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Bassett Affair collection, 1903 - 2003 2 Linear Feet — 300 Items

The Bassett Affair is a celebrated case that helped establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States and is a benchmark incident in race relations in the South. John Spencer Bassett, a Trinity College professor, published a series of articles in the South Atlantic Quarterly (1903) that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. A campaign to remove Bassett from the faculty was thwarted by a vote of support for Bassett from the University's Board of Trustees on Dec. 2, 1903. The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of My Recollections of the Bassett Trial, by Robert Lee Durham (1936), The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts, by Baird Straughan (1975), and Crisis at Trinity a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff. English.

The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, "Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy" (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of "My Recollections of the Bassett Trial," by Robert Lee Durham (1936), "The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts," by Baird Straughan (1975), and "Crisis at Trinity" a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff.

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G. Hope Summerell Chamberlain was an author, artist, and civic worker, of Raleigh (Wake Co.) and Chapel Hill (Orange Co.), N.C. Letters from 1821 to 1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

Letters from 1821-1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

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John C. Kilgo served as President of Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) from 1894 to 1910. The John C. Kilgo Records and Papers contain correspondence, sermons, lectures, articles, newspaper clippings, memorabilia, printed matter, and scrapbooks pertaining to Kilgo's career as an educator, as President of Trinity College, and as a Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Subjects include Kilgo's educational philosophy, family affairs, Duke family philanthropy and the financial state of Trinity College, union of Methodist churches, Kilgo's election as bishop, and controversies in which he and the College were involved, including the Gattis vs. Kilgo controversy and the John Spencer Bassett Affair concerning academic freedom. English.

The John C. Kilgo Records and Papers contain correspondence, sermons, lectures, and articles, both manuscript and printed, along with newspaper clippings, memorabilia, and scrapbooks pertaining to Kilgo's career as an educator, as President of Trinity College, Durham, N.C., and as a Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Subjects include Kilgo's educational philosophy, family affairs, Duke family philanthropy and the financial state of Trinity College, union of Methodist churches, Kilgo's election as bishop, and controversies in which he and the College were involved, including the Gattis vs. Kilgo controversy and the John Spencer Bassett Affair concerning academic freedom.

The records and papers are organized into ten series. The first series, Correspondence, contains Kilgo's correspondence regarding Trinity College, Wofford College, the Methodist Church, the Bassett Affair, and the Duke family. The Sermons and notes series features handwritten and typed sermon manuscripts and other notes, mostly undated. The third series, Lectures, addresses, and writings, includes manuscripts and published material relating to Trinity College, eulogies, citizenship, the South, education, the Methodist Church, and religion. The Methodist Episcopal Church, South series contains Board of Missions Financial Statements, resolutions, addresses, and related materials. Personal and biographical materials include clippings, biographies, genealogical information, printed matter, and financial documents. This series also features modern materials, such as family correspondence of Kilgo's descendants, that were added to the collection.

The Trinity College records series features building specifications, Kilgo's inaugural address, printed matter, and materials relating to the Clark vs. Kilgo case (1898). The next series, Gattis vs. Kilgo, Duke, and Odell contains documents relating to the 1905 slander suit brought by Thomas J. Gattis against Kilgo, Benjamin N. Duke, and W. R. Odell. The seven Scrapbooks contain clippings of Kilgo's articles and sermons, pages cut from the Bible and hymnals, book reviews, and other items. The Additional materials include a catalog of Kilgo's library, a card inventory of his records and papers, and reference notes detailing press attacks on Kilgo, Trinity College, and the Duke family from 1891 to 1906. The Oversize materials series contains documents from the preceding series in the collection stored in oversize containers.

