraits of Epperson in his offices and at meetings; nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and meeting and conference attendees, including a group attending a conference on preventing venereal disease. A nursing staff member who appears in several photographs with Epperson is an Elizabeth O'Kelly. Of note is a large 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial, standing with Epperson and several staff on a flight of steps outside the Durham County Courthouse, where the Health Department was located.

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The bulk of the photographs in this series were used to illustrate features in the Durham Herald-Sun newspaper. Although small in number, the photographs cover a wide range of decades, starting with three views of interiors of the Health Department labs (circa 1916), and a few images of downtown Durham, N.C. (1920). Editorial notes and occasional titles are penciled on the print versos. Of special interest is a large photograph dating from the 1920s of a large group of Durham-area midwives, mostly African American or multi-racial women, posed with Epperson and several of his staff. The photographs generally measure 8x10 inches.

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The photocopied clippings in this series offer many details on Jesse Epperson's career with the Durham, N.C. Health Department, including his leadership in campaigns to eliminate tuberculosis, typhus, polio, venereal disease (VD), and other infectious diseases, as well as the regulation of dairy production in the county. The clippings thus provide some insights into the history of Durham, N.C. public health and sanitation programs, and public attitudes towards health and safety.

Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976

3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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The series chiefly consists of a 137-page draft biography on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé, in typescript form, completed by art historian Marcia M. Mathews sometime around 1975, accompanied by 134 photographs of Barthé's sculptures, as well as a few family portraits.

The highly-researched biography covers the life and career of Barthé, from his birth in Mississippi in 1901 to his age at the time the draft was completed, 75 years, thus the estimated date of 1975 for the draft's completion. Appended are footnotes and a bibliography. The work offers many insights on Barthé's career and struggles as an African American artist; it also offers details about the community of friends who supported him, which included many gay artists and theater people. Although the work was unpublished as a monograph, Mathews wrote an article about Barthé in the South Atlantic Quarterly (#74, 1975) entitled "Richmond Barthé, sculptor.".

The rest of the series comprises 134 professional glossy photographs of Barthé's sculptures and a few paintings, almost all 8x10 inch gelatin silver prints. They typically include a title for the work penciled in on the verso in an unknown hand; less commonly, they include a date, probably of the work's completion, and occasionally, a photographer's name; in twelve photos the name is that of Eric Pollitzer of Hempstead, N.Y.

There are also color snapshots of Barthé in Florence, 1971, of what appears to be an early solo exhibit (1930s?), as well as early portraits of Barthé (1915, 1935), his mother, and stepfather.

Subjects for the sculptures are almost always Black figure studies such as males and female nudes, dancers, athletes, family groups, and busts; others are of commissioned sculptures of Black authors, inventors, celebrities, and other figures. There are also race-related themes and religious sculptures (Barthé was a practicing Catholic).

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Roger Fenton research papers and photographs, 1833-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The series includes research materials assembled by art historian Marcia M. Mathews on early English photographer Roger Fenton. The earliest date reflects a transcript of a letter from 1833 from Roger to his mother while he was at school.

Mathews does not appear to have published any work based on this research, and there are no drafts in the collection, although she seems to have been involved at some level in Helmut Gernsheim's book on Fenton, published in London in 1954. The dozens of letters to Mathews from Fenton family members (1940s-1957) mention this connection and may shed more light on it.

Other correspondence is from curators at various institutions where Fenton's photographs and papers were located, and from the photography lab where professional copies were made of his original photographs taken in the 1850s.

Included in the series are six 2 1/2 x 4" cartes-de-visite photographs of Roger Fenton and his family (wife and daughters), early 1860s. Other photographs are copies (circa 1940s) and include images of the Fenton home, Crimble Hall (Rochdale Borough, Lancashire, England), and of other family members. There appears to be an original unmounted albumen print of a full standing portrait, probably by Fenton, of his father-in-law (last name Maynard), as well as several copies of photographs by Roger Fenton (1850s). One modern copy photograph is of a sketch of Crimble Hall by Marcia Mathews.

Other items include a copy of a questionnaire about the Fenton family, created by Mathews in the 1940s and sent to various Fenton relatives; it is accompanied by one respondent's handwritten answers.

