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Collection
William Preston Few (1867-1940) served as President of Trinity College from 1910-1924, and President of Duke University from 1924-1940. Few came to Trinity College in 1896 as Professor of English, was named Dean of the College in 1902, and President in 1910, succeeding John C. Kilgo. Few worked with James Buchanan Duke to establish the Duke Endowment. In 1924, Few directed Trinity College's transition to Duke University and remained as President of Duke University until his death in 1940. Few was an active layman in the Methodist Church and in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. English.

The William Preston Few Records and Papers contain correspondence from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University, reports, clippings, copies of speeches and manuscripts, memorandum books, bound volumes, index cards that catalog Few's office files, and other types of printed material. The files are arranged in six series. They include: Correspondence, Subject Files, Bound Volumes, Oversize Materials, Index Cards to Few Papers, and Additions.

Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College, from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and business of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

The Correspondence makes up a large part of the collection. The bulk of this correspondence is from Few's office files as President of Trinity College and Duke University. The correspondence includes incoming letters to Few's office, copies of outgoing letters, reports, minutes, telegrams, newsletters, and other materials generated or received by the President's office. Among the correspondents are: William Hayes Ackland, Alice Mary Baldwin, John Spencer Bassett, Julian S. Carr, Robert D.W. Conner, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, James Buchanan Duke, John Carlisle Kilgo, and Edward R. Murrow. There is also some personal correspondence dating from 1885.

The Subject Files include a wide variety of materials collected by Few's office. They include correspondence, reports, clippings and other types of printed material. Major subjects include education; philanthropy; the development of Trinity College from its beginning in Randolph County, N.C., to Duke University; the development of the Duke Endowment; Trinity and Duke departmental operations; the school's relationship with the Methodist Church; and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Included are Few's speeches made at university functions, to community groups, and at funerals. There are a number of speeches that give Few's opinions about education and the development of Duke University while he was President.

The Bound Volumes include a manuscript arithmetic primer, dated 1814, written by Alston W. Kendrick, Few's grandfather; a trigonometry textbook used by Few; a Bible; class records, 1913-1929 and undated; an incomplete set of Few's memoranda books for the years 1922-1933; and several alumni reviews.

The Index Cards to Few's Papers were apparently created by Few's office and catalog the holdings in the office files. However, not all of the materials or names referenced on the index cards can be found in the William Preston Few Records and Papers.

The Oversize Materials include folders removed from the subject files, diplomas, and a bound volume. The Additions include some correspondence, and obituaries for Mrs. William Preston Few (Mary Reamey Thomas Few), that were incorporated into the collection after it was transferred to University Archives.

Collection
In 1953, Richard L. Tuthill was appointed University Registrar in an effort to centralize the records-keeping processes of the different schools. Broadly stated, the office of the University Registrar had three major responsibilities: 1) admissions, 2) registration, and 3) student records. By 1958, the office of the University Registrar consisted of the Central Records Office and the office of Undergraduate Admissions. Following Tuthill's resignation in 1969, Clark Cahow was appointed Registrar and held the position through 1986. The collection includes grade books from Normal and Trinity Colleges from the years 1853-1926, subject files from the tenures of Tuthill and Cahow, statistical information kept on student admissions, enrollment, and grade performance at Duke University since 1925, the official schedules of courses for semesters and summer school from 1932 to the present, mailings to students from the University, departments, and campus organizations, and microfilmed copies of student transcripts from about 1932 to 1969. The subject files include information on financial aid, the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, university curricula, and the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences. English.

The collection includes grade books from Normal and Trinity Colleges from the years 1853-1926, subject files from the tenures of Tuthill and Cahow, statistical information kept on student admissions, enrollment, and grade performance at Duke University since 1925, the official schedules of courses for semesters and summer school from 1932 to the present, mailings to students from the University, departments, and campus organizations, and microfilmed copies of student transcripts from about 1932 to 1969. The subject files include information on financial aid, the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, university curricula, and the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences.

