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Collection contains subject files, clippings, and reunion materials collected by Constance Curry, a civil rights activist and member of SNCC's executive board. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of Curry's early SNCC documents, including records of outsider support, as well as clippings and ephemera from the Mississippi Freedom Project and other SNCC initiatives. Also contains Curry's subject files on figures like Ella Baker and Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), and clippings from various SNCC reunions and anniversaries in the 1990s and 2000s. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African American History and Culture.

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The Duke University Oral History Program Collection contains 238 oral history interviews conducted by project participants in the years 1973-1978 and 1992. The majority of the oral history interviews deal with the civil rights movement in North Carolina, especially Durham, Chapel Hill, and Greensboro. Additionally, thirteen interviews deal with the Tulsa Race Riots, and fourteen interviews cover miscellaneous North Carolina topics. The collection also includes transcripts and research files related to the civil rights movement in North Carolina.

The collection is arranged in three series: Audiotapes, Transcripts, and Research Files. The Audiotapes Series consists of two identical sets of audiocassettes, one closed for preservation purposes and one open for researchers. The North Carolina Civil Rights Movement tapes, which make up the bulk of the series, include extensive interviews with Ella Baker, as well as hundreds of interviews with lesser-known but nonetheless important figures from the local movements in Greensboro, Durham, Chapel Hill, Weldon, and Monroe, N.C. The Tulsa Race Riots tapes include interviews conducted by Scott Ellsworth for his study Death in the Promised Land: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921. The North Carolina Miscellaneous tapes include an interview with Alex Haley about his critically-acclaimed book, Roots, as well as conversations about such topics as the state's agricultural history and mountain culture in Western North Carolina. The Transcripts Series includes eighty transcripts, as well as some interview notes, corresponding to tapes dealing with the North Carolina civil rights movement. The Research Files Series contains six files of background material related to the civil rights movement in North Carolina, including articles and speeches by Governor Terry Sanford and a bibliography of material dealing with the Durham sit-ins, and one file listing tapes and transcripts in the collection.

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Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ("Miss Baker") and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC.

Sixteen digital videocassette tapes documenting the 13 April 2000 conference, "We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Ella J. Baker ('Miss Baker') and the Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," held at Shaw University, in Raleigh, NC. The conference celebrated the organization's 40th anniversary. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced "snick") was one of the primary institutions of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. It emerged in April of 1960 from student meetings led by Baker and held at Shaw. Some of the original student members were organizers of sit-ins at segregated lunch counters in the southern United States. Its purpose then was to coordinate the use of nonviolent direct action to attack segregation and other forms of racism.

SNCC played a leading role in the Freedom Rides, the 1963 March on Washington, Mississippi Freedom Summer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party over the next few years. In the later part of the 1960s, SNCC focused on Black Power, and then fighting against the Vietnam War. In 1969, SNCC officially changed its name to the Student National Coordinating Committee to reflect the broadening of its strategies.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.