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Bedinger and Dandridge Family papers, 1752-2000 30 Linear Feet — 13,000 Items

Bedinger and Dandridge families of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York. Collection consist of journals, correspondence, poems, reviews, and other papers of the Bedinger, Dandridge, Washington, Henry Clay, and Adam Stephen families, of Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio; and of the Cornwall, Lawrence, Mitchell, Walter Bowne, and Rufus King Southgate families, of Connecticut, Maine, and New York primarily created or collected by Caroline Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The papers fall into six classes: journals and fragments of journals of Danske Dandridge (1864-1909), Henry Bedinger (1830s), and Daniel Bedinger (1811); correspondence and material on Kentucky and the northern Shenandoah Valley during the Revolutionary period; family correspondence, genealogies, and memoirs used in writing the Bedinger family history; papers of Henry Bedinger, the American Minister to Denmark in the 1850s; poems, reviews and literary correspondence of Danske Dandridge, and poems and prose of her father, Henry Dandridge, and of her daughter, Serena Catherine Dandridge; and horticultural writings of Danske Dandridge.

Collection includes the correspondence and papers of five generations of families from Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York chiefly created or collected by Carolina Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The primary portion of the collection is made up of the personal and family papers of Danske Dandridge (1858-1914), a writer and horticulturist. From 1866 to her marriage in 1877, Danske Dandridge's correspondence is concerned with social life in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and with family matters. Her literary correspondence begins in the early 1880s and continues until the year of her death. Correspondents include John Esten Cooke, Edmund C. Stedman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Thomas W. Higginson. There are sustained exchanges of letters with William Hayes Ward, editor of The Brooklyn Independent which published much of her work; with the poet Lizette Woodworth Reese of Baltimore; and Margaretta Lippincott. Material on gardening begins to appear in the papers for the 1890s and includes a large number of letters and eleven notebooks.

Danske Dandridge's family correspondence continues with here sister Mrs. J. F. B. (Mary Bedinger) Mitchell, and her brother, Henry Bedinger IV, as well as with her numerous cousins.

Correspondence of Adam Stephen Dandridge (1844-1924) reflects his career in the West Virginia House of Representatives and his business as a seller of farm machinery.

Correspondence and papers of Serena Katherine (Violet) Dandridge, daughter of Danske and Adam Stephen Dandridge, bear on her career as an illustrator for the zoologist Hubert Lyman Clark, and reflect her interest in women's suffrage and the Swedenborgian Church. There are also twelve volumes of her writings in manuscript.

Correspondence and papers of Danske Dandridge's father, Henry Bedinger Dandridge III, include letters on literary subjects from Thomas Willis White, Philip Pendleton Cooke, and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; papers from his years as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849; records of his service, 1853-1858, first as a consul and then as minister of the United States in Sweden and in particular his negotiation of the treaty with Sweden in 1857; and his notebooks containing poems and comments on social life in Virginia.

Letters of Caroline B. (Lawrence) Bedinger, mother of Danske Dandridge, to her husband's family in the South and her relatives in New York concern her experience as a young woman in Washington, D.C., and Virginia; her stay in Copenhagen; the Civil War experiences of her husband's family and her own; family life; and the education of her children.

The collection contains a large number of transcripts made by Danske Dandridge from originals in the possession of various branches of her family, including the Swearingens, Shepherds, Morgans, Rutherfords, Worthingtons, Washingtons, Kings, Brownes, and Lawrences for the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. There are also copies of letters and documents from the Lyman C. Draper manuscripts at the University of Wisconsin. Essentially, they are the papers of three brothers, George Michael Bedinger (1756-1843), Henry Bedinger II (1753-1843), and Daniel Bedinger (1761-1818), and their descendants and connections. Among the many subjects discussed are Indian warfare and conditions on the Virginia frontier; descriptions of the events of the Revolution; trading in salt and fur; experiences of Americans held prisoner by the British during the Revolution; flour milling in the Potomac valley; trade and transport of farm commodities; travel on the Mississippi to New Orleans, 1811-1812; James Rumsey and the development of the steamboat; the settling of Kentucky and Ohio, descriptions of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Baltimore at various times from 1800 to 1860; antebellum social life, South and North; and extensive comments on politics through 1860, particularly on the opposition to Federalism and the early Democratic-Republican Party.

Description taken from Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (1980).

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Francis Cope Yarnall papers, 1853-1861 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 volume, 2 folder

Yarnall's bound manuscript volume entitled "Letters on Slavery," dated 1885, discussing slavery in the American South.