Michael Francis Blake photographs, circa 1912-1934

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1.0 Linear Foot — 3 boxes — 243 items
Michael Francis Blake was one of Charleston, South Carolina's first African American studio photographers. Collection consists of 118 photographs, mostly studio portraits taken by Michael Francis Blake from about 1912 to 1934, with some outdoor settings. There is also a full set of copy prints. The great majority of the subjects appear to be African American; however, there are also individuals who are multi-racial, and possibly white and Asian. Formats comprise 91 photographic postcards and 28 black-and-white prints, many on card mounts but some in the form of more casual snapshots; there are also eight copy negatives. A few of the photographs may be taken by others. Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including a portrait of the photographer. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of 118 photographs of men, women, and children as single individuals, family groups, and other group shots. There is also a full set of copy prints (preferred for access) and eight copy negatives. The great majority of the subjects appear to be African American; however, there are individuals who are multi-racial, and possibly white and Asian. The photographs were taken by Michael Francis Blake, an African American photographer from Charleston, South Carolina, from about 1912 to 1934, mostly in his studio at 384 West Sumter Street. There are a few that may have been taken by another indiviual. Some of the photographs are stamped with Blake's name and studio addresses.

The majority of the photographs were originally housed in a photograph album entitled "Portraits of Members," also included in the collection, but have been rehoused for preservation purposes. Ninety-one of the photos are photographic postcards and the others are either mounted photographs or snapshots. The predominant style is the formal studio portrait, standing or seated. There are also some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Some portraits were taken outdoors in front of a backdrop with props such as rugs, chairs and plants to recreate a studio setting. Others were taken on the street; the location of photograph #28 has been identified as just outside of Blake's studio. Some have what appear to be shopping lists and other notations written on the backs, and a few have names, ages, and street addresses, presumably of the sitter or their household.

Through existing captions and public input, thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including the photographer, Michael Francis Blake, who appears in one portrait.

Each original print has been assigned a unique institutional identifier. All but one have been digitized and are available online through the Duke Digital Collections website.

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Original photographs, circa 1912-1934 .25 Linear Feet — 1 box — 118 prints

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Series consists of one box of 118 original photographic prints, many of them photographic poscards with the rest mounted on cardstock. Most have been are stamped or have been otherwise identified as produced by Michael Francis Blake's photography studio in Charleston, South Carolina. Dates are approximate unless marked on the photograph. In some cases, the studio address reveals the time period. All measurements are in inches.

Copy prints are available in box 2 and are the preferred format for access to avoid overuse of the originals.

Additionally, the original prints have been digitized and are available on the Duke Libraries Digital Collections website.

Paul Kwilecki photographs and papers, circa 1910-2008, bulk 1960-2008

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42 Linear Feet — 54 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 2 oversize boxes — Approximately 9480 Items
Collection comprises over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, along with negatives, contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and printed material, totaling over 9000 items. Kwilecki's photographic work documents rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Subjects include local landscapes, tobacco workers, county fairs, hog slaughtering, cemeteries, churches, courthouses, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, shoppers, downtowns, and house porches and interiors. The themes of race relations and religious life predominate. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Significant correspondents in the manuscripts series include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection includes a small set of Vestal photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Paul Kwilecki Photographs and Papers span the whole of his career and include over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, negatives (chiefly safety but also some nitrate and glass plate), contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and other printed material, totaling over approximately 9000 items.

The bulk of the collection consists of Paul Kwilecki's prints and other photographic material documenting rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Although Kwilecki developed an interest in photography in the 1940s, only a very small portion of the images in the collection pre-date 1970.

The collection is organized into two major series: Photographic Materials, containing prints, contact sheets, and negatives, and a Manuscripts Series housing many files of correspondence, writings, and other personal papers.

While initially interested in photographing tobacco workers, Kwilecki turned his focus to other subjects, including county fairs, hog slaughtering times, cemeteries, churches, courtrooms, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, bus stations, shoppers, downtowns, house porches and interiors, and landscapes. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Throughout the collection, the themes of race relations and religious life tend to predominate.

