Collections : [Duke University Archives]

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Duke University Archives
Duke University Archives

The Duke University Archives is the official repository for records of Duke University and has a charge to make them available for use in accordance with policies approved by Duke University's Board of Trustees, administration and faculty. In addition to the official records of the university, the Duke University Archives holds campus publications; audiovisual materials by and about Duke University; papers and selected publications of Duke University faculty members; records of Duke University student and employee organizations and dissertations, theses, final projects and senior honors papers produced by Duke University students.

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Collection
This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. Types of materials include minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Major subjects include Duke University faculty, Duke University Administration, and Duke University Board of Trustees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. English.

This collection contains materials of the Academic Council, established at Duke University in 1962. The Academic Council is a group of faculty members who provide representation of the body of Duke University faculty to the Administration, Board of Trustees, and other decision-making groups. The collection includes minutes and associated materials, memoranda and correspondence, council and committee membership lists, new committee charges, reports, bylaws, policy documents and related proposals, financial records, and other records of the Academic Council and its committees. Materials range in date from 1954-2000. Materials are continuously added to this collection.

Collection

Alan K. Manchester papers, 1905-1975 2 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Alan K. Manchester (1897-1983) served as a faculty member in the Department of History at Duke University (1929-1967). Administrative positions held at Duke include Assistant Dean of Trinity College (1934), Dean of Freshmen (1935-1949), Dean of Undergraduate Studies (1949-1956), and Dean of Trinity College (1956-1964). Manchester also worked as a cultural affairs officer at the United States Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (1951-1952) and as a specialist for the U. S. State Department's International Exchange Service Program (Summers of 1954-55). Papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator. Major subjects include Latin American and South American history and economic and political relations between Brazil and Great Britain. The majority of the material is in English. Some material is in Spanish and Portuguese.

Collection consists of correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries, bulk 1929-1970. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator

Collection

Allan H. Bone papers, 1944 - 1989 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Allan H. Bone (1917-1992) spent nearly forty years in the Duke University Department of Music. He served as professor of music, chair of the department, and conductor of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners. English.

The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners.

Collection

Allan Murray Cartter papers, 1955-1959 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Allan M. Cartter was a professor of Economics and Dean of the Graduate School at Duke from 1959 to 1962. The collection contains two book manuscripts, for The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). The collection ranges in date from 1955-1959.

Collection contains manuscripts of two of Cartter's published books: The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). Items were untied and foldered for processing. It ranges in date from 1955-1959.

Collection
The purpose of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good. The collection includes correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the American Association of University Professors from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. English.

Correspondence, reports, proceedings, memoranda, and other materials of the AAUP from the period when Duke University faculty member William T. Laprade was chairman of its Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure (1937-1942, 1948-1953), and president (1942-1943). A sample of the folders shows material concerning academic freedom cases, dismissals, quality of educational support and other matters of concern to the organization's membership. Series 1 consists of correspondence relating to concerns expressed to the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure (Committee A), along with a few reports. Series 2 is made up of the Proceedings noted below. Series 3 appears to be the correspondence files from the office of the Association's President, but there are no folder titles and no apparent order.

Collection
Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan was a professor of French at Duke University from the 1960s through the 1990s. The Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan Papers include biographical materials, writings, a textbook, and other materials from her life in France and at Duke University.

The collection consists of photographs, writings, and memorabilia from Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan's life and work as a professor of French at Duke University. Photographs span Anne-Marie Bryan's life and include images of her family, including her husband and children; the majority of the images are reproductions of originals. Writings include a copy of her textbook Fast French (published posthumously), a typed manuscript copy of a memoir in French as well as selections from a separate memoir in English. Also included are copies of some artwork created by Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan, a biography written by her daughter Yvonne Bryan Tomek, and poems about her life written by her son-in-law and former student, James Tomek.