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John Spencer Bassett, a professor in the History Department of Trinity College from 1893-1906, was a renowned educator and advocate of freedom of expression. A native of North Carolina, Bassett received his A.B. from Trinity College in 1888 and his doctorate at Johns Hopkins University in 1894. He returned to Trinity College to teach and was active in teaching, writing and collecting southern Americana. Bassett began publication of an annual series of Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society; founded the honorary society 9019, a precursor to Phi Beta Kappa; founded and edited the scholarly journal, the South Atlantic Quarterly; and encouraged his students to publish and fostered their interests in Southern history. In 1903, Bassett published an article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy in the South Atlantic Quarterly, that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. Bassett's views brought on a controversy that became known as the Bassett Affair that helped to establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States. The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. English.

The collection contains personal and professional papers related to the life and work of John Spencer Bassett. Materials range in date from 1802 to 1998 (bulk 1893-1911) and include biographical information, correspondence, printed material, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, and souvenirs. The correspondence (1893-1917) includes a copy of a 1911 letter to Charles Frances Adams in which Bassett gives his account of the Bassett Affair. Other correspondents include Oswald G. Villard, William Kenneth Boyd, Edwin Mims, and William E. Dodd. Much of the original correspondence concerns affairs of the Roanoke Colony Memorial Association. Clippings ([1802]-1896) include articles about North Carolina politics, Civil War history, the Bassett Affair, Trinity College matters, race relations, the media, and education. The manuscripts include the autobiography of Jessie Lewellin Bassett, wife of John Spencer Bassett, in which she describes her life from 1866 until her marriage to Bassett in 1892; a copy of the paper, "How to Collect and Preserve Historical Material," that Bassett presented to the State Historical Association on Oct. 23, 1900; and John L. Woodward's Ph.B. thesis, "Causes and Progress of the Revolutionary Movement in North Carolina," (1894).

The bulk of John Spencer Bassett's personal papers can be found in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress.

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Society of the 9019 records, 1892-1943 5.5 Linear Feet — 2500 Items

The Society of 9019, organized in February 1890 under the leadership of John Spencer Bassett, was an honorary scholarship fraternity. The society began at Trinity College and continued on at Duke University. Acceptance into the 9019 was based, in part, on an academic average of 90 or above. It was also conditioned upon a scholastic average of 2.25 quality points, making it similar to the male only Phi Beta Kappa society. The 9019 is credited with establishing the South Atlantic Quarterly, supporting scholarly activities among North Carolina high schools, and establishing student-faculty forums on a variety of timely subjects. The group disbanded in the early 1940s. The 9019 records contain ritual and member lists, program and contest advertisements, ceremonial robes, founding documents, letters, photographs, memorabilia and other papers related to this honor society. The dates of the materials range from 1892-1944.

The 9019 records contain ritual and member lists, program and contest advertisements, ceremonial robes, founding documents, letters, photographs, memorabilia and other papers related to this honor society. Major subjects include: intellectual life; student societies; initiations and rites and ceremonies; oratory competitions, and the South Atlantic Quarterly. The dates of the materials range from 1892-1944.

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In 1892, Dr. Stephen B. Weeks, a professor of history at Trinity College, organized the Trinity College Historical Society. The goals of the Society were to collect, arrange, and preserve written materials and artifacts illustrative of the history of North Carolina and the South, and to promote the study of Southern history through lectures and publications. The Society benefited from the strong leadership of two history professors, John Spencer Bassett and William Kenneth Boyd. They made wide appeals for donations of historical materials and maintained a museum to house these relics. The meetings of the Society, held several times each year, provided a forum at which students and faculty could read their research papers and discuss their ideas. The best of these papers were published, from 1897 to 1956, in the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society. The collection includes historical notes about Trinity College and the Society, correspondence, meeting announcements, administrative files, publications, speeches, and artifacts. Materials range in date from [1492?] to 1981. English.

