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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Herbert Scarf (1930-2015) was an economist and mathematician, and worked as a professor of economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings, as well as his collaborations and professional affiliations across the fields of economics, mathematics, and operations research.

The Herbert Scarf Papers document his career as an economist and mathematician. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the computation of economic equilibrium and fixed points, stability of general equilibrium, the core of many-person games and its relation to general equilibrium, integer programming, and problems of production with indivisibilities. Much of Scarf's work serves as the basis for applied general equilibrium models, and as a precursor to modern computational and simulation approaches to economics.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communications with prominent economists and mathematicians such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Ralph Gomory, Terje Hansen, Werner Hildenbrand, Tjalling Koopmans, Harold Kuhn, Lloyd Shapley, John Shoven, Martin Shubik, John Whalley, and many others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Scarf's leadership roles in the American Economic Association, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Econometric Society, and other organizations; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions in the economics, operations research, and applied mathematics programs at Yale University.

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Lionel W. McKenzie papers, 1942-2004 and undated 22 Linear Feet — 16,500 Items

Lionel McKenzie (1919-2010) was an economist whose main areas of research were general equilbrium theory and turnpike theory. McKenzie began his career as an assistant professor at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 before becoming chairman of the Economics Department at the University of Rochester in 1957, where he taught until his retirement in 1989. McKenzie also served on a number of prominent international economic organizations, where he helped to further the discourse in the discipline. Collection contains correspondence, writings, research notes, and other written material from throughout McKenzie's career. The papers span the years 1942-2004 and document his work as an economic theorist and educator.

The Lionel W. McKenzie Papers span the years 1942 to 2004, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence, research notes, article drafts, teaching material, lectures, and published materials, the collection provides a broad overview of his professional career. McKenzie's greatest contribution to economics has been through his work in conjunction with Kenneth Arrow and Gerard Debreu on general equilibrium, and his writings on capital theory and turnpike theory, all of which are documented in a variety of forms throughout the collection. Significant correspondents include noted economists Paul Samuelson, Tjalling Koopmans, and Robert Solow. Other aspects of his career are documented, such as his involvement in a number of economic organizations, especially the Econometric Society and the Mathematical Social Sciences Board; his role as organizer of a number of academic conferences, such as the Value and Capital Conference of 1988; and his teaching career at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 and at the University of Rochester from 1957 to 1989. The papers are organized into the following series: Conferences; Correspondence; Course Materials; Organizations; Personal Files; and Research and Writings.

The Conferences Series includes material from conferences McKenzie attended and organized throughout his career and includes copies of programs, articles given, and other related documents. The Correspondence Series, the largest of the collection, contains largely official and routine correspondence, but also includes a sizeable number of letters on intellectual topics. The Research and Writings Series, the second largest, has various drafts and iterations of most of McKenzie's published work as well as some unpublished material. Many of the notes contain complicated mathematical notations documenting the theoretical foundations for his work. A small set of writings by others, chiefly on game theory and convex sets, conclude the series. The Course Materials Series houses syllabi and other materials from the seminars he taught, including many versions of the handwritten text for his general equilibrium seminar, documenting his teaching methods as well as the evolution in his thinking on the subject. In the Organizations Series, extensive documentation can be found of McKenzie's involvement with various economic organizations, including internal discussions on the workings of many of these groups. The smallest group of records, the Personal Files Series, contains curriculum vitae, personal correspondence, and other ephemera.

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Martin Shubik is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. The Martin Shubik Papers span the years 1938 through 2017, and consist of his correspondence, research, writings, and his collaborations and professional affiliations.

The Martin Shubik Papers document his career as an economist. This collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on general equilibrium, game theory, the core, oligopoly and market structure, defense and war game analysis, nuclear deterrence, behavior and risk, financial institutions, and money.

The collection also documents his collaborations and communications with prominent economists, including Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Milton Friedman, Oskar Morgenstern, John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Herbert Scarf, Lloyd Shapley, and others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Shubik's time at IBM, his consultancy work for the RAND Corporation, expert witness testimony, his role as a conference organizer and participant, and other professional activities; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Yale University.

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Roy Radner papers, 1951-2014 36 Linear Feet — 0.0028 Gigabytes

Roy Radner (1927- ) is an economic theorist and professor who has researched and taught at University of California at Berkeley, the Cowles Commission, AT&T Bell Lab, and New York University. His archival collection includes his published writings, drafts, collaborations, correspondence, and teaching materials spanning the length of his career.

The Roy Radner Papers contain 6 series. The series "Writings" (1951-2013) includes Radner's published and unpublished papers, with various materials related to them (e.g., correspondence with editors and colleagues, multiple drafts with hand-written notes, hand-written sheets of mathematical developments etc.). The series "Correspondence" (1954-2014) includes his correspondence sorted by individuals' names. Files include correspondence with and about, or only about, the individual named on a given file. There is also a set of personal files. Due to the large number of recommendation letters and other personnel-related content of the Correspondence series, this portion of the collection is restricted until 2050. The series "Teaching" (1967-2012) contains materials related to his teaching activity (e.g., syllabus, reading lists and packets, exercises with solutions). The bulk of it is largely from the Stern School (New York University) from the late 1990s to the early 2010s. The series "Research Activities" (1962-2014) includes materials about activities such as seminars, workshops, study groups and the like. Finally, the series "Writings by Others" (1954-2006) contains materials written by other researchers, with or (in most cases) without notes from Radner. There are no specific connections among the series to be noted, except the fact that, by virtue of their thematic organizations, one can find academic and administrative letters in all the series, i.e., not only in "Correspondence."

Collection contains electronic records that must be requested and accessed in our reading room. Contact Research Services with questions.