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Edwin Clarke Gregory papers, 1877-1948 and undated 2.8 Linear Feet — 3,699 Items

Lawyer and North Carolina legislator, from Salisbury (Rowan Co.), North Carolina. Papers, primarily legal, business, and political correspondence, of Gregory and of his father-in-law, Lee Slater Overman, lawyer and U.S. Senator from North Carolina. Gregory's papers give much information on his career in the North Carolina Senate and relate to such topics as agriculture, gold mining, public aid, and public libraries. A majority of the papers before 1930 pertain to Overman's service in the U.S. Senate (1903-1930) and refer to such events as the North Carolina senatorial contest of 1902, the Espionage Acts of 1914 and 1915, and Alfred E. Smith's 1928 presidential campaign in North Carolina. Includes letters of Margaret Overman Gregory relating to her activities in charitable foundations and the American Red Cross about the time of World War I. Correspondents include Josiah W. Bailey, Josephus Daniels, Frank P. Graham, and Sam Rayburn.

Papers, primarily legal, business, and political correspondence, of Gregory and of his father-in-law, Lee Slater Overman, lawyer and U.S. Senator from North Carolina. Gregory's papers give much information on his career in the North Carolina Senate and relate to such topics as agriculture, gold mining, public aid, and public libraries. A majority of the papers before 1930 pertain to Overman's service in the U.S. Senate (1903-1930) and refer to such events as the North Carolina senatorial contest of 1902, the Espionage Acts of 1914 and 1915, and Alfred E. Smith's 1928 presidential campaign in North Carolina. Includes letters of Margaret Overman Gregory relating to her activities in charitable foundations and the American Red Cross about the time of World War I. Correspondents include Josiah W. Bailey, Josephus Daniels, Frank P. Graham, and Sam Rayburn.

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James H. Pou Bailey papers, 1901-1970 14.6 Linear Feet — 8,640 items

The James H. Pou Bailey Papers span the years 1901 to 1970 with the bulk of the papers dating from 1948 to 1965. The Law Practices: Clients Series (CLOSED), which contains papers relating to specific clients in his law practice, comprises the bulk of the collection. The papers also document Bailey's political interests and pursuit of political office, financial and legal matters pertaining to himself and family members, and his involvement in civic organizations. These concerns are documented by the Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal and Financial Papers, and Writings and Speeches Series. While the collection contains a few speeches to various organizations and civic groups, there are not as many as one might expect from a person who ran for the North Carolina State Senate three times and held the office for two terms (four years). Also, there are not many papers relating to his tenure as Judge of Superior Court from the 10th Judicial District.

The business and financial climate in North Carolina during the late 1940s to the early 1960s may be studied through the Law Practices: Clients (CLOSED) and Subject Files Series. Early efforts to promote cable television in North Carolina (1963-1964) through the Engineering Sales Corporation of Raleigh, N.C. and to encourage the use of natural gas in North Carolina (1955-1959) through the efforts of consulting engineers, Porter, Barry, & Associates of Baton Rouge, La. are delineated in this series. Both firms were legal clients of Bailey.

Of particular note are several political figures represented in the Correspondence Series, including North Carolina Senator Willis Smith and Virginia Senator Harry F. Byrd. The business, professional, and personal relationship of Bailey with United States Senator from North Carolina, Jesse Helms, is reflected in the Correspondence and Law Practices: Clients Series (CLOSED). The papers particularly concern Helms's position as administrative assistant to Senator Willis Smith and the offices Helms held in the North Carolina Bankers Association (NCBA), a Bailey client. Information about policies and laws affecting banks in North Carolina are also represented in the Law Practices: Clients Series (CLOSED). The Subject Files Series contains Bailey's Senatorial Papers (1950-1954). Included is constituent mail, information pertaining to political appointments, and his service on various committees, including his chairmanship of the Interstate and Federal Relations and Judiciary Committees.

The Subject Files and Legal and Financial Papers Series disclose some of the financial interests held by Bailey and his family. Most notable are their interest in the Andrew Johnson Hotel in Raleigh, N.C. and Bailey's interest in a 360 acre farm in Johnston County, N.C. Included is information relating to the management of both enterprises. The collection also highlights father-son relationships in the correspondence between Josiah W. Bailey and James H. Pou Bailey and between James H. Pou Bailey and his son, Jim. (Correspondence Series).

