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Alfred Landon Rives papers, 1829-1888 and undated 1.2 Linear Feet — 1,211 Items

Army engineer, Confederate officer, and architect, of Albemarle County, Virginia. Collection consists primarily of Rives' correspondence, relating to his attendance at the École nationale des ponts et chaussées, Paris; his military and civilian careers; family matters and social, political, and economic affairs in Virginia; and the Washington Peace Convention (1861). Includes a diary (1829-1831) of Rives' mother, Judith Page Walker Rives, concerning life in the diplomatic community in Paris, travels on the continent, French social life and customs, the Revolution of 1830, U.S. political developments, and other matters. Also contains three ledgers of Francis E. Rives, U.S. Representative. Correspondents include Francis E. Rives, Julia Page Rives, and Edouard Schwebelé.

The Alfred Landon Rives Papers consist primarily Rives's correspondence, relating to his attendance at the École nationale des ponts et chaussées, Paris; his military and civilian careers; family matters and social, political, and economic affairs in Virginia; and the Washington Peace Convention (1861). Includes a diary (1829-1831) of Rives' mother, Judith Page Walker Rives, concerning life in the diplomatic community in Paris, travels on the continent, French social life and customs, the Revolution of 1830, U.S. political developments, and other matters. Also contains three ledgers of Francis E. Rives, U.S. Representative. Correspondents include Francis E. Rives, Julia Page Rives, and Edouard Schwebelé.

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The Devereux family lived in Raleigh, N.C. They were a prominent and wealthy family before the Civil War. This collection is largely concerned with personal and family affairs; the chief correspondents in the collection are Thomas Pollock Devereux (1793-1869), his sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Devereux, his son John Devereux (1819-1893), daughter-in-law Margaret (Mordecai) Devereux (1824-1910), and Robert L. Maitland of New York, a business associate. Subjects covered by the letters include camp life in the Civil War, plantations, slaves and real estate.

This collection is largely concerned with personal and family affairs. The chief correspondents in the collection are Thomas Pollock Devereux (1793-1869), his sister-in-law Sarah Elizabeth Devereux, his son John Devereux (1819-1893), daughter-in-law Margaret (Mordecai) Devereux (1824-1910), and Robert L. Maitland of New York, a business associate. A few letters relate to the Civil War careers of John Devereux, chief quartermaster of North Carolina, and his son, Thomas Pollock Devereux, and describe camp life.

Postwar papers concern land sales, lawsuits over estates, and involvement in the French spoliation claims. There are also comments on slaves and manumission, Dare County, lumbering, the Lane and Mordecai families, cranberry culture, and land surveys. There are financial and legal papers, writings of Margaret Devereux, clippings, and genealogical material; a family reminiscence by Margaret Devereux; a recipe book; a composition book of Annie Lane Devereux; a personal and professional ledger, 1821-1839, of Thomas Pollock Devereux; and a plantation account book, 1842-1863, of John Devereux, relating to Barrow, Montrose, and Runiroi plantations and giving extensive lists of slaves with names, dates of birth, purchase, or death; and other notations.

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Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas was the wife of Jefferson Thomas, Confederate officer and Georgia planter. This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed copies of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

This collection contains diaries, partially unbound, for the years 1848-1849, 1851-1852, 1855-1859, 1861-1866, 1868-1871, and 1878-1889, with the first volume in a different hand from the rest. Typed version of the diaries are also included. The entries describe in detail Mrs. Thomas' reading; studies at Macon Female College (now called Wesleyan College) in Macon, Ga.; conversion to methodism; clothing and dress styles; gossip and social life; shopping and prices; church services; courtship by and marriage to Jefferson Thomas; and plantation life in Burke and Columbia counties.

Other subjects discussed include black religion; the institution of slavery and the relations between white men and slave women; Civil War military activities, especially concerning Jefferson Thomas' career; destruction of property by Union troops; social conditions after the war; spiritualism; labor and servant problems, financial losses and poverty; school teaching; and the earthquake of 1886.