The Manuscripts Series (1967-2008) also provides an interpretation of life in Decatur County but also documents Kwilecki's photographic philosophy and practices. The correspondence and the journals, related to Kwilecki's work and career as a photographer, comprise the largest groupings. The series also contains Kwilecki's personal journals, dating from 1967-1969; Kwilecki's printing notes; news clippings; exhibition brochures; and a brief internet biography of Kwilecki. Many of Kwilecki's writings attempt to express in words the same topics he tried to illuminate through photography.

Additional manuscripts (14 boxes) and photographic materials were received in 2010 following Kwilecki's passing away. They include many folders of correspondence dating from 1971-2008, arranged in original order either chronologically or alphabetically by folder title. Significant correspondents include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection also includes a small set of Vestal's photographic prints. Other files contain writings, clippings, and other items. The writings include journals from the 1970s; typed excerpts from early 20th century Georgia newspapers, some on racial incidents; drafts of Kwilecki's talks; and notes for the Decatur County photography publication (one folder). A few publications round out the last box in the collection.

The negatives are closed to use; contact sheets and prints offer alternate access to Kwilecki's images. Eleven nitrate large-format sheet negatives, dating from approximately the 1940s-1960s, are slated for digitization. Also included in the collection are several glass plate negatives by an unknown photographer dating perhaps from the 1910s.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Titles come from box labels indicating location of the darkroom (termed "house" and "office") where the photographer's negatives were originally stored when collected by the library. The negatives have been given basic processing and are closed to use. Contact sheets and finished prints offer an alternative access to a selection of hundreds of Kwilecki's images.

The negatives are in 35 mm as well as 126 mm strips; also included are some cut frames and sheet film. Contact sheets in the collection from earlier years (1970s to early 1980s) are almost exclusively in 35 mm format.

Eleven 8x10 inch black-and-white cellulose nitrate sheet film negatives of uncertain origin were also found among the safety negatives. These were removed for preservation purposes and are slated for digitization. They may represent Kwilecki's earliest work or may be the work of another unidentified photographer, and may date to the 1940s (slated for digitization).

Also includes two glass plate negatives of unknown provenance of a picnic or outing with men and women in a group, circa 1910s (also slated for digitization).

Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960

1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items
Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

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Sometime in the 1980s, library staff had 82 small contact prints printed from Parnell's nitrate negatives, which were then discarded. Many are duplicates of larger prints in the photographs series, but there are also images not found elsewhere in the collection. Captions and dates accompany about half of them, copied from their original sleeves. Arranged in numerical order applied by library staff.

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Eight-five photographs make up the series, all black-and-white gelatin silver prints ranging in size from about 4x5 to 8x10 inches, with the great majority in the latter size category. There are also three larger prints roughly 11x14 inches. About a third are vintage prints, with the rest being modern copy prints made from negatives or contact prints. Many thus have a corresponding duplicate in the contact prints series, and though smaller, some contacts offer lighter, clearer images. There are a number of contact prints whose images are not found in the Photographs series. There are also images present in the Negatives series without a corresponding positive print in the collection.

Because Parnell took over the Cole-Holladay studio around 1919 or 1920, there are some pre-1919 prints that originated from Holladay; prints taken after 1920 were the Parnell studio's work. Credit for the Bennett place photograph has been given by the Library of Congress to a John Chapman Michie; it is not known how the print came to be in the Parnell's collection.

Written on the backs of the vintage prints are various captions and other remarks in Parnell's hand, and sometimes reproduction and layout markings, probably for use in the local newspaper. A few are signed by Parnell, or marked with his studio stamp.

The prints are in numerical order as assigned by library staff, in rough chronological order within subseries. Descriptions of subject content are found in the subseries notes and individual entries for each photograph.