Collection

Arlin Turner papers, 1953-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 600 Items

Arlin Turner was a professor in Duke's English Department from 1953 to 1978 and served as department chair during 1958-1964. The collection includes department memoranda, correspondence, minutes and documentation relating to English Department policies. Also included are minutes, memoranda and correspondence related to various committees Turner served on. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

Collection includes council and committee records including memos, correspondence, minutes of the University Council, the Humanities Council, the Undergraduate Faculty Council and the Graduate Affairs Committee of the University Planning Committee. There are also records of the English department, including minutes, correspondence, and memoranda. Files relating to student grades and personnel decisions were destroyed. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

Collection

Art Association records, bulk 1930-1938 1 Linear Foot — 1000 Items

The Duke University Art Association was formed by William K. Boyd in 1930. The Association planned and organized art exhibits, gallery talks, and other art appreciation activities on the Duke campus until the early 1940s. Collection includes minutes, correspondence, photographs, exhibit catalogs, lists of objects, membership lists, and related materials. Major subjects include faculty spouses, art appreciation, the Woman's College Library, the American Federation of Arts, the Carl Shurz Memorial Foundation for the Development of Cultural Relations Between the United States and Germany, the College Art Association, and the Southern States Art League. The bulk of the materials range in date from 1930 to 1938. English.

The Art Association Records include minutes, correspondence, photographs, exhibit catalogs, lists of objects, membership lists, and related materials. Major subjects include faculty spouses, art appreciation, the American Federation of Arts, the Carl Shurz Memorial Foundation for the Development of Cultural Relations Between the United States and Germany, the College Art Association, and the Southern States Art League.

Collection

Arts and Sciences Council records, 1991 - 1999 3.5 Linear Feet — 3000 Items

The Arts and Sciences Council was established at Duke University in July 1991, when the Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences disbanded and reconstituted itself to include some aspects of graduate studies and research initiatives. The Arts and Sciences Council is elected by the Arts and Sciences faculty and serves as this faculty's primary institution for faculty governance. The Council also determines and implements the broad objectives of undergraduate education and considers all matters affecting the academic and residential environments of students, making recommendations and adopting regulations where appropriate. Records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A & S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year. English.

Arts and Sciences Council records include correspondence, reports, minutes, memoranda, questionnaires, and other materials documenting the activities of the A&S Council. The bulk of the materials were generated by the Curriculum Review Committee, circa 1992-1999. In 1992 Dean Richard White appointed the Curriculum Review Committee to evaluate the undergraduate curriculum. The records of the committee document its processes of studying the curriculum as well as its evaluation and recommendations. Surveys concerning the curriculum, which were completed by faculty as well as juniors and seniors are included. Curriculum issues reflected in the records include the Undergraduate Writing Course, requirements for academic majors, the division of the curriculum into six areas of knowledge, and academic advising. Copies of earlier curriculum studies, "Structure and Choice in Liberal Education" (1986) and "A Climate for Liberal Learning" (1980), are included.

The collection also features records created by several other committees, including Academic Affairs, Academic Standards, Financial Aid, Residential Life, and Senior Year.

Collection

Arts Council records, 1950 - 1970 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Formed around 1950, the Duke University Arts Council planned music and art events on Duke's campus, such as concerts and exhibits. It also created a lending library of musical recordings and art reproductions, and it produced a radio program, "Arts Council on the Air." After a period of inactivity, the Arts Council dissolved in 1970. Collection includes correspondence, financial papers, membership information, event announcements, minutes, reports, and other administrative papers. Major subjects include Duke University Woman's College and Woman's College Library, art appreciation, and faculty spouses. Materials range in date from 1950 to 1970; the bulk of the materials date from 1950 to 1959. English.

Collection includes correspondence, financial papers, membership information, event announcements, minutes, reports, and other administrative papers. Major subjects include Duke University Woman's College and Woman's College Library, art appreciation, and faculty spouses. Materials range in date from 1950 to 1970; the bulk of the materials date from 1950 to 1959.

Collection

Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Online
Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.

Collection

Bernard Peach papers, [1946 - 1992] 9 Linear Feet — 9000 Items

William Bernard Peach, emeritus professor, joined the Duke University Philosophy Department in 1951. Major subjects of the collection include student papers on philosophy; department business; and notes on Hegel, Descartes, Clarence I. Lewis, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The collection contains correspondence, recommendations, student papers, departmental minutes, lecture notes, and grant proposals. English.

