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Robert W. Clower papers, 1920s-2000 and undated 20 Linear Feet — 11,250 items

The papers of economist Robert Clower consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Economist and faculty member of Washington University in Saint Louis, Mo., and winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1993. The papers of Douglass C. North date from 1942-2012 and consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues (the largest group), and files on conferences attended by North; there are also some teaching materials. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R. H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T. N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast.

The papers of university professor and Nobel Prize-winning economist Douglass C. North span the dates 1942-2012, with most of the papers being dated between 1970 and 2012. They consist chiefly of professional correspondence written and received by North, writings by North and other colleagues, and files on conferences attended by North. There are also materials relating to courses he taught. The collection documents North's career as an economist and professor at Berkeley, University of Washington, Rice University, and Washington University (Missouri), and reflects his interests in economics, the economic history of the western world, transaction costs, economic development, institutional change, and industrialization and technology. More specifically, the papers document his long-standing interest in explaining institutional change and political economies without relying exclusively on neo-classical economic theories. His political economy draw him closer to approaches of classical political economy.

Among the correspondents are many noted economists, including Yoram Barzel, Robert Bates, Reuven Brenner, Robert Clower, R.H. Coase, Robert Fogel, Robert Haveman, Robert Keohane, Simon Kuznets, Deirdre N. McCloskey, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elinor Ostrom, Vernon Smith, T.N. Srinivasan, John J. Wallis and Barry R. Weingast. Some of these correspondents are also represented in the Writings Series of this collection, a large group which contains drafts, notes, and reprints of writings by North as well as writings by his colleagues.

North's secretary Fannie Batt is an important factor for a proper understanding of the nature of this collection. After receiving the Nobel Prize in 1993, North's correspondence expanded substantially. Fannie Batt, his secretary at the Washington University in St. Louis, was tasked to take care of the correspondence for North. Her role impacted the subsequent arrangement of the collection. Materials are often Fannie Batt's printouts of correspondence for North. Most of the correspondence since the 1990s is carried through Fannie Batt's email address. Also, North's own responses to emails are not as frequent in the collection as one would expect. Existing responses were often dictated by North and typed by Fannie Batt.

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Axel Leijonhufvud papers, 1953-1980 and undated 4.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,000 Items

Swedish economist, currently professor emeritus at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and professor at the University of Trento, Italy. The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud date from 1953-1980 and consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory, especially as it pertains to finance; instability and disequilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general. A few items are in Swedish.

The papers of economist Axel Leijonhufvud consist of correspondence, writing, research, and lecture notes pertaining to Leijonhufvud's career as a Keynesian economist and professor. Contents range from Leijonhufvud's work at the University of Pittsburgh as a graduate student to the early years of his professorship at the University of California at Los Angeles, including a sizeable amount of written work from his time at Northwestern University as a Ph.D. candidate and lecture notes from his time at the University of Lund in Sweden. Topics in economic thought include macroeconomic theory; instability and (dis)equilibrium economics; monetary theory and policies; inflation; banking; market systems; Keynesian thought; and the history of economics in general.

The Correspondence Series includes communications from notable individuals such as Armen Alchian, Robert W. Clower (co-author), Robert Dorfman, Alan G. Gowman, Bert Hoselitz, Erik Lundberg, Gunnar Myrdal, and Joan Robinson. A few items are in Swedish. The Writings and Research Series includes Leijonhufvud's master's thesis and notes, doctoral dissertation and related research, and a variety of graduate papers in addition to drafts and published pieces; there are six subseries - Axel Leijonhufvud Writings, Class Lecture Notes, Dissertation, Graduate Work, Research and Notes, and Writings by Others. Within the latter there is a sizeable amount of unpublished and later-published manuscripts by Joan Robinson, fellow economist and close colleague.

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Paul Davidson papers, 1961-2004 and undated 13.5 Linear Feet — Apprpoximately 10,125 Items

Economist on the faculty at the University of Tennessee and editor of the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics. The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors.

The Paul Davidson Papers span the years 1961-2004 and document his professional career and interests, including post-Keynesian economics; international monetary payments and global employment policies; monetary theory; income distribution; and energy economics. The collection almost exclusively consists of correspondence files, with the exception of a few clippings and speeches folders. The most notable group of correspondents are his fellow post-Keynesians such as Victoria Chick, Alfred Eichner, John Kenneth Galbraith, Geoff Harcourt, Jan Kregel, Hyman Minsky, Basil Moore, Luigi Pasinetti, Joan Robinson, Anthony Thirlwall, and Sidney Weintraub. Other correspondents of note include Philip Arestis, Peter Bernstein, Robert Clower, Robert Eisner, Sir John Hicks, Allan H. Meltzer, Edward Nell, Don Patinkin, James Tobin, and Paul Samuelson. Other large amounts of correspondence and other materials relate to Davidson's editorial work with many major economics journals, including the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, which he founded; these folders typically contain correspondence between Davidson, journal referees, and authors. In one group of folders, Davidson engages with other colleagues in sometimes heated exchanges about bias in professional journals. In addition to correspondence with colleagues and authors, the files also contain correspondence related to academic departments where Davidson held positions. Reflecting his broad background, the papers also document Davidson's involvement with politics (see the Congress folder) and consultancy work for an energy company in his early career (the Oil and Energy folders), and his role as an active public figure, documented by letters to the editor for various maistream publications.