The bulk of the material covers the early 1950s and through the early 1980s, encompassing the tenures of Richard Tuthill and Clark Cahow. The records consist chiefly of correspondence, memoranda, reports, and statistical information. The records reflect the Registrar's current responsibilities for student records and registration, along with former duties concerning student admissions. Two small collections have been incorporated into the record group: 1. Clark Cahow Papers, 1958-1974 (A77-29); 2. University Schedule Committee records, 1970-1982 (A76-188 and A82-92). The Cahow Papers primarily contained records of the office of Registrar. The Schedule Committee seems to have reported directly to the Registrar's office at one time and someone from the Registrar's office served on the Committee.

Collection
Online
This collection consists of original and copy negatives taken by various sources over several decades. Most of the negatives were produced by the Office of News and Communication's News Bureau in the early years of Duke University and later by University Photography (upon its establishment).

Contains negatives and some matching prints of University-related subjects, including people (i.e. faculty, trustees, students, etc.), buildings, construction, schools and departments. While dates range from 1855-1995, it is necessary to note that the majority of the negatives are copy negatives, rather than originals. While a good number of original negatives are included in this collection, the user should be aware that some of the corresponding dates refer to when the copy negative was made, not when the original picture was taken. In most cases, it is noted on the negative sleeve if the negative is a copy or an original. Furthermore, users should be aware that some negatives are of published material. For instance, several pages from the Chanticleer and the Chronicle were photographed and the negatives were kept. On some of the sleeves, users will find notes presumably made by the photographer regarding print quality.

An attempt was made to bring a cohesiveness to the negative collection for easier patron and staff access. The negatives are arranged in the following series: Subject Negatives, General Negatives, Building Negatives, Construction Negatives, Faculty Negatives, Medical Center Negatives, and Numbered Negatives. The Numbered Negatives are copy negatives pulled from the larger University Archives Photograph Collection. Any future additions to the negative collection will follow the numbering format.

Collection
Paul Jackson Kramer, a world renowned educator, scientist and author, was professor of botany at Duke University from 1931-1995. The Paul J. Kramer Papers reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist, his participation in various scientific and learned societies including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange, and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. Major subjects include Kramer's contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. English.

The Paul Jackson Kramer Papers include correspondence, reports, writings and addresses, memoranda, research and teaching material, photographs, and printed matter. The collection reflects Kramer's career as a university professor and plant physiologist; his participation in various scientific and learned societies, including his service within the National Science Foundation and on the U.S. Air Force's Committee on the Disposal of Herbicide Orange; and his involvement in the development of the Botany Dept., the Phytotron, and Duke University. Kramer's prominence within the international and national scientific communities is attested to throughout the collection.

The Correspondence and the Subject Files series document the development of the Botany Department; the phytotron; faculty governance; and the Gross-Edens Affair, an administrative controversy at Duke in 1960. The Correspondence and Subject Files series contain Kramer's correspondence with scientists abroad. The subject files document Kramer's role in a number of scientific organizations, the National Science Foundation, learned societies, and the government. The papers are particularly useful as they provide information on cooperation among plant scientists after World War II and the early history of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

A substantial portion of the collection is comprised of correspondence that pertains to Kramer's research, the direction of graduate students, scientific organizations, matters at Duke University, and other subjects.

The Research and Teaching Notes series document Kramer's research and teaching and are useful for the study of his contributions in the field of botany, particularly plant-water relationships, the physiology of forest trees, and botanical research in controlled environments. Research notes and materials are principally located in the Research and Teaching Notes series. However, information related to Kramer's research is scattered throughout the collection. The Correspondence series as well as the Subject Files and Research and Teaching Notes series reflect Kramer's role as a teacher.

The Photographs series contains pictures of the Botany faculty.

A folder list of Boxes 5-11 is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 7 is closed pending processing.

The folder entitled "Named Professorships" is restricted by donor request.

Collection
The Duke University Board of Trustees has existed since 1924, and grew out of the Trinity College Board of Trustees that existed from 1859 to 1924. The Board is responsible for making major steering decisions in the administration of the school. The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. English.

The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. The minute book covering June 1901-June 1910 was destroyed by fire in 1911, but some handwritten minutes for the period were preserved and have been typed out. There are gaps in the minutes for the period 1925-1930.

