Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Confederate States of America. Army -- Commissariat Remove constraint Names: Confederate States of America. Army -- Commissariat

Search Results

collection icon

Fowler family papers, 1779-1870 4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume

Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

collection icon

Stonewall Jackson papers, 1855-1906 6.2 Linear Feet — 4723 Items

Confederate Army officer, from Lexington (Rockbridge Co.), Va. Collection includes correspondence, commissary papers, vouchers of Jackson's command, soldiers' leave requests, and other papers (chiefly 1861-1865). The commissary records, kept by Turner Ashby and J. H. Halsey, contain information about food in the Confederate Army. Other topics include military operations around Staunton, Va. (circa 1862), enemy movements around Harper's Ferry, a request that Jefferson County soldiers be allowed to march to Shepherdstown to vote, religious denominations opposed to war, captured property, and appointments of men to office. Correspondents and persons mentioned include James Walkinshaw Allen, P. G. T. Beauregard, Armistead Burwell, S. Bassett French, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, Mrs. Robert T. Meade, and Clementine Neal.

Collection includes personal and military papers and records of "Stonewall" Jackson (1824-1863), general in the Confederate Army. Jackson's official and personal correspondence includes requests for furloughs; vouchers; descriptions of military movements around Staunton, Virginia, in 1862; the payroll of Turner Ashby's cavalry company raised following John Brown's raid, 1859; a letter, 1855, to Jackson's aunt, Clementine Neal; two letters by Jackson's wife; a letter, 1861, from Jackson to Colonel James Walkinshaw Allen, requesting permission to allow the Jefferson County soldiers to march to Shepherdstown to vote; a letter to General P. G. T. Beauregard concerning captured property; a letter, 1862, to S. Bassett French pertaining to religious denominations opposed to war; references to enemy movements around Harpers Ferry; and appointments of men to office. Official records include the commissary records of Wells J. Hawks (1814-1873), major and chief commissary of subsistence to Generals Jackson, Ewell, and Early, and of William B. Warwick, major and commissary for General Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Division; the commissary records of John J. Halsey, captain and commissary of subsistence of the 6th Virginia Cavalry; and the quartermaster records of William Miller, captain and assistant quartermaster of the 7th Virginia Cavalry.