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The Devereux family lived in Raleigh, N.C. They were a prominent and wealthy family before the Civil War. This collection is largely concerned with personal and family affairs; the chief correspondents in the collection are Thomas Pollock Devereux (1793-1869), his sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Devereux, his son John Devereux (1819-1893), daughter-in-law Margaret (Mordecai) Devereux (1824-1910), and Robert L. Maitland of New York, a business associate. Subjects covered by the letters include camp life in the Civil War, plantations, slaves and real estate.

This collection is largely concerned with personal and family affairs. The chief correspondents in the collection are Thomas Pollock Devereux (1793-1869), his sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Devereux, his son John Devereux (1819-1893), daughter-in-law Margaret (Mordecai) Devereux (1824-1910), and Robert L. Maitland of New York, a business associate. A few letters relate to the Civil War careers of John Devereux, chief quartermaster of North Carolina, and his son, Thomas Pollock Devereux, and describe camp life.

Postwar papers concern land sales, lawsuits over estates, and involvement in the French spoliation claims. There are also comments on slaves and manumission, Dare County, lumbering, the Lane and Mordecai families, cranberry culture, and land surveys. There are financial and legal papers, writings of Margaret Devereux, clippings, and genealogical material; a family reminiscence by Margaret Devereux; a recipe book; a composition book of Annie Lane Devereux; a personal and professional ledger, 1821-1839, of Thomas Pollock Devereux; and a plantation account book, 1842-1863, of John Devereux, relating to Barrow, Montrose, and Runiroi plantations and giving extensive lists of slaves with names, dates of birth, purchase, or death; and other notations.

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The Funkhouser family lived in Virginia with members moving West with the expansion of the Unites States. Other Funkhouser descendants moved into Ohio, Maryland and New Jersey. The collection contains correspondence, diary and other papers, chiefly 1836-1908, of the Funkhouser family of Mount Jackson, Va. including Andrew Funkhouser. Topics discussed include conditions in the West, opposition to slavery, and economic conditions in the U.S. after 1837; Civil War letters discuss camp life of Union and Confederate soldiers and the state of the South. Post-war letters are mainly personal. Includes a diary (1863) kept by G. H. Snapp, a minister of the United Brethren in Christ Church, telling of religious life among soldiers and civilians.

The collection contains family letters and business papers of the Funkhouser family, and, after 1910, of the Miller family. Most of the papers prior to 1830 are deeds for land in Philadelphia and Virginia. There are two land patents, one signed by Edmund Randolph, governor of Virginia, to Peter Hoshaur, 1788, and one signed by Joseph Johnson, governor of Virginia, to Andrew Funkhouser, 1851.

From the 1830s there are numerous letters from relatives in Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Indiana, and Wisconsin describing the move westward, religion, railroads, economic conditions, land speculation, opposition to slavery, commerce, Indians, army forts, legal affairs, stock raising, farming, sickness and health, and the Mormon problem in Missouri. Many of these letters are from Funkhouser's son-in-law, John Kerr, a lawyer and speculator. There are also several wills and estate papers.

Civil War letters include items from R. H. Simpson with directions for his home farm and statements about Walker's and Archer's brigades on Funkhouser's land and the amount of wood they used. There is an account book mentioning Confederate Army purchases; papers relating to a claim against the United States for farm buildings, equipment and products burned or seized by order of General Sheridan; and tax in kind estimates and receipts. A diary of Rev. G. H. Snapp of the United Brethren in Christ Church, a brother-in-law of Andrew's son, Casper, discusses his circuit, revivals, conferences, and chaplains in the army; there are also many letters to Snapp down to 1900.

Other letters are from commission merchants in Winchester, Baltimore, Alexandria, and Washington both before and after the Civil War; price current bulletins from Washington, 1890s; and other business letters. Most of the letters after 1880 are from the children of Casper Funkhouser. There is a related genealogical and biographical sketch. These letters describe Shenandoah Seminary, Dayton, Virginia, 1880-1882; Bonebrake Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio; teaching at various places in Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey in the 1880s and 1890s; and family affairs. Papers concerning the family of Edward J. Miller include tax receipts, wheat allotment applications, and condolences on Miller's death.