The collection is divided into three main sections: Trinity College, Duke University, and Duke University Unprocessed Materials. The Trinity College series begins in 1860 and ends in 1924, the year Trinity College became Duke University. There are minute books, topical files, and yearly files. Because a fire destroyed the minute book covering June 1901-June 1910, some handwritten minutes have been transcribed; these can be found in the yearly files.

The second series, Duke University, covers 1924 to the present. It includes minutes of the Board and the Executive Committee, general records of the Board and the Executive Committee, reports, financial records, committees, and unprocessed materials. All materials less than 50 years old are closed except by special permission, in writing, from the Board of Trustees.

The third series, Duke University Unprocessed Materials, consists primarily of materials less than fifty years old, and so are restricted except by permission from the Board of Trustees.

Collection

University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

Online
The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.

Collection
Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

Collection
Robert Lee Flowers, born in 1870, spent his entire professional career at Duke University. From 1891 to 1951, Flowers served in a variety of capacities, including professor (1891-1924), vice president of the business division (1925-1941), president (1941-1948), and chancellor (1948-1951). Types of material in the collection include correspondence, memoranda, reports, clippings, bound volumes, and other printed material. Major subjects include higher education in the United States, the role of universities during World War II, the assistance of displaced scholars during World War II, the Methodist Episcopal Church, and organizations in which Flowers served, including the Duke Endowment, the Durham Chamber of Commerce, the Durham and Southern Railway Company, Greensboro College, North Carolina Central University, the Methodist Orphanage, the Oxford Orphanage, and the Lincoln Hospital. Major correspondents include William Hayes Ackland, George Garland Allen, Alexander Boyd Andrews, John Fletcher Bruton, Homer Hasenlue Dubs, Benjamin Newton Duke, William Washington Flowers, Allen Howard Godbey, Edward R. Murrow, Edward Hines Page, William Robertson Perkins, Alexander Hamilton Sands, Jr., James Augustus Thomas, and Horace Trumbauer. English. Volumes include two autograph albums.

Collection includes office files of the vice president and president of Duke University. The position of vice president included duties as secretary and treasurer. The official files consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports, printed matter and other materials received or generated by these offices. The first series, Correspondence is arranged chronologically, and the second series, Subject Files alphabetically. Besides University records, the subject files include material on higher education in America, the role of colleges and universities during World War II, the committee to assist displaced scholars, Methodist Church activities and administration, and records of the various organizations for which Flowers served as a trustee. The collection includes a series of several Volumes comprising Trinity grade books from the 1890s, an autograph album, an album of clippings and autographs, and a volume of letters in tribute to Flowers's 79th birthday.

Collection
Online
The Treasurer is an officer of the University whose duties have included supervision of contracts, relations with the Duke Endowment, and management of the Bursar's Office, student loans, and investments. The position of Treasurer is established by the By-laws of the University. In 1995, the Treasurer's post was taken up by the chief financial and administrative officer, the Executive Vice President. The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence to and from individuals who served the University as Treasurer and the subject files they created while in office, including grants and contracts but also ledger and account books. The collection ranges in date from 1893-ongoing.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence to and from individuals who served the University as Treasurer and the subject files they created while in office, including grants and contracts. There are a handful of photographs of Highland Hospital in Asheville, N.C. in addition to legal papers such as wills and deeds of gift. Oversize materials include many account and ledger books for the early-mid part of the 20th century. One of the many benefits of this collection is official paperwork that pertains to many artifacts/collections the University has obtained as gifts from individuals such as Doris Duke and the Trent family. The collection ranges in date from 1893-ongoing.

Collection

Henry R. Dwire papers, 1897-1944 1.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Henry R. Dwire was an alumnus of Trinity College and was appointed Duke University Vice President in 1941 and Director of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs in 1944. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, certificates and a diploma. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.

The collection contains Dwire's high school diploma, two certificates, correspondence, photographs, and clippings. The correspondence is congratulatory towards Dwire for his appointment as Duke University Vice President in 1941 and for the honorary degree he was awarded by Davidson College in 1943. Most of the photographs were taken at Davidson College. Most of the loose material was removed from a scrapbook after being transferred to the Archives in 1960. There is adhesive on many of the pages. The collection ranges in date from 1897-1944.