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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Democratic Digest records, 1953-1961 and undated 23 Linear Feet — Approx. 9300 Items

Official magazine of the Democratic National Committee, published monthly in Washington D.C. Its editors were Clayton Fritchey, Sam Brightman, and Philip M. Stern, with political cover art by Leo Hershfield. Collection contains editorial files of the Democratic Digest, dating from 1953-1961, with the contents of the files falling into three large categories: correspondence, editorial, and art files. The correspondence includes many letters from readers, critics, and Democratic Senators and Governors, chiefly in response to political issues of the day such as McCarthyism, corruption, civil rights, economics, labor, nuclear weapons, farm subsidies, party politics, and elections. Editorial files contain edited copy for articles and columns; TV and radio scripts, including speeches by Democratic candidates; and many clippings reprinted in the Digest. About a third of the collection consists of hundreds of pieces of original layout art, including political cartoons by Leo Hershfield and others, and a few photographs of political leaders such as Truman, Stevenson, and Johnson. Finally, a smaller group of printed materials published for the Democratic 1960 national campaign includes political leaflets, pamphlets, party platforms and position papers, a newsprint publication examining of the records of Nixon and Kennedy, and a few other items.

Collection contains editorial files of the Democratic Digest, dating from 1953-1961, with the contents of the files falling into three large categories: correspondence, editorial, and art files. The correspondence files, arranged in alphabetical order, include telegrams and memoranda between the Democratic Digest staff, the Democratic National Committee and other organizations, and many letters from readers, critics, and Democratic Senators and Governors, chiefly responding to political issues of the day, such as McCarthyism, scandals and corruption, civil rights, the American economy, labor, farm subsidies, nuclear weapons, war, and elections, and offering criticism on the content of the publication. There is also some personal correspondence.

Voluminous editorial files contain nearly complete content for issues, and are filed in publication order by month and year, 1955-1961. The files enclose copy for articles and columns, with many corrections and layout notes; condensed versions of TV and radio addresses, including speeches by Democratic candidates; and many clippings from original articles reprinted in the Digest, attached to the magazine's own copy. Some of this material is brittle and fragile.

About a third of the collection consists of hundreds of pieces of original layout art, printers proofs of covers, and political cartoons, and a handful of photographs of Democratic leaders of the time such as Truman, Stevenson, and Johnson (Box 25). For an unknown reason, there is also a portrait of Durham native and Duke alumnus and benefactor William Washington Flowers. A few complete copies of the Digest are sometimes included in the artwork files next to associated cover art. There are many examples of production artists' layout materials that include original art and sketches, and paste-ups on boards with directions for layout. The original art for the cover cartoons by noted illustrator Leo Hershfield is rendered in vivid watercolors. The artwork and layouts are loosely arranged in chronological order.

Finally, a smaller group of printed materials deriving from the Democratic 1960 national campaign includes political leaflets, pamphlets, party platforms and position papers, a newsprint publication examining of the records of Nixon and Kennedy, and a few other items.

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George Coke Dromgoole papers, 1767-1974 8 Linear Feet — 4564 Items

Planter, state legislator, and U.S. Representative, from Lawrenceville (Brunswick Co.), Va. Papers of G. C. Dromgoole, son Edward Dromgoole, and other members of the Dromgoole family, including the papers of Richard B. Robinson, George's nephew by marriage. George's papers concern family, business, and political matters and include a large number of letters dealing with plantation work and the management of slaves; items on the Democratic Party before the Civil War; and letters from Edward when he was a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Richard B. Robinson's papers include correspondence, business papers, and a daybook. Edward Dromgooles papers deal largely with legal and business matters and contain plantation records, accounts of cotton sales, and letters from tenants after the Civil War, and from a student at the Virginia Military Institute in the 1870s. The collection also includes Brunswick County, Va., legal records, including justice of the peace, county, and Circuit Court minutes, orders, summonses, warrants, and depositions. There are volumes, including daybooks, plantation books, an account book for the estate of Thomas Dromgoole, and a description of Edward Dromgoole's home and family genealogy.