Printed materials with the collection relate to teaching, insurance, an 1899 civil service examination, and standing orders for a mental hospital. Other business papers include tax receipts for Andrew Funkhouser, 1830-1886; tax receipts on Missouri land, 1850-1880; notes, receipts, and bills. Numerous letters refer to the temperance movement in the United Brethren Church and to Andrew Funkhouser's work as a trustee. In the 1880s there are business papers of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly.

Bound volumes include the roll of shareholders and minutes of the meetings of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly, daybooks, 1847-1861, and a ledger, 1836-1843, of Andrew Funkhouser, a list of the personal property of Jacob R. Funkhouser, 1856, and daybooks of John Bauserman, a merchant of Hawkinstown, Shenandoah County, Virginia.

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Henry W. Jones was a farmer, lawyer, magistrate, and distiller from Granville County, North Carolina.

Correspondence and Assorted Family Material is primarily personal correspondence sorted by year. One folder contains handwritten genealogical information about Jones and his lineage. Almost all of the correspondence is addressed to Henry W. Jones, though most of the correspondence came after his death in late 1871 or early 1872, and is addressed to a son, Edward H. Jones of Oxford, N.C. Nearly all of the correspondents, both before and after 1871/1872, were children and children-in-law of Henry W. Jones, most of whom resided in Hopkins Co., Ky. The notable exceptions to this are John and Alice Beasley, a son-in-law and daughter who lived in Tex., and P. H. Gooch, a nephew who lived in Farmington, Mo. Agriculture and family matters are the dominant subjects covered by the correspondence. One family matter of particular interest was an effort by some of Henry W. Jones's children, particularly Soloman W. Jones, a local Methodist preacher, to convert their father to Christianity. These same letters also document the revivals that swept Kentucky in the 1850s. There are also several letters that comment on life in the C.S.A. Army, including ones by E. H. Jones (55th Regiment, N.C. Troops) and B. F. Jones (17th Regiment, N.C. Troops).

The first portion of Legal and Financial Papers contains individual folders with records relating to Jones's career as a magistrate (tax records, election rolls, and warrants) as well personal financial information (distillery taxes and personal tax receipts). The remainder of the series is general financial and legal correspondence sorted by year. This series also contains several account books for business partnerships between Jones and his father-in-law, David Parker.

The final series--Printed materials, clippings, and printed work--contains newspaper clippings, political pamphlets, and other printed material related to farming, legal issues, as well as North Carolina and national politics.

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James Burchell Richardson was a plantation owner, of Sumter District, S.C. This collection contains family letters and business papers of James B. Richardson, plantation owner and slaveholder, and of his descendants. The letters and papers contain references to the allotment of slave labor for road and railroad construction; the impressment of slaves for work on fortifications during the Civil War; political wrangles; James B. and Richard C. Richardson's activities in the Confederate Army; social and economic conditions on South Carolina plantations before, during, and after the Civil War; the postwar depression and poverty in the South; and tenant farming during the postwar period.

This collection contains family letters and business papers of James B. Richardson, plantation owner and slaveholder, and of his descendants. The letters and papers contain references to the allotment of slave labor for road and railroad construction; the impressment of slaves for work on fortifications during the Civil War; political wrangles; James B. and Richard C. Richardson's activities in the Confederate Army; social and economic conditions on South Carolina plantations before, during, and after the Civil War; the postwar depression and poverty in the South; and tenant farming during the postwar period.

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James King Wilkerson papers, 1820-1929 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 896 Items

Confederate soldier, member of the 55th North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Co. K; and farmer, from Granville County, N.C. The papers of James King Wilkerson and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson and Luther Wilkerson, James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter. The Civil War letters, written by James Wilkerson to his family, contain references to the C.S.S. Virginia, detailed descriptions of marches, comments on crop conditions as he moved from place to place, his Civil War service around Petersburg, Virginia, late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865.

The papers of James King Wilkerson (1842-1919) and his family date from 1820 to 1929, and consist of Civil War correspondence, a number of almanacs used as diaries, copybooks belonging to James when he was 16 and 17, and a few other miscellaneous papers, including a genealogical sketch. There is correspondence by Lillie Wilkerson (1877-1955) and Luther Wilkerson (1874-1942), James' children, discussing social life and customs, illnesses and hospitals, employment, and personal matters; and several letters from a soldier in France during World War I. There are also two early issues of the Berea, N.C. Gazette, one from 1876, with comments on the Hayes-Tilden election, and one from shortly thereafter.