Other items include letters (two from Jefferson Thomas); photograph of a portrait of Mrs. Thomas; and a life membership certificate from the National Woman Suffrage Association of the United States (later the National American Woman Suffrage Association).

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Hinsdale Family papers, 1712-1973 16 Linear Feet — 2557 Items

This collection centers around John Wetmore Hinsdale (1843-1921), a successful lawyer and businessman who served in the Confederate army. His son, John Wetmore Hinsdale, Jr., was also a lawyer and politician in North Carolina. Correspondence, Civil War diaries, newspapers clippings, C.S.A. War Dept. records book, and other papers, of a family of lawyers, of Raleigh and Fayetteville, N.C. Includes material on Confederate generals Theophilus Hunter Holmes, William Dorsey Pender, and James Johnston Pettigrew; schools, education, railroad taxation, and legislation, government and politics in North Carolina, particularly during the 1930s; and medical practice in Virginia ca. 1900. Persons represented include Ellen Devereux Hinsdale, John Wetmore Hinsdale, and John Wetmore Hinsdale, Jr.

The collection is arranged as follows: Correspondence (1819-1971); Political correspondence (1930-1935); Financial papers (1864-1961); Legal papers (1712-1926); Miscellany; Clippings (1856-1973); Writings (1784-1950); Printed material (1915-1970); Genealogy; Pictures; Volumes; and Oversize folders.

Papers of John Wetmore Hinsdale (1843-1921), lawyer and businessman, relate to his education, courtship, military service, and other activities. The collection contains letters and a diary, 1860-1864, concerning his education at a boarding school in Yonkers, New York, and at the University of North Carolina, 1858-1861; his service in the Confederate Army as aide-de-camp to his uncle, General Theophilus Hunter Holmes, and adjutant to General James Johnston Pettigrew and General William Dorsey Pender, including descriptions of troop movements, comments on many Confederate officers, and accounts of the battle of Seven Pines, the Seven Days' battle, and the battle of Helena; the effects of the Civil War on Southerners at home; and events during Reconstruction. The diary includes excellent descriptions of the battles in which he participated, as well as descriptions of men like Generals Holmes, Pender, Pettigrew, P.G.T. Beauregard, A.P. Hill, Benjamin Hunter, Stonewall Jackson, J.E. Johnston, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, J.B. Magruder, Sterling Price, G.W. Smith, and others.

Other sources of information in the collection on the Civil War include the C.S.A. War Department Records Book, a partially indexed, bound collection of orders, circulars, and letters from the War Department and Bureau of Conscription to General Holmes during the period 1863-1865. It is useful for learning Confederate policies about conscription, court-martials, impressment of slaves and freedmen for work on Confederate fortifications, and the Invalid Corps.

Letters between 1861 and 1865 contain information about civilian life during the war, particularly in Fayetteville, N.C., and Little Rock, Ark.; what women did for the war effort; and the fears and morale of civilians. Information about Reconstruction appears in the letters during the period 1865-1870.

Several notebooks from Hinsdale's years in law school are contained in the Volumes series. The collection also includes 25 letterpress books, most of which are indexed, covering the years 1886-1892, with a few breaks in the run (Hinsdale numbered them consecutively, and this run contains volumes 69-101, with volumes 77, 79, 87, 88, 93, 95, and 96 missing). The letterpress books, besides containing entries of an ordinary legal nature, contain information on N.C. government and politics, taxation, roads, railroads, and finances. Volumes 99-101 of the letterpress books deal exclusively with the Carolina Brownstone company, in which Hinsdale was part-owner and president. The company either did not last very long, or it changed hands, because it does not appear in the N.C. list of corporations for 1902-1904. There are also a volume of claim records, 1889-1890, and a collection book, 1870-1876, both concerning Hinsdale's legal practice, and a ledger, 1873-1875, from the Diamond Cotton Chopper and Cultivator Company of Fayetteville, North Carolina, containing accounts for customers and agents, many of which are annotated with remarks about the individual's occupation, character, reliability, and financial circumstances.