The collection consists of a bound manuscript volume entitled "Letters on Slavery, F.C.Y., 1853" (88 pages) and a small number of clippings, some loose and some mounted within the volume. The spine of the book, bookplate, and the copies of the letterse all bear Francis Yarnall's name or initials, so presumably the handwriting is his. It is possible the volume is a contemporary copy because all clippings date to 1861 or earlier.

The volume has two parts: a wide-ranging discussion of slavery in the South (pages 1-25) and a series of letters (48 pages) dated 1853-1854 between Yarnall and Professor M. in New York, in which the discussion is continued. Yarnall toured the South and his initial article is dated March 1853 in Huntsville, Alabama. He wrote that he was opposed to slavery, but did not advocate sudden abolition. He was sensitive to the complexity of the subject, and presents a comprehensive assessment of many aspects of slavery: condition and treatment of slaves (both house and field hands); the character of black people; the character of overseers and masters; slave traders and drivers; agricultural practices in the South; treatment of runaway slaves, including the use of dogs and murder of fugitives; the impact of Northern anti-slavery movements; the reception of the Fugitive Slave Act; the prospects of colonization in Africa; and the relationship between Christianity and slavery. Yarnall appears to attempt a neutral view about these issues in his article, reiterating repeatedly that his comments are based on first-hand observations and inquiries.

He is more hostile to slavery in the subsequent letters between himself and Professor M. Professor M. defended slavery on practical, religious, and philosophical grounds. Yarnall attacked slavery in his return letters. It is unclear whether Professor M. is an actual person or a literary device. All of the volume's letters are in the same handwriting. Additional topics include: the condition of blacks in Africa; labor in the North; inequality as a condition of life; white men's potential to elevate other races; prejudice between North and South; Jamaica's emancipation; the deaths of leaders Clay, Calhoun, and Webster; the Nebraska Bill; and Southern slavery laws.

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Gales & Seaton records, 1811-1868 1 Linear Foot — 297 Items

Collection contains the business papers of Joseph Gales, Jr., and William W. Seaton, editors of the National Intelligencer. Correspondence pertains to subscriptions, advertising, announcements and letters to the editors. Some prominent names appear in the subscription correspondence. Of particular interest are fifty-six transcripts of Congressional speeches, resolutions, and motions. These were presented for publication and are marked for editing. Among the authors of the manuscripts are Henry Clay, James K. Polk, Martin Van Buren, and Daniel Webster. Many are signed. Part of the Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton Collection.

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James Iredell Sr. was a statesman and one of the first justices of the Supreme Court of the United States serving from 1790 to 1799. James Iredell Jr. was the governor of North Carolina (1827-1828) as well as a U.S. Senator from North Carolina (1828-1831). Topics in this collection include revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina, North Carolina's ratification of the U.S. constitution, national politics, the legal and political careers of both James Iredell Jr. and Sr., correspondence from family and friends in England and Ireland, and other family affairs.

The papers of the elder Iredell concern colonial life and Revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina; the Revolution and North Carolina's ratification of the Constitution; and North Carolina and national politics (1780s and 1790s); and include early letters from friends and relatives in England and Ireland, including the Macartney family. Most of the correspondence between 1799 and the War of 1812 concerns family and business matters. Papers of James Iredell, Jr., pertain mostly to his legal career. Other topics include his student activities at Yale, national and North Carolina politics, naval appointments, patronage matters, the nullification crisis, and family affairs. Correspondents in the collection include John Branch, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Samuel Chase, William R. Davie, Oliver Ellsworth, Robert Y. Hayne, Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, John Jay, Charles Lee, Henry Lee, H. E. McCulloh, John Marshall, A. Nielson, William Paterson, Timothy Pickering, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., Zachary Taylor, and John Tyler.

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The collection includes papers and volumes created by John McIntosh Kell (1823-1900) of the U.S. Navy and his family. Family correspondence includes letters from John McIntosh Kell's period of service in the U.S. Navy, family and buisness papers from the Kell, Nathan Campbell Munroe, and Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe families discussing Georgia policitcs and other local events. Volumes in the collection include logs of the U.S. frigate Savannah, the U.S.S. Falmouth, and Shark. There is also an unpublished manuscript by Kell's wife and scrapbooks she maintained. Includes family legal papers, genealogical materials, writings, and miscellaneous papers.

