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This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. Types of materials include minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Major subjects include Duke University faculty, Duke University Administration, and Duke University Board of Trustees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. English.

This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. The collection includes minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. Materials are continuously added to this collection.

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Administrative Council records, 1959 - 1969 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Formed around 1959, the Administrative Council was composed of high-ranking Duke University officers. The Council advised the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, approved University policies, and set decision-making priorities during the 1960s. The group was also known as the Administrative Committee. Records contain minutes, memoranda, correspondence, and agendas. Major subjects include long range planning, administration, campus planning, and university policies. Materials range in date from 1959 to 1969. English.

Records contain minutes, memoranda, correspondence, and agendas. Major subjects include long range planning, administration, campus planning, and university policies. Materials range in date from 1959 to 1969.

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A. Hollis Edens records, 1949 - 1960 52 Linear Feet — 52,000 Items

Arthur Hollis Edens (1901-1968) had a long career as an educator and administrator. He served as president of Duke University from 1949 to 1960. During that time, Edens focused on fund-raising and long range planning, and oversaw the implementation of a new student union and a University Council for faculty members. The A. Hollis Edens records include correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, and other documents related to Edens's career at Duke. Among the major subjects of the collection focused on Duke University are its administration and development, the Board of Trustees, the Duke Endowment, Annual Reports from major divisions of the university, segregation, and Edens's inauguration in 1949. Prominent people in the collection include faculty member Paul M. Gross and presidential assistant Earl W. Potter. The collection also includes documents related to Edens's membership in organizations such as the U.S. State Department's Advisory Commission on Educational Exchange, the National Commission on Accrediting, the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the Southern University Conference, the Methodist Church, and the President's Committee on Education Beyond the High School. English.

Collection includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, conference materials, and other documents related to Edens's professional career. The collection is divided into eight series. The first and largest series, Subject Files, is arranged alphabetically by topic, and chronologically within each subject. Correspondence is filed by name of correspondent; miscellaneous correspondence is filed alphabetically at the beginning of each letter group. The next series, U. S. State Department's Advisory Commission on Educational Exchange, contains papers from Edens's service on this commission. The third series, National Commission on Accrediting, contains papers from Edens's service on this commission. Inauguration, the fourth es, includes material on Edens's presidential inauguration in 1949. The next series, Annual Reports to the President, contains the reports submitted to the president by major divisions of the university. The sixth series, Assistant to the President, Earl Porter (1956-1960), contains the papers of Edens's assistant. The seventh series, Segregation Policy Petitions, involves the desegregation process at Duke University. The next series, U.S. State Department, Educational Exchange Service, details Edens's involvement with that organization. The ninth series, Gross-Edens Controversy, consists of papers relating to Edens's resignation. This series is restricted. The final series is Oversized Materials and includes items from Edens's inauguration as president of Duke.

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August Kenneth Pye (1931-1994) was twice Chancellor of Duke University (1970-1971 and 1976-1982). In addition to the chancellorship, he was Dean of the School of Law (1968-1970), University Counsel (1971-1974), Acting Dean of the School of Law (1973), Dean of the School of Law (1973-1977), Director of the Center for International Studies (1982-1984), and Samuel Fox Mordecai Professor of Law (1982-1987). Collection includes memoranda, correspondence, published materials, reports, printed matter, clippings and other materials generated by the Office of the Chancellor during Pye's two terms as Chancellor (1970-1971 and 1976-1982). There are also correspondence, speeches, printed matter, and subject files collected by Pye from 1968 to 1976 as Dean of the School of Law, Chancellor, and University Counsel.

Collection includes memoranda, correspondence, published materials, reports, printed matter, clippings and other materials generated by the Office of the Chancellor during Pye's two terms as Chancellor (1970-1971 and 1976-1982). There are also correspondence, speeches, printed matter, and subject files collected by Pye from 1968 to 1976 as Dean of the School of Law, Chancellor, and University Counsel.

The first series consists of subject files created during Pye's first tenure as Chancellor, 1970-1971. Subjects include the merger of the Woman's College with Trinity College, an evaluation of the university's relationship with the Army Research Office in Durham, Duke's position on admission standards for student-athletes in the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Summer Transitional Program, international studies, the evaluation of the Navy and Air Force ROTC programs, African-American studies, the Pickets and Protest Policy and student unrest, and regulations pertaining to drug use and other aspects of student life. Administrative officers who communicated with Pye in regard to these matters include James Price, Dean of Undergraduate Education, William Griffith, Dean of Student Affairs, and President Terry Sanford.

The second series consists of subject files created during Pye's second tenure as Chancellor, 1976-1982. As Chancellor, Pye had overall responsibility for planning and budgeting at the university, and the files reflect the retrenchment and long-range planning process that occurred at Duke in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Other subjects include reports on the enrollment of North Carolina students, the admission of African-Americans, A.B. Duke Scholars from the years 1926 to 1981, financial aid and admissions, the Duke University Athletic Association (DUAA), the recruitment and admission of student-athletes, the Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics of the American Council on Education, Title IX of the Education Amendments, affirmative action, planning for the University Center (Bryan University Center), East Campus planning and residential life, the Public Safety department, black affairs, labor relations and unionization, the Nixon Library controversy, the American Dance Festival, the Marine Laboratory, and forestry, nursing, sociology, and education programs.