The papers of Ellen (Devereux) Hinsdale, wife of John W. Hinsdale, contain material pertaining to the General Pettigrew Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy; the Daughters of the American Revolution; and the Ladies' Hospital Aid Association of Rex Hospital, Raleigh, North Carolina, including minute books for that organization, 1896-1902, which record the activities of the ladies in fund-raising drives, social events, and sewing bees.

During the 1890s, the focus of the collection switches from John W. Hinsdale and Ellen D. Hinsdale to their children. Papers include the courtship letters, 1903-1904, of Elizabeth Christophers Hinsdale and Jack Metauer Winfree, a physician and instructor at the Medical College of Virginia, including comments by Winfree on his work; courtship letters, 1908, of Annie Devereux Hinsdale and Harold Vincent Joslin, and letters concerning World War I, including an account of Ellen D. Hinsdale's decision to join the American Red Cross in France and descriptions of working conditions in a war industry. The courtship letters of Elizabeth C. Hinsdale and Dr. Jack Metauer Winfree in 1903-1904 and of Annie D. Hinsdale and Harold Vincent Joslin in 1908 form a large bulk for this period. Dr. Winfree was a prominent physician and instructor at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond, and his letters give an interesting view of a medical practice at the turn of the century.

The papers, 1930-1935, of John W. Hinsdale, Jr., pertain mainly to his political career as a state senator from Wake County, North Carolina, and as a candidate for governor of North Carolina, 1932, and contain material reflecting his interest in changing the state tax structure, organizing the North Carolina State Board of Health and the North Carolina Board of Examiners, and establishing state control over maintenance of country roads. Also includes material on the conflicts with the R.J. Reynolds Company.

The collection contains a series of legal papers, 1712-1926, and a series of financial papers, 1864-1961. Miscellaneous items include clippings of Civil War reminiscences, weddings and deaths, and the legal career of John W. Hinsdale, Sr.; an oversize 1847 map of Raleigh showing locations of buildings and ownership of land; family photographs and family writings; genealogical material on the Hinsdale, Devereux, Lane, and Pollock families of North Carolina, the Livingston and Bayard families of New York, and the Johnson and Edwards families of Connecticut; and a volume containing diary entries; school notes on different subjects; and autograph books from John Hinsdale, Sr.'s, years at the University of North Carolina

One volume of interest is the "Liverpool Memorandum-Book," which contains a diary, memoranda, and accounts for 1755 (which a few scattered entries for other years). The anonymous author of this volume lived near Hertford in Perquimons County, N.C. Entries record travel in Bertie, Chowan, Perquimans, and Pasquotank counties. The diarist frequently went to "town," and several references indicate that his residence was close to it. The "town" was apparently Hertford. The volume may have belonged to a member of the Pollack family, since Mrs. Ellen Hinsdale was a descendent through the Devereux line and since they resided in Perquimans during the 1750s.

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Jonathan Kennon Smith papers, 1649-1988 4 Linear Feet — 8 boxes, 477 items

This collection holds miscellaneous papers (192 items; dated 1649-1971) including originals and copies of letters, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Pearson, Smith, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas; letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tenn.; copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regt., C.S.A.; anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; Melton family genealogy; and Smith family albums. A later addition (283 items, dated 1774-1986) includes information pertaining to the genealogy of several related families (including the Thompson and Wyly families, as well as information on the descendants of Col. Samuel and Mary Webb Smith). Includes printed works on genealogy and other topics compiled by Emma C. C. Brown and Jonathan K. T. Smith (primarily Smith). Also includes: correspondence; legal documents; copies of church records; clippings; writings about the history of Benton County, Tenn., and some of its citizens and communities; photographs; printed and other material on Camden, Tenn.; copy of the diary of Anne William Smith; copy of a portrait of Anne William Smith by Gustavus Grunewald (1847-1848); a recording entitled The Remembrance Pilgrimage about the Smith family of Nymcock, Tenn.; A Century with St. Mark's: An Informal History by Clara L. Cape; and an extensive biographical sketch on Col. Maurice Smith.