Major subjects include student papers on philosophy; department business; and notes on Hegel, Descartes, Clarence I. Lewis, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. The collection contains correspondence, student papers, departmental minutes, lecture notes, research notes, and grant proposals.

Collection

Bert Cunningham papers, 1927-1943 2.2 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Bert Cunningham was a professor of Biology and Zoology at Trinity College and Duke University from 1916-1943. His collection includes the manuscript and illustrations for his book Introduction to Biology for the College Students, as well as professional correspondence.

Collection contains correspondence relating to the Duke Department of Zoology, the N.C. Academy of Science, and the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. Also includes a final revised typescript copy of Cunningham's Introduction to Biology for the College Students as well as correspondence relating to the possible publication of this book.

Collection
The Biographical Reference Collection contains files of clippings, publications, biographical sketches, curriculum vitae, and other materials about the activities of Duke University administration, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as other people connected or associated with the University, including members of the Duke family. These files were compiled from a variety of sources by University Archives staff for use in reference and research. English.
Collection
The Duke University Board of Trustees has existed since 1924, and grew out of the Trinity College Board of Trustees that existed from 1859 to 1924. The Board is responsible for making major steering decisions in the administration of the school. The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. English.

The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. The minute book covering June 1901-June 1910 was destroyed by fire in 1911, but some handwritten minutes for the period were preserved and have been typed out. There are gaps in the minutes for the period 1925-1930.

The collection is divided into three main sections: Trinity College, Duke University, and Duke University Unprocessed Materials. The Trinity College series begins in 1860 and ends in 1924, the year Trinity College became Duke University. There are minute books, topical files, and yearly files. Because a fire destroyed the minute book covering June 1901-June 1910, some handwritten minutes have been transcribed; these can be found in the yearly files.

The second series, Duke University, covers 1924 to the present. It includes minutes of the Board and the Executive Committee, general records of the Board and the Executive Committee, reports, financial records, committees, and unprocessed materials. All materials less than 50 years old are closed except by special permission, in writing, from the Board of Trustees.

The third series, Duke University Unprocessed Materials, consists primarily of materials less than fifty years old, and so are restricted except by permission from the Board of Trustees.

Collection
The Duke University Board of Trustees is the administrative decision-making body that oversees the planning and direction of the University. The Board of Trustees Reference Collection is mainly comprised of clippings and lists of Board members. English.

The Board of Trustees Reference Collection is mainly comprised of clippings and lists of Board members. The first series, Duke University, features clippings on a number of Duke events and issues that affected the Board. The second series, Board of Trustees, contains lists of members, press reports, citations, and the "Trustee Manual."

Collection
Calla Raynor began her career at Duke in the Physical Education department in 1962 and served as the women’s varsity tennis coach from 1967 to 1973. Raynor was instrumental in co-founding Duke University's women's basketball program. This collection contains correspondence, teaching materials, materials related to Ms. Raynor’s education at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (now UNC-Greensboro), UNC-Chapel Hill, and Duke University. The collection also includes sporting event materials, student athlete records, tournament materials, newspaper clippings, audiovisual materials, collegiate sports institutions and organizations for women, and other records from Raynor’s career at Duke.

This collection contains correspondence, teaching materials, materials related to Ms. Raynor’s undergraduate coursework at the Woman’s College of the University of North Carolina (now UNC-Greensboro) and graduate coursework at UNC-Chapel Hill, sporting event materials, student athlete records, tournament materials, newspaper clippings, photographs, and other records. Materials are related to Duke University’s sports program, as well as materials from other universities and colleges. The collection includes articles and publications related to physical education instruction, primarily from outside sources. Although Raynor's teaching files are included, such as quizzes and exams, most of the published articles were authored by individuals outside of Duke University.

Sports association materials include materials from the early 1970s to the early 1980s -- these materials include records from the Division of Girls’ and Women’s Sports (DGWS), which became the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women in 1971.

Collection

Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

Online
Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.

Collection
The Campus Club was founded in 1914 as a way for the wives of Duke faculty members to create a social community and to support the University through educational events. The collection contains documentation of Campus Club events, business meetings, and financial transactions, as well as scrapbooks, correspondence, clippings, and publications. The collection materials range in date from 1914 to ongoing.

