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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box; 24 print

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images, produced for two photo projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8/1/2 inches to 11 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, there are 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. These were the earliest years of Siskind's long career, and a period of experimentation in which he mingled photography with a social purpose with images emphasizing form and light rather than social content.

The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in the bedrooms and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on the work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, this collection holds 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Titles and dates originate from those accompanying original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; titles assigned by a former collector, present on the back of the prints, are also given in a separate note field in the collection guide entry for each print.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

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Activating the Archive student projects collection, 2015 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 7 computer files; 10.6 Gigabyte

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Creative projects produced by students in Activating the Archive: Archival Research as Documentary Practice, DOCST 316-01 / 716-01 / ARTVIS 316-01 / VMS 314S-01, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Rubenstein Library in the Fall of 2015. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Art (Duke University).

Materials have been arranged by student name.

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Adam Reynolds is a conceptual documentary photographer whose work explores contemporary political conflict, primarily in the Middle East. His series "Architecture of an Existential Threat" was the 2016 winner of the ADA Collection Award for an Emerging Documentarian. Taken in Israel between 2013 and 2015, the photographs document bomb shelters and sealable rooms to which residents of the State of Israel are required to have access. There are over 10,000 of these public and private bomb shelters in Israel and the Occupied Territories. The photographs show the way these spaces are normalized in Israeli life, using them as community centers, places of worship, or bars. Reynolds writes that "these shelters are the architecture of an existential threat--both real and perceived."

Adam Reynolds's series "Architecture of an Existential Threat" was the 2016 winner of the ADA Collection Award for an Emerging Documentarian. He included the following abstract of his work:

"Since its creation in 1948, the State of Israel has felt itself isolated and beset by enemies seeking its destruction. This collective siege mentality is best expressed in the ubiquity of the thousands of bomb shelters found throughout the country. By law all Israelis are required to have access to a bomb shelter and rooms that can be sealed off in case of an unconventional weapons attack. There are over 10,000 public and private bomb shelters found throughout Israel and the Occupied Territories.

The photographs in this series document these bomb shelters and offer a window into the collective mindset of the Israeli people. Israelis have normalized this “doomsday space” into their daily lives, often using the shelters as dance studios, community centers, pubs, and places of worship. For Jewish Israelis haunted by a history of exile and persecution, these shelters are the architecture of an existential threat – both real and perceived."

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Afghan Wars photographs, circa 1897 1.5 Linear Feet — 45 Items

Collection of black and white glossy photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Anglo-Afghan War most likely during the Mamund Valley hostilities of 1897. Prints are mounted on cardstock, and collection includes the portfolio in which they were originally housed. Most have captions with location or subject, either typed or hand-written; a few are dated 1897. Images feature British Army military camps, landscapes, and groups of officers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection of glossy black and white photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Afghan Wars, most likely in summer and fall 1897 during which there was a major outbreak of hostilities. The images consist of 24 8.125" x 5.75" prints, and 21 smaller 4.125" x 5.75" prints, all affixed to cardstock, three or four per page, often on both sides of the board. There is also a panoramic shot of the Tungai Pass made up of three sequenced prints. Pasted-down typed captions are also present for some images, while others carry handwritten captions; a few are dated 1897. The set was originally housed in an unmarked cloth and board portfolio, which has also been conserved. Resembling to some degree in subject matter the Afghanistan images of military photographer R. B. Holmes, the majority of the images in this collection depict British military camps and landscapes. The landscape views include the Mamund Valley, Tangi Pass, Agrah, Chakdara, Malakand, and Ambeyla Pass, and a few captions describe events taking place in that location. Military camps, many taken at a distance with fine detail, include Buner, Inayat Killa, Kindergali, and Malakand. A few scenes show bridges, including a boat bridge over the Indus. Some prints feature groups of officers in posed and casual scenarios, including one image of the First Royal West Kent Regiment. One image shows the gravesite of 2nd Lieutenant W. C. Browne-Clayton, dated Sept. 30, 1897, killed at the battle of Agrah. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Akea Brionne Brown photographs, 2016-2018 2.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 33 prints

These thirty-three color inkjet portraits are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown, and explore the life of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

These thirty-three color inkjet photographs are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown and explore the lives of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards and streets. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. Two are sized slightly smaller at 15 3/4 x 20 3/4 and 15 x 20 1/4 inches.

The prints are accompanied by the artist's statement, in which she writes: "The project manifested through my own personal critique and observation of the suburban landscape as an ideologically 'white space.' I began to consider the importance of representation and exposure in relation to the formation of black identity, the performativity of blackness, and the ways in which the home transforms into a place of familiarity and/or unfamiliarity depending on who enters the space. In turn, this body of work aims to highlight an often overlooked group in contemporary American culture: the black, suburban middle class."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Alen MacWeeney photographs, 1962-1986, bulk 1965 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 14 prints — The prints all measure approximately 13x18 inches; image sizes vary and are given in the inventory. All sizes given are rounded up to the nearest 1/8 of an inch.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals and families, as well as some of animals, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes. The prints measure 13x18 inches. A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images along with others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals, including an old man in a field, a Benedictine monk, a woman in a doorway, and a farming family, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes.

The black-and-white inkjet prints are printed on uncoated textured art paper, and measure 13x18 inches. Image sizes range from 6 1/8 x 10 1/4 to 11 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches.

A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images and others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 and undated 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

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Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. They are organized into the following series: The Last and First Eskimos; Southern Color; North Carolina; The Idea of Cuba; Game Boy; May Day, 1970: Yale on Strike; Red White Blue and God Bless You: A Portrait of Northern New Mexico; New Mexico in Black and White; River of Traps (New Mexico); Rainbow Gathering; Philadelphia Experience Corps; Old And On Their Own; Mobile, Alabama; and Dream of a House. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia; students on strike at Yale University; counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona; a boy tethered to electronic technology; elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina; and views of the art-filled interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document his many collaborations with other photographers and writers, including noted photojournalist Gertrude Duby Blom and naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his long career at Duke University, as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake magazine. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's letters but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Amanda Berg photographs, 2014-2015 1.0 Linear Foot — 7 items; 17 x 34.5 inches

Collection comprises seven panoramic color photographs measuring 17 x 34.5 inches, whose central panels portray older women who worked in manufacturing and are now retired or laid off; images set along each side of the portraits feature the sites where they once worked. The images were taken by documentary journalist Amanda Berg in five North Carolina locations - Banner Elk, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Massey Hill, and Newland - in 2014 and 2015. They form part of the multi-artist project "Where we live: a North Carolina portrait." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises seven panoramic color photographs measuring 17 x 34.5 inches, whose central panels portray older women who worked in manufacturing and are now retired or laid off; images set along each side of the portraits feature the sites where they once worked. The images were taken by documentary journalist Amanda Berg in five North Carolina locations - Banner Elk, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Massey Hill, and Newland - in 2014 and 2015. They form part of the multi-artist project "Where we live: a North Carolina portrait," funded by the Annenberg Foundation and directed by photographer Alex Harris.

The photographer writes: "As I reflect on the history of documentary photography, my photographs in this exhibition call attention to the evolution of the camera and possibilities of digital art. The resulting panoramas invite the viewer to project their own story into the frame, while considering the relationship between industry, identity, gender, and social mobility in North Carolina."

The collection was acquired as part of the Archives of Documentary Art at Duke University.