Collection includes family correspondence consisting of letters from Kell to his mother, Marjory Spalding (Baillie) Kell; his wife, Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell; and his sisters. Beginning in 1841, Kell's letters cover the period of his service in the U.S. Navy. Topics include accounts of cruises; social activities aboard ship and on land; Commodore Matthew C. Perry; the funeral of Commodore Alexander James Dallas; the countryside in the vicinity of Cape Town, South Africa; descriptions of Montevideo and Uraguay; and references to President Carlos Antonio Lopez of Paraguay. After 1860, Kell's letters concern his duties with the Confederate Navy, including running the blockade on the C.S.S. SUMTER and the subsequent abandonment of the ship.

The collection also includes family and business papers of Nathan Campbell Munroe of Macon, Ga., his wife Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe, their daughter Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell, and other members of the Munroe, McIntosh, and Napier families. Topics include Georgia and national politics, Henry Clay and the Bank of the United States; railroad construction in Georgia; Christ Church Episcopal Parish in Macon; Montpelier Institute, Salem Female Academy, and other educational institutions; temperance; the duel between Thomas Butler King, U.S. Rep. from Georgia, and Charles Spalding; town-gown relations at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; riverboat transportation in Alabama; and the fight between the MONITOR and VIRGINIA as described by a Confederate naval officer.

Volumes in the collection include general orders and general watch and quarter bills of the U.S. frigate SAVANNAH, 1843-1847; and logs kept by Kell as midshipman on the U.S.S. FALMOUTH, 1841-1843, and on the SAVANNAH and SHARK, 1843-1847. There is also an unpublished manuscript by Kell's wife, entitled "The Life and Letters of John McIntosh Kell," ca. 1908, and scrapbooks she maintained. Includes family legal papers, genealogical materials, writings, and miscellaneous papers.

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Joseph Starke Sims papers, 1819-1903 and undated 2.4 Linear Feet — 295 Items

Correspondence, financial records, legal documents, clippings, account books, commissions, addresses and speeches, and a diploma. Correspondence concerns chiefly cotton growing, trade and prices; slaves who worked in cotton fields; financial matters; Washington, D.C. politics, with references to Henry Clay and John Calhoun; state and national politics; descriptions of newly settled areas of Mississippi and California; and a cholera outbreak in Charleston (1832). Civil War letters detail problems at Fort Sumter (1861), and often refer to economic difficulties and shortages in South Carolina. Other Civil War letters are also written from Manassas, Alabama, and Mississippi. One letter from Mississippi details the desperation of women left alone and unable to flee before the advancing Union Army. Post-war letters reveal the problems of Reconstruction in South Carolina. Many of the letters are to Sims' wife Jane Emily Sims (Farnandis).

Includes an autobiographical letter from J. K. Paulding, author and statesman, and an essay by the same, entitled "The history of Uncle Sam and his boys." Some of Sims' addresses and one of the legal documents concern Nullification, which Sims' strongly supported. Other documents include an obituary for Franklin H. Elmore, plantation and general account books, and some material on Sims' student days at South Carolina College (ca. 1817-1819), which includes a letter to his brother in 1819 "in defence of General Jackson," and his "treatment of the Indians."

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Otho Scott papers, 1772-1910 and undated, bulk 1820-1859 3 Linear Feet — Approx. 2172 Items

Lawyer of Harford City, Maryland. Collection comprises personal, legal and financial papers of Otho Scott, a Maryland lawyer active in the first half of the 19th century, and of his partner, Henry Dorsey Farnandis (1817-1900), also a Democratic state legislator. Materials include papers relating to the administration of estates, lawsuits, and land disputes; circular letters concerning the strength of Andrew Jackson and of the Whigs and Henry Clay in Maryland; a will of William Chesney providing for the manumission of his slaves; mortgages; bills and receipts; a few sheriff's books from Harford County with lists of fees for collection; papers relating to railroads and canals in Maryland, 1820s; and fragments of almanacs containing scattered diary entries, 1836-1847, chiefly about the weather.

Collection comprises personal, legal and financial papers of Otho Scott, a Harford County, Maryland lawyer active in the first half of the 19th century, and of his partner, Henry Dorsey Farnandis (1817-1900), also a Democratic state legislator. Materials include papers relating to the administration of estates, lawsuits, and land disputes; circular letters concerning the strength of Andrew Jackson and of the Whigs and Henry Clay in Maryland; a will of William Chesney providing for the manumission of his slaves; mortgages; bills and receipts; a few sheriff's books from Harford County with lists of fees for collection; papers relating to railroads and canals in Maryland, 1820s; and fragments of almanacs containing scattered diary entries, 1836-1847, chiefly about the weather.