This collection contains a variety of materials pertaining to the history of the Campus Club. Primary contents include notebooks kept by executive board members, scrapbooks created by various committees, and records documenting the work of numerous groups within the Club. Addtional types of documentation contained within the collection are promotional materials, oral histories, publicity clippings, and membership records.

Collection
The Chanticleer is Duke's annual student-produced yearbook. Focus is placed on high- quality photographs. The collection includes photographs, slides, negatives and contact sheets. Duplicates exist throughout the collection. The Collection also includes editing notes from Chanticleer staff. Most of the photographs are in black and white, although there are some in color. They range in date from circa 1998-ongoing.

The Chanticleer Photograph Collection includes photographs, slides, negatives and contact sheets. Duplicates exist throughout the collection. The collection also includes editing notes from Chanticleer staff. Most of the photographs are in black and white, although there are some in color, and the majority of them are unidentified. They range in date from circa 1990s-ongoing.

Collection

Charles A. Baylis papers, 1924-1973 4.5 Linear Feet — 3600 Items

Charles A. Baylis was a professor of philosophy at Duke University from 1952-1970. This collection contains the correspondence, writings, personal papers, and departmental records. The material ranges in date from 1924-1973, bulk from 1950-1970.

This collection is organized into two series, correspondence and personal papers, and covers the years from 1924 to 1973. The bulk of the material is personal correspondence between Baylis and colleagues at other universities. Other material includes papers relating to groups and organizations that Baylis belonged to, course exams and syllabi, and essays he wrote. Notable in this collection is Baylis' Masters Thesis (1924) and a tenure case involving a colleague at the University of Washington (1948).

Collection

Charles A. Ellwood papers, 1889-1946 6.5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes

Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) established the Department of Sociology at Duke University in 1930, retiring in 1944. The papers feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at Missouri and Duke. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

The papers of sociologist Charles A. Ellwood feature incoming and outgoing correspondence, chiefly professional but with some personal exchanges; minutes and other records of Pi Gamma Mu; book and article manuscripts; speeches; news clippings and book reviews; and some photographs. There are some papers related to his teaching career, chiefly related to summer school appointments and his positions at University of Missouri--Columbia and Duke University. A microfilm copy of a scrapbook (circa 1900-1946) contains clippings from Ellwood's career. Professional topics in the papers cover discussion and criticism of Ellwood's books, articles, and views; international and U.S. sociology organizations; the sociology departments at the University of Missouri and Duke University; social ethics; criminology; the social function of religion; and the scientific and statistical approach to sociology. Issues in Ellwood's papers related to crises of the time include race relations; political systems and beliefs; Fascism; persecution of Jews in Europe; U.S. involvement in World War II; religion and ethics; militarism and pacifism; and compulsory conscription.

Collection
Charles L.B. Lowndes was a professor at Duke Law School while Richard Nixon was a student in the 1930s. The collection consists of three letters sent to and from Richard Nixon regarding a 1954 controversy over the possible awarding of an honorary degree to Nixon.

The collection consists of three letters: a copy of a letter from Charles L. B. Lowndes to then-Vice President Richard Nixon, Richard Nixon's original signed reply to Charles Lowndes, and a copy of RIchard Nixon's letter to then-President of Duke University Hollis Edens, all dated 1954.

Collection

Charles Roy Hauser papers, 1924-1969 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Charles R. Hauser was a 40 year faculty member at Duke University. He came to Duke as an instructor in Chemistry in 1929. He was appointed to full professor in 1946 and was named a James B. Duke professor of chemistry in 1961. Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Materials in the collection date from 1924 to 1969.

Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Collection also contains a few personal items including his transcript from the University of Florida-Gainesville, the final examination program for his Ph.D., commemorative certificate for the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, and a letter offering the position of Instructorship in Chemistry at Duke University.

Collection

Clement Vollmer papers, 1898-1983 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Clement Vollmer joined the German Languages and Literature Department at Duke University in 1926, where he remained until his retirement in 1956. In 1918, he published The American Novel in Germany. Professor Vollmer served as chair of the department during the 1950s, as president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, and was a member of numerous academic societies. Includes correspondence, recommendations, faculty meeting minutes, German Department memoranda, grade books and department enrollment statistics. Also includes date books, address books and diaries kept by Maude Hugo Vollmer (Mrs. Clement Vollmer). Inclusive years are 1898-1983.