The correspondence and papers of Edward Dromgoole, prominent planter of Brunswick Co., Va., during the latter half of the nineteenth century, and sometime lawyer at South Gaston, N.C. The letters and papers give an excellent account of plantation life and management just previous to and following the Civil War in Va., dealing mainly with such matters as the settlement of accounts and notes, the sale of slaves and cotton, the production of such crops as corn, cotton, and tobacco, land tenure, land drainage, labor agreements, etc. A large number of the letters to Dromgoole following the Civil War are from his land tenants, which discuss in great detail the problems of plantation management. A few plantation account sheets and Dromgoole's daybook showing plantation expenses (1892-1893) are included.

A few letters from M.M. Harrison, a student at Virginia Military Institute during the 1870s, to Dromgoole, his guardian, give much information on V.M.I. and some account of the death and funeral of Commodore Mathew Fontaine Maury, a professor at the Institute, in 1873.

Also included in the collection are bonds and obligations; land deeds; Justice of the Peace, County, and Circuit Court minutes; orders, summonses, warrants, and despositions of Brunswick County; articles of agreement for land tenure and labor on Dromgoole's plantations; various obituaries; land plats; the will of James Ledbetter of Brunswick County (Dec. 1, 1820); advertisements; numerous bills and receipts; promissary notes; and a memorandum book.

An item of especial interest in the collection is a copy of the petition for exemption from Confederate military service made by Dromgoole in 1864, in which he discusses the size and importance of the plantation under his management, both those of his own and of his wards.

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George Rust papers, 1808-1879 3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 3,343 Items

Businessman, militia officer, and Virginia state legislator, of Baltimore, Maryland, and Leesburg, Virginia. Collection houses correspondence and other papers of George Rust and of his family, relating to Rust's legislative career, his work on behalf of the Jacksonian Democrats, his investment activities in Maryland and Virginia banks and mercantile firms, and his association with the Virginia militia. Includes letters from members of the family in other sections of the United States.

Correspondence and other papers of Rust and of his family, relating to Rust's legislative career, his work on behalf of the Jacksonian Democrats, his investment activities in Maryland and Virginia banks and mercantile firms, and his association with the Virginia militia. Includes letters from members of the family in other sections of the U.S.

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Chiefly diaries but also includes correspondence, other writings and speeches, printed material, memoranda, photocopies of clippings, financial and genealogical papers, and family photographs. The collection principally relates to Newton's career as a politician and attorney as described in his extensive diaries, 1907-1984. He ran unsuccessfully as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, 8th District, N.C. in 1938, 1940, and 1942. He also unsuccessfully ran for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate in 1944.

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John Sanford Martin papers, 1915-1958 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approx. 8,602 Items

Newspaper editor from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Collection consists primarily of correspondence to and from John Sanford Martin, a newspaper editor from Winston-Salem, N.C. Letters from the 1930s to the 1940s provide information on economic and social problems in North Carolina from a number of committees on which Martin served. After 1940 there is much material on racial problems in Winston-Salem, and throughout North Carolina and the South. The correspondence from this period also reflects Martin's concern for the improvement of public education in North Carolina and his service on the North Carolina State Board of Education. Other papers relate to state and national politics, the New Deal, the Democratic Party, and the Baptist church. There are also some photographs in the collection. Significant correspondents include Josiah William Bailey, Joseph Melville Broughton, Josephus Daniels, Robert Lee Doughton, Drew Pearson, Strom Thurmond, and William Allen White.

The papers of John Sanford Martin, North Carolina newspaper editor and political figure, contain correspondence, 1912-1951, relating, for the most part, to Martin's long career as editor of the Journal and Sentinel, newspapers of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Letters pertaining to national and state politics form an important part of this correspondence and concern the presidential election of 1928 and the split in the Democratic Party in North Carolina over the candidacy of Alfred E. Smith of New York; opposition to the state sales tax in North Carolina in the 1930s; Martin's leadership in s the liberal wing of the Democratic Party in North Carolina and his attempts to bring the state party in line with the New Deal; state and national contests in the elections of 1936; an attempt by Martin and liberal Democrats to keep conservative Democrats from obtaining a federal license for a radio station in Winston-Salem; and pressures put on North Carolina Democrats to join the Dixiecrats in 1948.