This collection is largely genealogical in nature and holds miscellaneous papers of Jonathan Kennon Thompson Smith including originals and copies of letters, papers, Bible records, pictures, and printed works relating to the history of the Smith, Pearson, and Thompson families who migrated from England to Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and finally to Arkansas. The Smith family descended through Maurice Smith (1801-1871) of Person County, North Carolina who later moved to Fayette County, Tennessee in 1831, and finally to Dallas County, Arkansas in 1843.

In addition to family correspondence of Maurice Smith (1801-1871); the collection has letters, legal papers, historical notes, genealogy, military records, cemetery records, pictures, and maps pertaining to the history of Benton County, Tennessee. Copies of the Civil War letters of Stephen W. Holliday, 55th Tennessee Regiment, C.S.A., to his parents, a history of Tulip and Tulip Ridge, Arkansas, by Smith entitled The Romance of, Tulip (Memphis: 1965), On this Rock . . . the Chronicle of a Southern Family, which is a history by Smith of the family of Colonel Samuel Smith and Mary Webb Smith of Abram's Plains, North Carolina; biographies of the Captain Nicholas Martian (1591-1657) and of Samuel Granville Smith (1794-1835); anecdotes of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest; a history of the Pearson family by Smith entitled This Valued Lineage; history of the Thompson family by Smith entitled These Many Hearths; albums of the Smith family containing pictures, clippings, and copies of letters and wills dating as early as 1649; genealogy of the Melton family by Herman E. Melton entitled Sassafras Sprouts; an anthropological study of the Indians of Kentucky Lake, Tennessee, by C. H. McNutt and J. Bennett Graham; and a pamphlet, 1961, by Smith entitled A Statement of Faith.

There is a microfilm copy of 'The Remembrance Pilgrimage. The Story of a Southern Family' (1964) available.

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Stonewall Jackson papers, 1855-1906 6.2 Linear Feet — 4723 Items

Confederate Army officer, from Lexington (Rockbridge Co.), Va. Collection includes correspondence, commissary papers, vouchers of Jackson's command, soldiers' leave requests, and other papers (chiefly 1861-1865). The commissary records, kept by Turner Ashby and J. H. Halsey, contain information about food in the Confederate Army. Other topics include military operations around Staunton, Va. (circa 1862), enemy movements around Harper's Ferry, a request that Jefferson County soldiers be allowed to march to Shepherdstown to vote, religious denominations opposed to war, captured property, and appointments of men to office. Correspondents and persons mentioned include James Walkinshaw Allen, P. G. T. Beauregard, Armistead Burwell, S. Bassett French, Mary Anna Morrison Jackson, Mrs. Robert T. Meade, and Clementine Neal.

Collection includes personal and military papers and records of "Stonewall" Jackson (1824-1863), general in the Confederate Army. Jackson's official and personal correspondence includes requests for furloughs; vouchers; descriptions of military movements around Staunton, Virginia, in 1862; the payroll of Turner Ashby's cavalry company raised following John Brown's raid, 1859; a letter, 1855, to Jackson's aunt, Clementine Neal; two letters by Jackson's wife; a letter, 1861, from Jackson to Colonel James Walkinshaw Allen, requesting permission to allow the Jefferson County soldiers to march to Shepherdstown to vote; a letter to General P. G. T. Beauregard concerning captured property; a letter, 1862, to S. Bassett French pertaining to religious denominations opposed to war; references to enemy movements around Harpers Ferry; and appointments of men to office. Official records include the commissary records of Wells J. Hawks (1814-1873), major and chief commissary of subsistence to Generals Jackson, Ewell, and Early, and of William B. Warwick, major and commissary for General Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Division; the commissary records of John J. Halsey, captain and commissary of subsistence of the 6th Virginia Cavalry; and the quartermaster records of William Miller, captain and assistant quartermaster of the 7th Virginia Cavalry.