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John Jackson McSwain papers, 1910-1941 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 6600 Items

Lawyer, Army officer, and U.S. Representative from Greenville, South Carolina. Collection largely consists of letters from McSwain's constituents (1921-1936). Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); Prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain. Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes many speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring.

Collection largely consists of letters from John Jackson McSwain's constituents, dating from 1921 to 1936. Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain.

The correspondence starts with a few letters from 1910, when McSwain began to take tentative steps towards politics. There are letters relating to Dr. James Woodrow, Sept.2, 1910; and to Woodrow Wilson's campaigns for Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and for the presidency in 1912. There are patronage letters in 1912 and 1913, and a cloth portrait of Woodrow Wilson woven at Clemson College, South Carolina, in 1915.

Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring. The latest dates refer to condolences sent following McSwain's death of a heart attack in 1936, and his secretary Dixon Davis's political maneuverings with Joseph Raleigh Bryson following this event.

The digitized cardfiles provide a very detailed discussion of the collection's contents and topics. For access, please consult with a reference archivist.

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John Zeigler papers, 1927-2013 (bulk 1942-1946) 2.2 Linear Feet — 1010 Items

Poet and book store owner in Charleston, SC. Collection predominantly contains World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, along with Zeigler's correspondence with his family. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients of Zeigler's correspondence and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include some documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writing and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.

The John Ziegler correspondence spans the dates 1927-2013, with the bulk of the material consisting of World War II-era correspondence between lovers/partners John Zeigler and Edwin Peacock and their close friend George Scheirer, although there is also extensive correspondence between Zeigler and his family present. After the war, Zeigler and Peacock co-founded of a bookstore in Charleston, S.C., while Scheirer lived most of his adult life in Washington, DC. Recipients and names mentioned in letters throughout the collection include family members of all three men, as well as friends, including Carson McCullers. Other materials include documentation of Scheirer's work as a bookbinder; selected copies of Zeigler's writings and publications; photographs of all three individuals; and official military documents relating to Zeigler's and Peacock's service during WWII.