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Box 2, Folder 3
Online

Rush thanks Dr. Bostock for his essay on respiration, saying he will read it with interest and awaits Bostock's future work on the topic. The rest of the letter relates to Rush's English ancestry and friendship with Bostock's father.

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Box 2, Folder 3
Online

Rush thanks Bostock for his article "Analysis of Animal Fluides," then provides requested anecdotes regarding Bostock's father. Rush comments upon treatment for pulmonary consumption and the use of bloodletting in parturition and pregnancy.

Collection
Online
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

Collection
English physician and chemist. Letters from Bostock to Marcet, two letters from Marcet to Bostock, and a typed transcription of a few paragraphs from letters from 1816. The letters touch upon matters personal (e.g. Bostock's move from Liverpool to London) and professional. Includes references to many contemporary European physicians and scientists. Documents the typical research and administrative opportunities available to a British medical practitioner of the early nineteenth century. Forms part of the Trent Manuscripts and was acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection dates from 1802 to 1822 and chiefly comprises letters from Bostock to Marcet, along with two letters from Marcet to Bostock, and a transcription of a few paragraphs from letters from 1816. The letters touch upon matters personal (e.g. Bostock's move from Liverpool to London) and professional. Includes references to many contemporary European physicians and scientists. The collection documents the typical research and administrative opportunities available to a British medical practitioner of the early nineteenth century. Forms part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and was acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.