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Arts and Sciences Council records, 1991 - 1999 3.5 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

The Arts and Sciences Council was established at Duke University in July 1991, when the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences disbanded and reconstituted itself to include some aspects of graduate studies and research initiatives. The Arts and Sciences Council is elected by the Arts and Sciences faculty and serves as this faculty's primary institution for faculty governance. The Council also determines and implements the broad objectives of undergraduate education and considers all matters affecting the academic and residential environments of students, making recommendations and adopting regulations where appropriate. Records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A & S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year. English.

Arts and Sciences Council records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A&S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. In 1992 Dean Richard White appointed the Curriculum Review Committee to evaluate the undergraduate curriculum. The records of the committee document its processes of studying the curriculum as well as its evaluation and recommendations. Surveys concerning the curriculum, which were completed by faculty as well as juniors and seniors are included. Curriculum issues reflected in the records include the Undergraduate Writing Course, requirements for academic majors, the division of the curriculum into six areas of knowledge, and academic advising. Copies of earlier curriculum studies, "Structure and Choice in Liberal Education" (1986) and "A Climate for Liberal Learning" (1980), are included.

The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year.

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The formal study of art at Duke began with the establishment of the Dept. of Aesthetics, Art, and Music in 1942. The department was renamed the Dept. of Art in the 1959/1960 academic year, and later renamed the Dept. of Art and Art History in 1985/1986. The Department has two distinct units, one primarily devoted to the making of works of art, the other primarily devoted to the historical understanding and current interpretation of visual images and constructed space. Records include clippings, exhibit catalogs, reports, memoranda, and other records. Subjects include the B. N. Duke lectures, the James A. Thomas Memorial Room, and exhibits. Materials range in date from circa 1942 to 1985. English.

Records include clippings, exhibit catalogs, reports, memoranda, and other records. Subjects include the B. N. Duke lectures, the James A. Thomas Memorial Room, and exhibits. Materials range in date from circa 1942 to 1985.

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The Duke University Dept. of Anthropology was formed in the 1972/1973 academic year, after the joint Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, which had existed from 1941 to 1972, split into two separate departments. In July 1988, the disciplines in the Dept. of Anthropology divided into the Dept. of Cultural Anthropology and the Dept. of Biological Anthropology and Anatomy. The Dept. of Cultural Anthropology focuses on the study of cultures around the world. Records include two brief subject files including clippings and a newsletter, as well as a few documents relating to the Anthropology Majors Union, from the 1970s. In addition, the records include a syllabus and selected course papers from Cultural Anthropology 105.S01: Campus Politics, taught by Orin Starn in 1992. English.

Department of Cultural Anthropology records include two brief subject files dating from the 1970s, when the Anthropology Department included all cultural and biological subdisciplines in one academic department. The files include clippings and a newsletter, as well as a few documents relating to the Anthropology Majors Union. In addition, the records include a syllabus and selected course papers from Cultural Anthropology 105.S01: Campus Politics, taught by Orin Starn in 1992. Most of the course papers focus on cultural phenomena at Duke University; some papers are restricted, see below for details.

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Humanities Council records, 1961 - 1979 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

The Humanities Council of Duke University was created in 1961 to give attention to various matters affecting the humanities departments as a whole, including the advancement of research, interdepartmental and inter-institutional programs, and support for various humanistic activities. The Humanities Council records consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, clippings, and printed programs relating to planning, resource allocation, curriculum, and state of the humanities at Duke University from 1961 to 1979. Major subjects include graduate studies in anthropology, the Department of Music, the Museum of Art, medieval and renaissance studies, the American Comparative Literature Association, the Cooperative Program in the Humanities between Duke and the University of North Carolina, and the National Humanities Center. English.

The collection consists of records relating to planning, resource allocation, curriculum, and state of the humanities at the University as dealt with by the Committee. Correspondence, memoranda, reports (typed and annotated), minutes, clipping, charts, projections, and printed programs comprise the bulk of this collection. There exist some materials that are not created out of the general functioning of the committee. These materials, while not being direct results of committee work, help to better understand the functioning and role of the Committee in the life of the University. These materials are mainly dedications programs and leaflets, reports, booklets, and reports from outside bodies, such as the American Comparative Literature Association.

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Interdisciplinary Studies records, 1998-2006 31.5 Linear Feet — 23,000 Items

Duke University's strategic plan emphasizes interdisciplinary studies because important teaching, learning, and research often occur across the traditional boundaries of disciplines, departments, or schools. Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke University became an office under the direction of the Provost with the appointment of the first Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies in 1998. Prior to this, direction of interdisciplinary studies was a responsibility of the Dean of the Graduate School/Vice Provost for Graduate Education. Records contain subject files, correspondence, reports, and planning documents related to Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke, including the Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies, the Franklin Humanities Institute, Information Science and Information Studies, Women's Studies, Science Technology and Human Values, the Black Faculty Initiative, the University Scholars Program, global health, arts and humanities, the arts warehouse, development and grants, and faculty involvement with interdisciplinary teaching.