A subseries of the subject files created during Pye's second tenure as Chancellor, 1976-1982, is related to the Duke University Medical Center. Major subjects include Highland Hospital (Asheville, NC), the School of Nursing, and retrenchment. William G. Anlyan, Vice President for Health Affairs, is the primary correspondent within the series.

A subseries of the subject files created during Pye's second tenure as Chancellor, 1976-1982, contains files regarding various standing and ad hoc committees and files pertaining to planning committees and the University Long-Range Planning Committee. Other committees represented include the Athletic Council, Committee on the Social Implications of Duke's Investment Policies, search committees for a provost and a Vice-Chancellor for Data Processing, and the Undergraduate Faculty Council in the Arts and Sciences (UFCAS) Committee on Financial Aid and Admissions.

A subseries of the subject files created during Pye's second tenure as Chancellor, 1976-1982, consists of files created by staff assistants in the Chancellor's office, chiefly Gail Hagel and Jennifer Hillman. The files consist chiefly of information gathered in relation to long-range planning, including questionnaires, communications with members of the Long-Range Planning Committee, statistical data, and other materials.

The third series, A. Kenneth Pye Papers, 1968-1976, includes typescripts of speeches, correspondence, reports, and other material created during Pye's tenure as Dean of the School of Law, Chancellor, and University Counsel. The papers reflect matters outside of Duke University. The correspondence, spanning 1968 to 1974, includes letter from Pye's former law students and gives details about their careers and lives. Pye's responses are included. The correspondence further reflects Pye's work as an attorney and an educator, as it in part pertains to legal questions and issues. North Carolina Senator Sam Ervin and Chief Justice Warren Burger are among those who consulted with Pye on legal matters. The speeches and addresses, which are dated from 1968 to 1974, were primarily delivered at other institutions and relate to legal education and legal issues, including student demonstrations. Several subject files include reports and materials on university matters, including a public hearing on the ROTC, a 1975 report on teacher education at Duke, and reports from the Durham Urban Observatory, a joint research project between Duke, North Carolina Central University, and the city of Durham.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863 - 1961 13.25 Linear Feet — 12500 Items

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes oral histories conducted by Duke student Don Yannella in 1985 leading to his thesis Race Relations at Duke University and the Allen Building Takeover. The collection includes the original interview tapes, transcripts of the some of the interviews, and use copies of several of the original recordings.

The Allen Building Takeover Oral History Collection includes materials collected by Duke student Don Yannella while writing his senior thesis in 1985. The oral histories offer first-hand accounts of and reactions to the Takeover from Duke students, staff, administrators, and members of the Durham community.

The interviews were recorded on cassette tapes, and these original tapes are in Box 1. Access copies and transcripts for many of the interviews are included; listening copies are in Box 2 and transcripts are in Box 3.

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Arts and Sciences Council records, 1991 - 1999 3.5 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

The Arts and Sciences Council was established at Duke University in July 1991, when the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences disbanded and reconstituted itself to include some aspects of graduate studies and research initiatives. The Arts and Sciences Council is elected by the Arts and Sciences faculty and serves as this faculty's primary institution for faculty governance. The Council also determines and implements the broad objectives of undergraduate education and considers all matters affecting the academic and residential environments of students, making recommendations and adopting regulations where appropriate. Records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A & S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year. English.

Arts and Sciences Council records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A&S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. In 1992 Dean Richard White appointed the Curriculum Review Committee to evaluate the undergraduate curriculum. The records of the committee document its processes of studying the curriculum as well as its evaluation and recommendations. Surveys concerning the curriculum, which were completed by faculty as well as juniors and seniors are included. Curriculum issues reflected in the records include the Undergraduate Writing Course, requirements for academic majors, the division of the curriculum into six areas of knowledge, and academic advising. Copies of earlier curriculum studies, "Structure and Choice in Liberal Education" (1986) and "A Climate for Liberal Learning" (1980), are included.

The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year.

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A. S. Brower papers, 1939-1958 9.2 Linear Feet — approx. 5,300 Items

Brower served Duke University in the roles of Administrative Assistant, Comptroller/Business Manager and Treasurer from 1937-1962. Included in the collection are files from Brower's service to the North Carolina State Board of Education, Medical Service Association, Civil Pilot Training Program, U. S. Office of Scientific Research and Development and Duke University. The material ranges in date from 1939-1958.

The collection is divided into seven series: State Board of Education, Civil Pilot Training Program, Medical Service Association, U. S. Office of Scientific Research and Development, Duke Chapel Crypt and Oversize. The bulk of the collection pertains to the State Board of Education and the Civil Pilot Training Program and the types of materials include correspondence, reports, minutes, financial records, printed material, and photographs. Of note is the signed correspondence from architect Julian Abele in the Duke Chapel Crypt series.

Some of the paper is brittle and should be handled with care. A previous staff member attempted to remove staples from some of the material, resulting in tearing. They should also be handled with care.

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Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.