Contains materials related to Vollmer's career in the German Department at Duke, including correspondence, recommendations, minutes, memoranda, grade books, department enrollment, faculty appointments and wartime activities. Also includes correspondence relating to University Church services, the Academic Council and the Vigil. The rest of the collection includes address/date books and diaries (including travel diaries) kept primarily by Maude Hugo Vollmer, wife of Clement Vollmer. Also includes a list of houses (with architect names) in the Duke Forest, a New Testament, a University of Southern California handbook, a wallet full of expired oil company credit cards. Original brittle folders were replaced for preservation. Inclusive dates are 1898-1983.

Collection
Daniel A. Livingstone is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of Biology at Duke University, with longstanding research interests in biology, limnology, paleolimnology, zoology, and other subjects. The Daniel A. Livingstone papers include the extensive correspondence of Dr. Livingstone from the 1980s to 2001 as well as other materials related to his research and teaching at Duke University.

The Daniel A. Livinstone papers consist primarily of the extensive correspondence of Daniel Livingstone with scientists and colleagues related to his research interests in biology, limnology, paleolimnology, and other subjects. Other materials are related to his work on a variety of research grants, classes taught at Duke University, and other topics.

This collection has not yet been processed.

Collection

Department of Computer Science records, 1961-1978 1.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

The Department of Computer Science originally formed as the Computer Science Program in 1971. It became a department in 1973. The files in this collection concern the origin and formation of the Department and include much information about the Duke University Computation Center (DUCC) and the Triangle Universities Computation Center (TUCC). Materials range in date from 1961-1978.

Contains materials regarding the origin and formation of the Department of Computer Science and includes reports, budgetary information, faculty biosketches, memos, minutes and miscellaneous items. Dates range from 1961-1978.

Collection
The Dept. of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (HPER) was created in 1975 by the merger of the Men's and Women's Physical Education Departments. However, formal physical education at Duke University dates back to 1902 when President Kilgo invited Wilbur "Cap" Card to return to Trinity College as Director of a new program in physical education. The collection is divided into two series: General files and the John Friedrich papers series. The General files contain printed material on intramural athletics, personal recreational programs, and physical education. The John Friedrich papers series contains administrative records pertaining to his chairmanship of HPER from 1963-1986, and ranges in date from 1975-1986.

The General files series in the Dept. of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (HPER) collection contains materials pertaining to the origins and activities of HPER including material on intramural athletics, personal recreational programs, and physical education. Present in the collection are: flyers, intramural handbooks, clippings, manual for the Men's Physical Education program of 1932, and issues of the Faculty Fitness Newsletter. The John Friedrich papers series contains administrative records pertaining to his chairmanship of HPER from 1963-1986, and ranges in date from 1975-1986. Materials present include correspondence, minutes and agendas from several University committees including Academic Council, Commencement Committee, and Undergraduate Faculty Council of Arts and Sciences (UFCAS), as well as minutes from HPER departmental meetings. Friedrich presided over the HPER restructuring debates of the 1970s and early 1980s and reports, proposals, and clippings regarding retrenchment of the Dept. are present in this series.

Collection

Dept. of Music sound recordings, 1956 - 1990 51 Linear Feet — 680 Items

In 1942, Duke University created the Department of Aesthetics, Art and Music. In 1960, the Department of Music formed as a separate department. Allan H. Bone, Duke professor from 1940 to 1983 and conductor of the Duke Symphony, was instrumental in the formation of the department. British composer Iain Hamilton was a faculty member for seventeen years. The Dept. of Music Sound Recordings collection contains audiotapes made between 1956 and 1990, primarily on 1/4 inch reel to reel tape, of the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, the Duke Glee Club, the Ciompi Quartet, and the Duke Collegium Musicum, as well as other recordings related to the faculty and students of the Duke University Department of Music. There are also audiocassettes and a few videotapes. Faculty members represented include Jane Hawkins, Penelope Jensen, Randall Love, Robert Parkins, Fred Raimi, Claudia Warburg, and Ruth Friedburg. Other featured musicians are Milton Babbitt, Barbara Lister-Sink, Claudia Bloom, Boaz Sharon, and Bruce Berg. English.