Martin's professional papers, 1936-1937, deal with the purchase of the Piedmont Publishing Company, owner of the Journal and the Sentinel by the Gordon Gray family of Winston-Salem, leaders of North Carolina's conservative Democrats; the decision to retain Martin as editor of the papers; and the establishment of a working relationship between Martin and Gordon Gray.

Correspondence from the period of World War II concerns the debate over the entry of the United States into the war, politics in North Carolina during the war, activities at home, and discussions about American policy after the war, including a confidential transcript of an interview with President Harry S. Truman in 1945 on future relations with the Soviet Union and the United Nations.

Letters from the 1930s to the 1940s provide information on economic and social problems in North Carolina from a number of committees on which Martin served. After 1940 there is much material on racial problems in Winston-Salem, and throughout North Carolina and the South. The correspondence from this period also reflects Martin's concern for the improvement of public primary and secondary education in North Carolina and his service on the North Carolina State Board of Education. The collection also includes the minutes of the board of education, 1943-1953, and memoranda on school finance, legislation, integration, curricula, teacher certification and salary, textbooks, school lunches, and student loans.

Material reflecting Martin's interest in the Baptist Church includes correspondence concerning various fund raising drives within the church, Wake Forest College and its relocation in WinstonSalem, Campbell College, North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and the purchase of the Biblical Recorder by the North Carolina State Baptist Convention, 1938-1939.

Printed material in the collection pertains to temperance, the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Wake Forest University, Baptists in North Carolina, politics in North Carolina and the United States, and societies of professional journalists. There are a large number of Martin's speeches and editorials covering all aspects of his career.

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Meriwether Lewis Walker papers, 1809-1887 2.4 Linear Feet — approx. 818 Items

Papers of Meriwether Lewis, Thomas L. Walker, physician, and Peachy Harmer Gilmer, physician, residents of Albemarle and Campbell counties, Va. Collection consists largely of bills and receipts, including several relating to Gilmer's treatment of soldiers during the Mexican War, and several for the Petersburg (Va.) Female College and for Mrs. Mead's School, Richmond, Va.

Correspondence makes references to Virginia politics; the Whigs and the Democrats; the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad; abolitionism; the iron industry in Virginia; financial success of Judith Page (Walker) Rives' "Christmas Eve;" industrial development and internal improvements in Lynchburg, Va.; the Texas legislature and governor, and the University of Texas; the curriculum at Petersburg Female College; health problems caused by tobacco manufacture; and railroads. Also included are an account and memorandum book, 1853-1879, and a sketch of the Charleston, S.C., defenses.

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William Woods Holden was a journalist and Republican governor of North Carolina during Reconstruction. He was the owner and editor of the North Carolina Standard newspaper from 1843 to 1860, during which time he and the paper were affiliated with the Democratic Party. He was elected governor as a Republican in 1868, but was impeached by the Democratic state legislature in 1870 for his efforts to combat the Ku Klux Klan. Collection consists of correspondence, memoirs, business papers, legal documents, poems, and other papers. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870. Also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters.

The collection documents Holden's career as a journalist and politician, including his shift in party allegiance from Democrat to Republican during the Civil War. He served as the 28th and 30th governor of North Carolina.

Pre-Civil War letters deal mainly with personal and legal matters and with the Democratic convention in Charleston, S.C., 1860, and presidential election of 1860. Post-war materials concern the history of journalism in North Carolina; Holden's appointment by Andrew Johnson as provisional governor of North Carolina in 1865; his election as governor in 1868; Reconstruction policies; Ku Klux Klan activity in the state; the Kirk-Holden War; the "Ferrell Matter," a debt case in which Holden was the guarantor; Holden's impeachment as governor in 1870; his conviction by the N.C. Senate in 1871; his appointment as postmaster by Ulysses S. Grant in 1873; and life and politics in Washington during the period of Radical control. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870.

The collection also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters; Holden's memoirs, recorded by his daughter Mary Holden Sherwood and edited by W.K. Boyd as part of the Trinity College Historical Society; some family photographs and materials related to the Holden homestead in Raleigh, N.C.; writings and poetry by Holden and his son, Joseph Holden; obituaries and clippings about Holden and his legacy; and other assorted personal and financial papers. Though removed from public life, Holden continued to write about public policy and government, sometimes critical of both parties, until his death in 1892.