The Josiah W. Bailey (Bailey's father) Papers is a related collection in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

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U.S. Army colonel from North Carolina. Bound volumes, correspondence, scrapbooks, and clippings detailing Langston's activities as a Trinity College (later became Duke University) student, then later as a U.S. Army colonel in World War II, and assistant to General Lewis B. Hershey on the Selective Service Board. Langston also served on General E. H. Crowder's draft board in Washington, D.C. during World War I: Crowder was chiefly responsible for drafting of the Selective Service Act which was passed in May 1917, and as Provost Marshal General had responsibility for administering the program during the war. The bulk of the material covers the period 1941-1946. Other items provide evidence for Langston's support of Prohibition, and his role as opponent of Al Smith in the N.C. Democratic primary in 1928. Later additions to the collection document earlier Langston family history. They also contain Langston's poems, and correspondence with Professor Edwin Mims about them, a scrapbook of the Simmons-Bailey campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1930, and his correspondence with New York attorney Roscoe S. Conkling concerning Langston's opposition to compulsory military service during peacetime.

Bound volumes, correspondence, scrapbooks, and clippings detailing Langston's activities as a Trinity College (later became Duke University) student, then later as a U.S. Army colonel in World War II, and assistant to General Lewis B. Hershey on the Selective Service Board. Langston also served on General E. H. Crowder's draft board in Washington, D.C. during World War I: Crowder was chiefly responsible for drafting of the Selective Service Act which was passed in May 1917, and as Provost Marshal General had responsibility for administering the program during the war. The bulk of the material covers the period 1941-1946. Other items provide evidence for Langston's support of Prohibition, and his role as opponent of Al Smith in the N.C. Democratic primary in 1928. Later additions to the collection document earlier Langston family history. They also contain Langston's poems, and correspondence with Professor Edwin Mims about them, a scrapbook of the Simmons-Bailey campaign for the U.S. Senate in 1930, and his correspondence with New York attorney Roscoe S. Conkling concerning Langston's opposition to compulsory military service during peacetime.

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John Sanford Martin papers, 1915-1958 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approx. 8,602 Items

Newspaper editor from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Collection consists primarily of correspondence to and from John Sanford Martin, a newspaper editor from Winston-Salem, N.C. Letters from the 1930s to the 1940s provide information on economic and social problems in North Carolina from a number of committees on which Martin served. After 1940 there is much material on racial problems in Winston-Salem, and throughout North Carolina and the South. The correspondence from this period also reflects Martin's concern for the improvement of public education in North Carolina and his service on the North Carolina State Board of Education. Other papers relate to state and national politics, the New Deal, the Democratic Party, and the Baptist church. There are also some photographs in the collection. Significant correspondents include Josiah William Bailey, Joseph Melville Broughton, Josephus Daniels, Robert Lee Doughton, Drew Pearson, Strom Thurmond, and William Allen White.

The papers of John Sanford Martin, North Carolina newspaper editor and political figure, contain correspondence, 1912-1951, relating, for the most part, to Martin's long career as editor of the Journal and Sentinel, newspapers of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Letters pertaining to national and state politics form an important part of this correspondence and concern the presidential election of 1928 and the split in the Democratic Party in North Carolina over the candidacy of Alfred E. Smith of New York; opposition to the state sales tax in North Carolina in the 1930s; Martin's leadership in s the liberal wing of the Democratic Party in North Carolina and his attempts to bring the state party in line with the New Deal; state and national contests in the elections of 1936; an attempt by Martin and liberal Democrats to keep conservative Democrats from obtaining a federal license for a radio station in Winston-Salem; and pressures put on North Carolina Democrats to join the Dixiecrats in 1948.

Martin's professional papers, 1936-1937, deal with the purchase of the Piedmont Publishing Company, owner of the Journal and the Sentinel by the Gordon Gray family of Winston-Salem, leaders of North Carolina's conservative Democrats; the decision to retain Martin as editor of the papers; and the establishment of a working relationship between Martin and Gordon Gray.

Correspondence from the period of World War II concerns the debate over the entry of the United States into the war, politics in North Carolina during the war, activities at home, and discussions about American policy after the war, including a confidential transcript of an interview with President Harry S. Truman in 1945 on future relations with the Soviet Union and the United Nations.

Letters from the 1930s to the 1940s provide information on economic and social problems in North Carolina from a number of committees on which Martin served. After 1940 there is much material on racial problems in Winston-Salem, and throughout North Carolina and the South. The correspondence from this period also reflects Martin's concern for the improvement of public primary and secondary education in North Carolina and his service on the North Carolina State Board of Education. The collection also includes the minutes of the board of education, 1943-1953, and memoranda on school finance, legislation, integration, curricula, teacher certification and salary, textbooks, school lunches, and student loans.