John Ridlon papers, 1846-1936 and undated

8.0 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 oversize folders; 1 pamphlet binder
Physician, surgeon, and professor specializing in orthopedic medicine, practicing in New York State and Chicago, Illinois. Collection consists of medical case files and casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographs, ephemera, diplomas, and medical illustrations dating chiefly from the 1890s-1920s, relating to Dr. John Ridlon's career and extensive research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of illustrations in the form of medical case photographs and photographic prints of early X-rays. Accompanying the papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's medical military training at a base in Plattsburgh, N.Y., and some during his service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. Duplicate and similar images are found in glass plate and nitrate film negatives. A set of 49 glass lantern slides of his time in the WWI medical camp were used to illustrate lectures about his experiences; a reprint of the lecture text is in the collection. There are also a handful of photographic portraits of Ridlon. Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P.D. Wilson, R.K. Ghormley, J.E. Goldthwait, A.B. Judson, R.W. Lovett, H.W. Orr, S.W. Mitchell, and H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

This material, which documents John Ridlon's medical career, consists of medical case files, casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographic materials, diplomas and ephemera, and medical illustrations, relating to Ridlon's research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of medical illustrations in the form of photographs mounted on board, photographic prints of early X-rays, and printed illustrations on loose sheets that show patients, symptoms or deformities, and treatments such as surgery, braces and casts; many of them were used by Ridlon in his published works.

Among the bound volumes are six casebooks (1889-1892); four letterbooks (1873-1903); an autograph manuscript, "Some comments on the principles and practice of Hugh Owen Thomas" (undated); a scrapbook of figures and illustrations (undated); three volumes composed of reprint clippings and manuscript notes (undated); and a bound volume of 88 reprints (1888-1923). There are also many diplomas and certificates received by Ridlon from various educational institutions.

Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P. D. Wilson, R. K. Ghormley, J. E. Goldthwait, A. B. Judson, R. W. Lovett, H. W. Orr, S. W. Mitchell, H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children.

Accompanying the professional papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. The photos were taken by several photographers at a medico-military training camp in Plattsburgh, N.Y., around 1916. Ridlon reported on these experiences at a medical conference in 1917 and used a set of 67 glass lantern slides to illustrate the lecture, 49 of which survive in the collection; a reprint of this paper is also available in the collection.

In the same series there is a set of 30 glass plate negatives and still image nitrate film negatives; these materials are closed to use but contain duplicate or similar images found in the print photographs. Finally, there are several portraits of Ridlon, chiefly photographs taken in his office and examination room, taken in 1911. A glass plate negative with a bust portrait of Ridlon rounds out the photographic series.

The collection also contains several folders of ephemera, early professional diplomas and certificates, letters of recommendation for Ridlon's Chicago appointment in 1892, and his obituary.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Photographic Materials, circa 1910-1932 10 boxes; 1 pamphet binder

Contains 118 black-and-white photographs of the first medico-military training camp at Plattsburgh, N.Y. Images feature camp scenes, including camp cook stations, mules and wagons, a water truck, machine gun pits, headquarters tents, officers and privates, and drills and reviews of the infantry and cavalry. Several prints show Ridlon during litter drills. Names on the backs of certain groups of prints may indicate the photographers: Dr. Suches (?) and Dr. McGraw. Other individuals are also identified, and most of the images are captioned.

Accompanying the photo prints is a set of 49 lantern slides Ridlon used for lectures bearing black-and-white photographs in excellent condition, along with the corresponding lecture text presented by John Ridlon at a conference in 1917, describing the camp and the American preparedness for war with respect to military medicine (photocopied from reprint #82 in the volume, "Collected Papers of Dr. John Ridlon", also in this collection). The paper was originally illustrated by 67 lantern slides. Also in this series are 30 glass plate negatives and eight nitrate film negatives which, like the lantern slides, contain duplicate images found in the photographic prints folders.

Series also includes three postcards from the camp at Plattsburgh, three photographic portraits of John Ridlon, two prints of him seated at a desk in his office, and two of him in his examination room, one of which is a duplicate; a wall calendar gives the date as 1911. A glass plate negative bearing a bust portrait of Ridlon rounds out the series.

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Bound holograph manuscripts containing case notes on orthopedic patients with a variety of complaints, including descriptions of each case and patient data such as name, age, sex, address, dates of consultations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Includes several one-page manuscripts laid in as well as outlines made of patient body parts showing measurements of the actual curvature and size of affected areas. There are many other patient case studies in folders housed in the Patient Case Files Series. Medical records are open for research use.

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Contains several hundred black-and-white images taking the form of photographs (mounted on cardstock), early X-rays, and printed illustrations, all relating to Ridlon's case studies and research on orthopedics. Many were used in his publications from the 1880s to the 1920s. The photographer may have been John Ridlon or an assistant. These historic medical images are open to use.