The Civil War letters were all or nearly all written by James Wilkerson, who served in the Confederate Army, 55th North Carolina Regiment, Company K, from Aug. 1861 through spring of 1865. His letters to his family are significant for their references to the ironclad C.S.S. Virginia (the former U.S.S. Merrimac); detailed descriptions of marches, including references to orders dealing with men who couldn't keep up or fell during the march; comments on the condition of crops as he moved to different locales; and references to his Civil War service around Petersburg, Va. late in the war, and his stay in the General Hospital at Greensboro, N.C. in 1865. The collection is rounded out by a copy of The Spirit of Prayer (Nathaniel Vincent, 1840), owned by James K. Wilkerson during the Civil War.

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John Berkley Grimball papers, 1727-1930 3 Linear Feet — 1610 Items

Planter, of Charleston, S.C. Correspondence and other papers of Grimball, of his family, and of the VanderHorst family. The bulk of the material is for 1840-1900 and pertains to the life of a planter during the Civil War and Reconstruction. Correspondence concerns life in the Confederate services, wartime depredations in South Carolina, the Confederate migration to Mexico and life and politics in that country after 1865, and life and economic conditions in the South during Reconstruction.

Letters and papers of John Berkley Grimball (1800-1893) of Charleston and Spartanburg, S.C., and of other members of his family; and also letters and papers of Mrs. Elias Vander Horst and others of the VanderHorst family of Charleston. The bound volumes in this collection consist of a volume of Grimball genealogy and two receipt books of the VanderHorsts. There are two charcoal etchings by W. Courtenay Corcoran, one of with is a picture of Fort Sumter in 1860 the other a picture of the East Battery, Charleston; and a daguerreotype of J. Berkley Grimball.

The Grimball papers give what is perhaps a rather representative view of the problems of the planter class of the South during the Civil War and Reconstruction. J.B. Grimball was in Charleston during most of the war, and he and his wife, who was living in Spartanburg, corresponded frequently. There were six Grimball sons: William H., Arthur, Berkley, Lewis M., John, and Harry. All of them except Harry saw service in the Civil War, four of them being in the army and one in the Confederate navy. At the first of the conflict William H. and Arthur were stationed at Fort Sumter. Later William, a first lieutenant in the 1st South Carolina Artillery, was at Fort Repley, Laurens St. battery, and Fort Johnson. After leaving Fort Sumter, Arthur was for a time at Simmons' Bluff. Berkley was on Johnson Island and at Camp Echo. Lewis M. was a surgeon in the army, and served in S.C., Georgia, and N.C. John went to the U.S. Naval Academy before the war, and served on the U.S.S. Macedonia. He wrote letters home about a trip to Tripoli and to Naples. By Jan. 5, 1861, however, he had become a lieutenant in the S.C. navy. In July 1862, he was aboard the C.S.S. Arkansas on the Yazoo River and the next year was writing from Paris and Rouen, having been also in London. In Aug. 1864, he was still in Paris, but by the next month he had gone to Liverpool. On. 24 he left there on the steamer Laurel, and on the 29th of that month boarded the Shenandoah at sea. His service as an officer on that vessel continued until Nov. 1865 when it was taken by the British into the port of Liverpool. The captain of the Shenandoah was James Iredell Waddell of N.C. The letters from these boys to their parents while in service are rather numerous. William died before the war ended.

Among the war letters of John Grimball is a twenty-page one which he started on Dec. 23, 1864. It contains information about their sailing to the desert island of Madeira and then to the two Desertas islands; a report of their transfer there from the Laurel to the Shenandoah, the of the capture of the Dolphin and the destruction of the Aline, Burk Edward, Charter Oak, Kate Prince, Lizzie Stacy, and Susan by the Shenandoah and of their sailing to the Indian Ocean. At the end of his letter he says that they have the just anchored off Melbourne. When he returned to Liverpool in the fall of 1865 he wrote of the cruises of the Shenandoah in the Pacific and Artic oceans, of the captures made, of their surrender to the British, and of their being told that the war was over and that Jefferson Davis had been captured in a pair of hoops.