Material reflecting Martin's interest in the Baptist Church includes correspondence concerning various fund raising drives within the church, Wake Forest College and its relocation in WinstonSalem, Campbell College, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and the purchase of the Biblical Recorder by the North Carolina State Baptist Convention, 1938-1939.

Printed material in the collection pertains to temperance, the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Wake Forest University, Baptists in North Carolina, politics in North Carolina and the United States, and societies of professional journalists. There are a large number of Martin's speeches and editorials covering all aspects of his career.

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Josiah William Bailey papers, 1833-1967, bulk 1900-1946 270 Linear Feet — 539 boxes — Approximately 422,400 itemss

The collection houses the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. Chiefly consists of correspondence and print material, as well as smaller amounts of financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items dating from 1900 through 1946. The collection documents Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the U.S. Senate in 1931 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. After 1931, material chiefly pertains to national affairs. Significant topics include: state and national elections and campaigns in the 1920s and 1930s; national defense and the military; veterans; the effects of the Depression on southern states and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; Prohibition; the court system; taxation; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parks; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration. Legal papers offer a sample of case files from Bailey's law office, including a 1920s case involving W.V. Guerard of the Klu Klux Klan. Outgoing personal correspondence contains many references to national and regional issues as well as personal exchanges.

Collection comprises the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), noted Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. The material covers many aspects of Bailey's life and career and provides rich information on North Carolina and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, particularly for the Depression years and World War II.

The papers are comprised chiefly of correspondence and supporting printed material, although there are also financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia, dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items falling in the period from 1900 through 1946.

The collection documents Josiah W. Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life and indicates the wide range of his intellectual interests throughout his adult years. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the United States Senate in 1930 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. During the senatorial years, material pertaining to national affairs predominates. Topics chiefly relate to national defense, the effects of the Depression on Southern States and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; prohibition; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parklands; the state and Supreme Court systems; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration.

The chronological division between the Pre-Senatorial Series and the Senatorial Series was established at December 31, 1930. There is occasional overlap among topical files within a series (such as that among Agriculture, Taxation, and Taxation: Revaluation in the Pre-Senatorial Series) or between series in some cases. When possible, cross references and other notes have been provided in the inventory. The researcher, however, should be aware of these relationships as they apply to specific research topics.

Much of Bailey's outgoing correspondence consists of form letters and perfunctory acknowledgments, but there are also many lengthy and articulate letters. It should be noted that the correspondence in the Personal Series is comprised mainly of family letters, many of which are informative about political issues of the day. Letters from Bailey to his wife, Edith Pou Bailey, and to his father-in-law, James Hinton Pou, are particularly informative.

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Wesley Norwood Jones papers, 1912-1945 1 Linear Foot — 74 items

This collection contains two letters (1918-1919) from Wesley Norwood Jones to his son, Lt. William Bailey Jones, of the Field Artillery of the American Expeditionary Forces in France. There are also letters to and from S. B. Jones, a medical officer in the British West Indies. These letters are accompanied by ten photographs of victims of a recent smallpox epidemic. There are three letters (1938) from Dr. W. S. Parsons of Shanghai. He mentions the Sino-Japanese conflict and some of his personal experiences. Several letters are from William Bailey Jones, Jr., written while he was a soldier in WWII.

This collection also includes two volumes, the first of which is a scrapbook kept by the Jones family. The scrapbook contains clippings on the political activities and death of Thomas Jones Pence of Raleigh, who in 1912 was put in charge of publicity for the Democratic National Committee. There are also clippings on the deaths of Wesley N. Jones, his son William Bailey Jones, and Mrs. William N. Jones. William Bailey Jones was in training at Camp Jackson before he went overseas. The scrapbook contains a number of photographs of doughboys training there, of their movement around France, and of their being reviewed by Pershing and Roosevelt in Dec. 1918. Additionally, there are clippings about the senatorial campaign in 1930, in which Josiah W. Bailey, brother-in-law and partner of Wesley N. Jones, defeated Senator Simmons. At the end of the scrapbook is a pamphlet entitled How the War Came (June 15, 1917). The second volume is an unbound handbook of 1941 or 1942 for Bible teachers in the public schools of N.C.