The collection includes a wide variety of material concerning the Trinity College Historical Society and ranges in date from [1492?] to 1981. The material includes historical notes, about Trinity College and the Trinity College Historical Society and includes transcribed notes, rosters, lists of donations, records, reviews of activities, stationary, and clippings. The correspondence and meeting announcements, [1926]-1981, includes general correspondence about the business of the Trinity College Historical Society and announcements and publicity for upcoming meetings. The administrative files, 1892-1978, includes minutes of the meetings held by the Trinity College Historical Society, and files kept by the presidents, secretaries, and treasurers of the Society. Publications, 1897-1979, include copies of the Historical Papers of the Trinity College Historical Society and newsletters published from 1978-1979. Speeches, 1904-[1980], include notes, original manuscripts, and copies of speeches and papers presented at the meetings of the Trinity College Historical Society. The artifacts, [1492?]-1918, include items collected from all aspects of American life. These relics range from coins and medals, to wooden shoe soles, to a piece of what was thought to be Christopher Columbus's flag.

In January 2007, Box 20 and folders 170 and 173 were transferred to the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, North Carolina.

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William Garrott Brown papers, 1898-1917 2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,013 items (inc. 2 vols.)

This collection contains personal and professional correspondence and literary notes of historian and essayist William Garrott Brown. The letters center around Brown's literary work and friends, but also discuss Republican politics in the South, political reaction to the imperialistic policies of Theodore Roosevelt and support of Woodrow Wilson, and the passage of the Aldrich monetary bill, which formed the basis of Federal Reserve System. It also includes letters from Brown to John Spencer Bassett giving biographical information. Other correspondents include many promiment literary and political figures. Additional papers include copies of Brown's letters in the Charles William Eliot Papers, Harvard University, and the Edward Mandell House Papers, Yale University. These concern race relations and Woodrow Wilson's 1912 presidential campaign.

This collection consists of mostly letters that center around William Garrott Brown's literary work and friends; the efforts of so-called Southern liberals to make the Republican party respectable in the South; the attempts of liberals of the nation to halt the imperialistic policies of Theodore Roosevelt by supporting Woodrow Wilson; and maneuvering behind the passing of the Aldrich monetary bill, which formed the basis of the Federal Reserve System. Also included are letters to John Spencer Bassett giving biographical information on Brown, Brown's diploma from Harvard, a copy of his will and letters from editors of Harper's Weekly and the Youth's Companion.

Additional papers include copies of Brown's letters collected by Bruce Clayton while writing his dissertation. They are in part reproduced from the Charles William Eliot Papers, Harvard University Library, and relate to Brown's career, the Harvard Guide to American History, Southern feelings toward Harvard and Massachusetts, and race relations. Other Brown letters reproduced by Clayton from the Edward Mandell House Papers, Yale University Library, concern Woodrow Wilson's presidential campaign, 1912.

Among the correspondents are: Charles Francis Adams, Edwin A. Alderman, Frederic Bancroft, J. S. Bassett, Gamaliel Bradford, William Garrott Brown (including some copies), W. L. Courtney (of the English Fortnightly Review), William A. Dunning, William Preston Few, W. W. Finley, Walter L. Fleming, Richard W. Gilder, Carter Glass, Edmund W. Gosse, Gilliam Grissom, Norman Hapgood, T. P. Harrison, Harper and Brothers, A. B. Hart, Hamilton Holt, A. E. Holton, E. M. House, D. F. Houston, J. F. Jameson, J. N. Lamed, Henry Cabot Lodge, Hamilton W. Mabie, S. W. McCall, A. C. McLaughlin, Shailer Mathews, John M. Morehead, John T. Morgan, David A. Munro, S. N. D. North, Charles E. Norton, Walter Hines Page, Bliss Perry, Herbert Putnam, James Ford Rhodes, Theodore Roosevelt, D. C. Roper, H. E. Scudder, Ellery Sedgwick, Thomas Settle, James T. Shotwell, H. L. Stimson, Moorfield Storey, F. W. Taussig, William R. Thayer, Frank B. Tracy, Oscar W. Underwood, Booker T. Washington, and Woodrow Wilson (copies).

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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.