Two letters of interest from H.H. Manigault to J.B. Grimball were written at his plantation near Adams Run, St. Paul's parish, S.C., in July 1863 and on Feb. 10, 1865. The former letter tells of slave revolts on Manigault and neighboring plantations and of the desertion of the slaves, and the latter makes a reference to the exodus of the people from that area.

On Nov. 13 and 15, 1865, J.B. Grimball wrote his wife telling her about the valuables which were stolen from two families by the Yankees, that a house was burned because its owner would not take the oath of allegiance, of his having seen U.S. Colored Troops for the first time, and of reports that it was "very doubtful if any of the lands -- the islands especially will be restored to the owners," that the African Americans on Fenwick's Island were armed and had announced that no white men would be allowed on the isalnd, and that the affairs on Edisto Island were in about the same shape that they were on Fenwick's Island.

There is correspondence in connection with some of the Grimballs' securing pardons from President Johnson and copies of loyalty oaths. The first postwar letters of Lewis Grimball reveal the struggle he was having as a country physician. Those of Berkley and Arthur also mention some of their problems in trying to get established. For some months after the Shenandoah reached Liverpool, John was either in England or with his Uncle Charles at Caen, France. He and other officers of that ship feared that if they returned to the U.S. they would be tried and convicted as traitors. He and two of his fellow officers finally sailed for Mexico, while five others headed for La Plata. On May 20, 1866, he wrote from Cordova of the problem of securing labor for the settlements, and of the raids of "Liberals" on two of them. In a series of letters to his parents, he says that he and other former Confederates in Mexico cannot obtain land there, because all the government grants have been taken. He discusses land prices, crops, crime, Mexican politics (including Emperor Maximilian), and a series of liberal raids. In 1870 he was in New York practicing law. All of the remainder of his letters in the collection were written from there.

Other letters demonstrating the hard times that the Grimballs faced in the post-war period come from J.B. Grimball himself. In Nov. 1865, he wrote to J.M. Porter in New York, telling him that the war had made a complete wreck of his fortunes, and that he would have to surrender his plantation to Porter and his sister, the ones from whom he had bought it. There is a contract dated Mar. 13, 1866, between Robert Deas, a freedman, and J.B. Grimball, proprietor of the Grove and Pinebury plantations in St. Paul's parish; and letters from A.R. Deas and Lewis and Arthur Grimball about affairs on J.B. Grimball's plantations.

J.B. Grimball had at least two daughters: Elizabeth and Gabriella. Elizabeth married William Munro, an attorney of Union. Another woman, Charlotte, frequently appears in the letters; it is unclear whether she is Charlotte Grimball or Charlotte Manigault (or if there are two Charlottes). There are letters to and from the Grimball daughters.

Other papers of this collection include a copy of General Orders, no. 18, Headquarters Army of Tenn. near Greensboro, N.C., Apr. 27, 1865; letter from the President of Princeton College in 1888 supporting the Anti-Liquor League; a bound volume which is a letter and memorandum book containing, among other things, letters from Ridgeville, copies of J.B. and Arthur Grimball's wills; a daybook; an account book of J.B. Grimball showing his dealings with the Bank of S.C. between 1861 and 1865; a record book of wages paid servants by Berkley Grimball between 1895 and 1899; letter written in 1896 by Elizbeth Grimball at a school in Plymouth, Mass.; letter reporting Berkley Grimball's death in 1899; memorandum book comprised of lists of shares, bonds, and dividends; tablet containing several letters from E.B. Munro; newspaper clippings, including one with a picture of Elizabeth Grimball; handbills; and invitations.

There are in this collection quite a number of VanderHorst papers. These are comprised largely of letters from S. Rutherford of Morrisania, an estate that was located in N.Y., to her sister, Mrs. Elias VanderHorst of Charleston. In one of these letters she mentions her plan to engage in establishing an infant school in Harlem, and in another she tells of having seen Pierce Butler, who reported on Gabriella and her small daughter. She also mentions John Butler.

