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Primarily records of the American Economic Review, (Accession 2001-0118) specifically journal office files consisting of correspondence, manuscript, book review, and referee files (1969-1998). There are also records for the organization (1886-1984) and for its Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP 1972-1993), including histories, reports, minutes, statistics, as well as membership, account, conference, board member, miscellaneous, and newsletter or editorial office files. Some CSWEP material is also present as 371 machine-readable records. There is a small set of journal office records for the Journal of Economic Literature (1975, 1984-1994 and undated). In addition, there are 50 black-and-white photographs of former association presidents, a 39"x10" black-and-white group photograph taken at an unidentified meeting, 48 rolls of microfilm from the various journals (mostly AER), 63 microfiche of Journal of Economic Literature correspondence ([1968]-1980), and 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes.

Addition (2001-0082) (4000 items, 9.6 linear feet; dated 1998-1999) includes records for the American Economic Review, including correspondence and referee files for rejected and withdrawn articles (1998), accepted articles (1999), and papers and proceedings (1999).

Addition (2002-0215) (21000 items, 33.4 linear feet; dated 1999-2001) contains records for the American Economic Review, including editorial correspondence, referee reports, and manuscripts for rejected articles (1999-2000) and accepted articles (March-December 2001) and papers and proceedings (2000-2001). Also includes 37 electronic documents on one floppy disk.

The collection consists of 15 additional accessions dating from 2003 to 2008 with over 200 additional boxes. These additions have not been processed, but are available for research with permission from the American Economic Association. Please consult the Preliminary Description of Unprocessed Collection (below) for details.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Herbert Scarf (1930-2015) was an economist and mathematician, and worked as a professor of economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, and operations research.

The Herbert Scarf Papers document his career as an economist and mathematician. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the computation of economic equilibrium and fixed points, stability of general equilibrium, the core of many-person games and its relation to general equilibrium, integer programming, and problems of production with indivisibilities. Much of Scarf's work serves as the basis for applied general equilibrium models, and as a precursor to modern computational and simulation approaches to economics.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists and mathematicians such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Ralph Gomory, Terje Hansen, Werner Hildenbrand, Tjalling Koopmans, Harold Kuhn, Lloyd Shapley, John Shoven, Martin Shubik, John Whalley, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Scarf's leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and other organizations; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the economics, operations research, and applied mathematics programs at Yale University.

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Kenneth J. Arrow papers, 1921-2017 142 Linear Feet — 94 boxes — 13.2 Gigabytes

Kenneth Arrow (1921-2017) was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and a professor of economics at Stanford University and Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and other materials documenting his political and personal interests, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, public policy, and international relations.

The Kenneth Arrow Papers document his career as an economist, professor, and Nobel Laureate. The collection provides an overview of his many professional activities, along with his research, writings, and collected notes regarding topics such as microeconomics, contingent valuation, social choice theory, general equilibrium analysis, the economics of information, climate change, and endogenous-growth theories. The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists such as Robert Aumann, Gerard Debreu, Frank Hahn, John Harsanyi, Leonid Hurwicz, Harold Hotelling, Tjalling Koopmans, Alain Lewis, Lionel McKenzie, Roy Radner, Martin Shubik, Herbert Simon, Robert Solow, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Arrow's role as an expert witness during various legal cases involving anti-trust lawsuits, international trade, and public utilities; his professional consulting work for different groups and organizations; his political activism supporting different human rights organizations, including his involvement in agencies promoting peace in the Middle East, environmental regulation, arms reduction, and nuclear testing bans; his itineraries, lectures, and public engagements; administrative activities for various professional associations and conferences, including his leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Beijer Institute, the Econometric Society, the International Economic Association, the Office of Naval Research, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Science, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and many more; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the Economics Departments of Stanford University, Harvard University, and the Santa Fe Institute. The collection also contains personal artifacts and documents from Arrow's childhood and early education; awards and honorary degrees, including the Clark Medal, the National Medal of Science, and materials from the Nobel Prize ceremony; assorted books from his personal library; various foreign editions of his published works, in multiple languages; and born-digital records with his email and other working documents.

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Robert M. Solow papers, 1951-2011 and undated 63.1 Linear Feet — 45,300 Items

Nobel Prize-winning economist and economics professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Robert M. Solow Papers span the years 1951-2011 and document the full scope of his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation, articles written for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association and the Econometrics Society, and the Council of Economic Advisors to the White House. The collection is divided into the following series: Correspondence, Teaching Materials, Published Papers and Writings, Professional Service, and Audiovisual Materials.

The papers of Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert M. Solow span the years 1951-2011 and document his professional, scholarly, and academic work. The majority of the collection consists of voluminous files of correspondence (1960-2011) with students, colleagues, and other economists, and it includes his reviews of papers by other scholars, referee reports, letters of recommendation articles for the public, professional correspondence as well as policy recommendations. The papers also contain lecture notes for courses Solow taught at MIT (1972-1996); published papers by Solow on macroeconomics, growth theory, linear programming, and other topics (1950-2011); and files from economic, academic, and governmental organizations in which he served, including the American Economics Association, the National Bureau of Economic Research, and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton. The published papers series also contains notes and rough drafts on topics such as econometrics, employment (specifically the theory of unemployment) and growth policies, macroeconomics, and the theory of capital. There is also some material on the Neo-classical Growth Model, also known as the Solow-Swan Growth Model (1956).

The largest series in the collection, the Correspondence Series is subdivided into three groups: Chronological Correspondence, Alphabetical Correspondence, and Recommendations. The first two consist of correspondence from students, colleagues, and collaborators, with some responses from Solow included. The exchanges include economists such as Kenneth Arrow, Olivier Blanchard, Alan Blinder, Partha Dasgupta, Frank Hahn, Paul Samuelson, and James Tobin. The alphabetical correspondence dating from 1951-1976, is similar in content to the chronological correspondence but smaller in size; it also contains more pieces related to organizations and businesses. The Alphabetical Correspondence (Recommendations) dating from 1971-1986, is the smallest of the three and consists of requests for and the subsequent letters of recommendation from Solow for either students or professional economists.

The Teaching Materials Series houses the teaching materials generated from Solow's MIT economics courses (spanning an approximate 30 years of his 40 year MIT career) as well as the notes and materials used for lectures given at other forums and institutions. These materials consist of reading lists, syllabi, outlines, exams, problem sets and their solutions, homework, waivers, attendance rosters, assignments, spiral notebooks of economic equations, and personal preparatory notes handwritten by Solow.

Nearly all of Solow's major publications and co-publications (see bibliography for the few exceptions) are found in the Published Papers and Writings Series. These include his Ph.D. thesis, speeches, lectures, invited lectures, panel discussions, op-ed pieces, journal articles, brochures, pamphlets, reviews of his works and his responses to the reviews, Congressional testimony, and memorial tributes, as well as the rough drafts and notes for these documents.

The Professional Service Series includes varied documents associated with the groups Robert Solow was either a member of, held a position in, wrote pieces for, or supported. Files contain correspondence, meeting minutes, proposals, reports, publications, votes, elections, and financial reports. The largest organizations represented in this series are the American Economic Association and the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

Four videos featuring Solow are collected in the Audio Visual Series. Materials date from 2003 to 2009. Within the series, one item is recorded on a VHS cassette and the rest are in DVD format.