Records contain subject files, correspondence, reports, and planning documents related to Interdisciplinary Studies at Duke, including the Franklin Center for Interdisciplinary and International Studies, the Franklin Humanities Institute, Information Science and Information Studies, Women's Studies, Science Technology and Human Values, the Black Faculty Initiative, the University Scholars Program, global health, arts and humanities, the arts warehouse, development and grants, and faculty involvement with interdisciplinary teaching.

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The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity. There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included. Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity.There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included.Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

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Since its inception in 1969, the Office of Minority Affairs (formerly known as the Office of Black Affairs and currently the Office of Intercultural Affairs) has primarily addressed the needs of the African American student population at Duke University, providing an organizational structure through which Black participation in the University and local communities can obtain the greatest degree of effectiveness. The collection contains a variety of administrative materials, including reports, correspondence, minutes and programs, documenting the directives and activities of the Office of Minority Affairs. Also included are materials pertaining to the Summer Transitional Program, which was established in 1969 and managed by the Office of Minority Affairs.

The Office of Minority Affairs' records spans the years 1969-1993. The collection is arranged into three series: Administrative Records, 1969-1993; Scrapbooks, 1968-1991; and Summer Transitional Program, 1969-1986.

Materials in the collection include administrative records, correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, course schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, financial information, photographs, programs, scrapbooks, and other materials from the Office of Minority Affairs.

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In 1953, Richard L. Tuthill was appointed University Registrar in an effort to centralize the records-keeping processes of the different schools. Broadly stated, the office of the University Registrar had three major responsibilities: 1) admissions, 2) registration, and 3) student records. By 1958, the office of the University Registrar consisted of the Central Records Office and the office of Undergraduate Admissions. Following Tuthill's resignation in 1969, Clark Cahow was appointed Registrar and held the position through 1986. The collection includes grade books from Normal and Trinity Colleges from the years 1853-1926, subject files from the tenures of Tuthill and Cahow, statistical information kept on student admissions, enrollment, and grade performance at Duke University since 1925, the official schedules of courses for semesters and summer school from 1932 to the present, mailings to students from the University, departments, and campus organizations, and microfilmed copies of student transcripts from about 1932 to 1969. The subject files include information on financial aid, the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, university curricula, and the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences. English.

The collection includes grade books from Normal and Trinity Colleges from the years 1853-1926, subject files from the tenures of Tuthill and Cahow, statistical information kept on student admissions, enrollment, and grade performance at Duke University since 1925, the official schedules of courses for semesters and summer school from 1932 to the present, mailings to students from the University, departments, and campus organizations, and microfilmed copies of student transcripts from about 1932 to 1969. The subject files include information on financial aid, the Consortium on Financing Higher Education, university curricula, and the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences.

The bulk of the material covers the early 1950s and through the early 1980s, encompassing the tenures of Richard Tuthill and Clark Cahow. The records consist chiefly of correspondence, memoranda, reports, and statistical information. The records reflect the Registrar's current responsibilities for student records and registration, along with former duties concerning student admissions. Two small collections have been incorporated into the record group: 1. Clark Cahow Papers, 1958-1974 (A77-29); 2. University Schedule Committee records, 1970-1982 (A76-188 and A82-92). The Cahow Papers primarily contained records of the office of Registrar. The Schedule Committee seems to have reported directly to the Registrar's office at one time and someone from the Registrar's office served on the Committee.

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The President's Committee to Address Discrimination in the Classroom (PCADC) was created in April 1988 to address allegations of discrimination at Duke and offer recommendations on how to reduce or eliminate this discrimination. PCADC issued their final report in February 1989. The President's Committee to Address Discrimination in the Classroom records include the results of a student survey to assess discrimination, descriptive statistics, PCADC's final report, and other materials.

The collection includes materials related to the work of the President's Commission to Address Discrimination in the Classroom (PCADC), particularly the results of the student survey conducted by the Commission. Included are completed surveys, compiled survey descriptive statistics, correspondence among PCADC, research materials, responses from other universities on discrimination policies, and copies of the final report. Survey responses and data do not include personally identifying information.

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The Duke University Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (UFCAS), established in 1971, guided undergraduate education in arts and sciences, adopted academic regulations and admissions policies, advised on financial aid and recognized academic achievement. It succeeded the Undergraduate Faculty Council after the body no longer included representatives from the engineering and nursing schools. In 1991, UFCAS voted to disband and reorganize as the Arts and Sciences Council. Records include bylaws, minutes, correspondence, memoranda, rosters, reports, and other records of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Most of the records were created by the UFCAS Committees, which included: Curriculum, Courses of Instruction, Honors, Study Abroad, Program II, Academic Standards, Advising, Undergraduate Admissions and Financial Aid, Residential Life, Freshman Year, Advanced Placement, Athletics and Recreation, Health Science Education, and Non-western Studies. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1991. English.

Records include bylaws, minutes, correspondence, memoranda, rosters, reports, and other records of the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. The Program II files contain some identifiable student records and are regulated by FERPA. The records also contains materials from a prior body, the Undergraduate Faculty Council, which concern ongoing matters.