Images show unidentified patients with deformities and abnormalities, treatments (including braces, casts, and sometimes surgery), and outcomes. Many are pediatric patients. Original folder titles have been retained.

Other photographs in the collection are found in the Photographs Materials series and are related to Ridlon's medical training at a military base in Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916; also includes portraits of John Ridlon.

James Van Der Zee photographs, circa 1908-1935

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.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 42 photographic prints
Collection comprises 42 photographs taken by James Van Der Zee, known for his portraits and documentation of daily life in Harlem, N.Y., especially during the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). There are views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, as well as fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations. Subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats, a soldier, a female impersonator, a funerary portrait of a man in an open casket, Black Hebrews, Black Cross nurses, Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade, entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia, boxer Jack Johnson, and entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing a violin, circa 1930. An early portrait of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter was taken around 1908, in Lenox, Massachusetts, his birthplace. Average print size is roughly 10 3/4 x 12 inches. Almost all are exhibit prints created mostly in the 1980s from original negatives. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises forty gelatin silver exhibit prints and two vintage prints of images taken by photographer James Van Der Zee, known for his portraits and documentation of daily life in Harlem, N.Y., especially during the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). There are views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, as well as fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing the violin, circa 1930. Other subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats; a 1923 soldier; the New York Black Giants baseball team; a female impersonator; a man in an open funeral casket with a superimposed poem extolling fatherhood; a group of African American Hebrews in front of the Moorish Zionist Temple; Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade; a Garveyite with his son; entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia in their "Dark Tower" salon with a large group of friends; boxer Jack Johnson; and a double exposure portrait of entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.

Prints are arranged in chronological order. The earliest images, from 1908, are of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter, probably taken in Lenox, Massachusetts, Van Der Zee's birthplace, and a blacksmith, probably taken in Virginia, where Van der Zee spent some time before moving to New York.

The exhibit prints were created from original negatives chiefly from 1981-1983, under the supervision of James Van Der Zee until his passing in 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Mussenden Van Der Zee. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from runs of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed by the photographer.

The majority of the prints measure 10 x 12 inches (sheet dimensions); image sizes range from 10 1/8 x 8 to 10 x 2 5/8 inches.

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These prints were created from original negatives under the supervision of James Van Der Zee mostly from 1981 to 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Admussen. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from a run of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed on the verso by the photographer. With few exceptions, they are embossed in the lower right corner with the seal of the James Van Der Zee Estate.

Aaron Michael Barker papers, 1905-1979 and undated, bulk 1917-1944

1.4 Linear Feet
This collection includes two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of Jewish, Lithuanian-American merchant A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany.

This collection consists of two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Additional items not contained in the scrapbooks include family photographs, a letter, and a ketubah. The scrapbooks were named for World War I and World War II according to the approximate time of the creation of their contents and the subject matter of the newspaper clippings. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany. Most of the correspondence is between Michael Barker or Anna Harris Barker and immediate and extended family members.

Barker created the scrapbooks from financial ledgers of his businesses in New Jersey and Wilson, North Carolina, and the financial entries are largely obscured by scrapbook inserts. While he created a majority of the content of the scrapbooks, some items were added after his death, presumably by another family member.

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The World War II scrapbook and ledger includes writings by Michael Barker, newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, and other material, some of which postdates Barker’s death. Barker’s writings include short sayings, adages, verses, and scattered annotations to newspaper clippings. Barker recorded his "memories" (circa 1942-1943) on pages 99-147, in which he detailed his financial troubles and efforts to borrow money from friends and relatives. He also included commentary on the treatment of Jews in Germany, updates on family members, and the state of his health. There is also small amount of personal correspondence of both Michael Barker and Anna Harris Barker with friends and family members.

The newspaper clippings cover topics such as Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and other aspects of World War II. Also included are clippings of poetry, life, and religion columns. Other materials present in the scrapbook include black-and-white photographs of family members, Barker’s employees, and unidentified individuals; insurance statements and other documents related to the estate of Michael Barker; and Sunday school programs from Temple Oheb Sholom, Goldsboro, NC.