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Mary A. Bell papers, 1846-1923 0.5 Linear Feet — 125 Items

Mary Bell's husband, C. C. Bell, was a soldier in the 16th Georgia Infantry during the Civil War. Family letters with typescripts. Many were written by C.C. Bell while in Civil War military camps in Tennessee and Georgia.

The collection consists of family letters with typescripts. Many were written by C.C. Bell while in Civil War military camps in Tennessee and Georgia.

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Person Family papers, 1754-1971 6 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

Family active in Louisburg, Franklin Co., N.C. and also in Nash Co., N.C. Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person. Addition comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

Correspondence, accounts, diary (1869), bills, deeds, wills, legal documents, and other papers (largely 1829-1897). The bulk of the collection relates to Thomas A. Person and his family, and includes letters written from Harrison Co., Tex., and New Orleans (ca. 1850s); student letters from various North Carolina schools (1835-1860); letters of Confederate soldiers concerning military life; and family and business letters with Civil War reminiscences. The early material mostly concerns Thomas A. Person's father, Presley Carter Person, of Louisburg, N.C., and the settlement of his estate. Later material concerns patent medicines manufactured by a member of the family. Other correspondents and names mentioned include W. P. Montgomery, Harriett Person Perry, Levin Perry, Theophilus Perry, Jesse H. H. Person, Joseph Arrington Person, M. P. Person, and Willie Mangum Person.

Addition (05-110) (200 items, 1.7 lin. ft.; dated 1754-1971 and undated) comprises primarily land deeds and surveys, other deeds of sale, receipts, personal wills, and other financial information. Also includes personal correspondence and memory books. An 1834 deed of gift to John W. Harris from P. C. Person includes five named slaves, one gray horse, 12 head of cattle, and 12 head of sheep. An 1808-1864 ledger book of Presley Person includes Person family genealogy and names and birth dates of his slaves and of the slaves owned by his son, Thomas A. Person. Other names mentioned include Matthew Culpepper, Arthur W. Person, Prudence Person, and W. M. Person.

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William D. Hardin papers, 1838-1946 2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 905 items.

Collection includes personal, business, and legal papers (chiefly 1870-1900), relating to retail merchandising, education, religion, politics, Masonry, flour milling, and agriculture in Guilford County, N.C. Includes school registers, students' letters and references to the Battle of Hatcher's Run, Va. (Feb. 5-7, 1865) and to conditions in the Union and Confederate armies at that time.

Collection contains personal, business, and legal papers (chiefly 1870-1900), relating to retail merchandising, education, religion, politics, Masonry, flour milling, and agriculture in Guilford County, N.C. Includes school registers, students' letters and references to the Battle of Hatcher's Run, Va. (Feb. 5-7, 1865) and to conditions in the Union and Confederate armies at that time.

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William Law papers, 1761-1890 2.4 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,863 items (including 20 vols.)

Collection has personal and business correspondence of William Law, the Dubose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage. As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel Dubose, include records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers. Included also are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, mostly post 1839, include letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839, frequent letters from member of the Cooper and Dubose families, and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often in financial difficulties. J. R. Law was a planter in the Sumter District of South Carolina and in Madison County, Fla., after 1848. Miscellaneous materials include a description of the Alabama River and environs, 1815, accounts of trips to Red Sulphur Springs and other springs in Virginia, 1835, and Civil War letters from William Law's son discussing camp life.

This collection contains personal and business correspondence and papers of William Law (1792-1868), planter, merchant, and leader of the local militia, the DuBose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage.

As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel DuBose, including records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers.

Also included in the collection are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Cyrus Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, largely confined to the period after 1839, fall into three categories; letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839; frequent letters from members of the Cooper and DuBose families; and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often involved in financial difficulties. Letters from James Robert Law are concerned with planting operations in Sumter District, South Carolina, and, beginning with 1848, in Madison County, Florida.

There are also a description of the Alabama River and its fertile lowlands by William I. DuBose written from Fort Claiborne, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1815; accounts of a trip to Red Sulphur Springs as well as other springs in Virginia in 1835; a long account by James R. Law relative to a marl bed on his Sumter plantation, and Civil War letters from William Law's son revealing numerous incidents of camp life.