Financial entries contained in the ledger are obscured by scrapbook inserts. Among the visible financial records are accounts (circa 1939-1943) with Leder Brothers (Goldsboro, NC) and other businesses; transactions with family members, and payments of property rents.

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Inscription on inside cover: May, 1905, Michael Barker, Trenton, NJ

The World War I scrapbook includes newspaper clippings related to fundraising efforts for the relief of Jewish victims of the war in Europe, the service of Jewish men in the American armed forces, and the Zionist movement. Also included are receipts for personal and community donations to war relief funds, the Zionist Organization of America Palestine Restoration Fund, and Jewish social welfare agencies, as well as payment of dues for Michael Barker’s fraternal order memberships. Other items include letters from the Zion War Orphanage and the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary in acknowledgement of contributions from the Wilson, NC, Jewish community through Michael Barker; a copy of a petition sent to the President of the United States regarding the status of Palestine; promotional materials from the [American Jewish] Joint Distribution Committee; and a black and white photograph of an unidentified woman.

The visible financial records contained in the ledger date from at least 1905 through 1908, although many pages, including index pages, are obscured by scrapbook inserts. Types of information for Michael Barker’s Trenton, NJ business include merchandise transactions with area stores and accounts of profits and losses. Also included are operating expenses for Barker’s store in Wilson, NC.

Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated

1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items — Approximately 1200 items
Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 slave names from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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Acquired in the 1990s as an addition to the Bullock family papers collection, this group of images represents African American and bi-racial descendants of the Bullock family of Granville (Vance) County, NC. The earliest image is a head and shoulders portrait of a toddler-aged child, from around 1900-1910 or earlier. Individuals photographed circa 1930s and 1940s are the donor's great-grandfather and great-grandmother Thomas S. Bullock (born ca. 1869) and Eliza Hendricks Bullock (born ca. 1875); grandfather and grandmother George Bullock and Winnie Russell; and aunts Alice and Sally. Other names are Elnora "Noda" Bullock, the donor's mother, as a child. The portrait of Thomas S. Bullock as a middle-age man was taken by the Flushing Photo Studio in Flushing, N.Y. Sally Bullock's photo at age 16 gives the location of Manson, NC, near the Bullock family's original homeplace. Thomas S. Bullock and Eliza Hendricks Bullock are listed in the 1910 census as a mulatto married couple in Nutbush, Vance County, NC. In other censuses and records, they are identified as African Americans ("Negro" or "Black").

The original photographs were loaned to the library in the 1990s, and staff created these negatives and photographic copies. A set of paper photocopies of some of the prints are labeled with individual's names.

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Diaries, 1839-1871 2 Volumes

Two volumes: a travel diary by an unknown person, probably a Bullock family member, recounting a business trip in 1848 from Warrenton, North Carolina west to Knoxville, Tennessee; and a personal diary (1869-1871) kept by Susan Cobb Bullock, along with earlier entries (1839-1841) from a general store or other similar business, probably run by her husband John Bullock, whose name faintly appears on the cover of the volume.

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Includes a folder of medical receipts and treatments by local doctors, 1834-1837, chiefly for family members but also mentions enslaved people and servants. Other papers of note in the series include a list of slaves initialed by John Bullock, 1857; 19th century commodities price sheets from Virginia; and school grades and comportment reports, with a few antebellum from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the sons of John Bullock.

William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909

9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items
Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Top 3 results in this collection — view all 23
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The Hebei province in northern China borders Shanxi and Henan, where Shockley also traveled, and includes the city of Jehol, now known as Rehe or Chengde, where some of these images were taken. Subjects in this small series chiefly consist of temples, Buddhist statuary, and a few scenes of groups of men, women, and children taken in a mining district.

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This small series documents Shockley's travels in late summer and early fall to Klyuchi, a remote and cold rural town on the Kamchatka River, where he surveyed and assessed gold mining operations. There he photographed the mine manager Harper and his family, log buildings at the mining camp, and nearby forests and rivers. There are also two views of passenger boarding a steamer near Stretensk, on the Shilka River. A sequence of 12 images of a woman and several boys taken in an unidentified park setting may not be related to this trip, or may have been taken at the start or end of the journey.