The Dept. of Music Sound Recordings collection contains audiotapes made between 1956 and 1990, primarily on 1/4 inch reel to reel tape, of the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, the Duke Glee Club, the Ciompi Quartet, and the Duke Collegium Musicum, as well as other recordings related to the faculty and students of the Duke University Department of Music. There are also audiocassettes and a few videotapes. Faculty members represented include Jane Hawkins, Penelope Jensen, Randall Love, Robert Parkins, Fred Raimi, Claudia Warburg, and Ruth Friedburg. Other featured musicians are Milton Babbitt, Barbara Lister-Sink, Claudia Bloom, Boaz Sharon, and Bruce Berg.

Collection
Courses in Russian language and literature were offered at Duke University in the early 1950s. The Russian Department was formed in 1958, renamed Slavic Languages and Literatures in 1967, and renamed again in the 2006-2007 academic year to Slavic and Eurasian Studies. Collection contains largely the files of Magnus Jan Krynski, chairman of the department from ca. 1966-1988, along with the records of other faculty members. The material dates from 1956-1983.

Collection contains largely the files of Magnus Jan Krynski, chairman of the department from ca. 1966-1988, along with the records of other faculty members. Materials present include correspondence with students, job applicants, and faculty at other institutions, departmental budgets, vitae, printed matter, reports, and other materials pertaining to the teaching of Slavic languages and literatures, including courses in technical Russian for scientists and engineers, and professional activities of the faculty. The material dates from 1956-1983.

Collection

Dept. of Sociology records, 1953-1990 0.5 Linear Feet — 750 Items

The Dept. of Sociology at Duke was established in 1930 by Charles Abram Ellwood (1873-1946) and remains an active department to this day offering degrees to both undergraduates and graduate students. This collection contains student research papers, course syllabi, memoranda, newspaper clippings, documentation from the Sociology Majors Union, as well as other various departmental documents.

This collection contains student research papers, course syllabi, memoranda, newspaper clippings, documentation from the Sociology Majors Union, as well as other various departmental documents.

Collection

Don Roy papers, 1921 - 1980 25.5 Linear Feet

Donald Francis Roy (1909-1980), noted industrial sociologist, was a faculty member at Duke University in the Department of Sociology from 1950 until his retirement in 1979. Roy's areas of specialization were field methods of sociological research and social conflict. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees. English.

The collection includes correspondence, clippings, articles, reviews, manuscripts, research and field notes, reprints, newsletters, photographs, teaching materials, pamphlets, and other written materials. The major subjects of the collection are Roy's study of industrial sociology; workplace interactions; and specific collective bargaining and union campaigns of the Textile Workers Union of America, the Teamsters Union, and the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

While at Duke, Roy studied the attempts made by the Textile Workers Union of America to have union contracts accepted in some of the mills of Virginia and North Carolina. Between 1956-1959 and 1973-1979, Roy made detailed observations on the campaigns at the Hanes Knitting Company in Winston-Salem, N.C., 1956-1957; Elkin, N.C., 1956-1957; Chatham, Va., 1956; Burlington, N.C., 1957; Roanoke, Va., 1956 and 1965; Radford, Va., 1957; Vinton, Va., 1957; Dublin, Va., 1957; Altavista, Va., 1957; Henderson, N.C., 1958-1959; Roanoke Rapids, N.C., 1964-1979; Wallace, N.C., 1974 and 1977; Laurinburg, N.C., 1977-1979. The bulk of the information about these campaigns can be found in Boxes 1-5 and Boxes 14-19. Manuscripts on the Sheffield and Tyndall campaigns can be found in Box 1.

In addition, Roy followed the disputes involving the Teamsters Union in Atlanta, Ga., 1966, and the attempt by Local 77 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees to establish a union at Duke Hospital in the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout his life, Roy took detailed field notes, collected materials, and retained correspondence about his industrial studies. These materials are scattered throughout the collection.

In 1965-1966, Roy spent a year on sabbatical at Cornell University. During that year, Roy wrote case studies on the Tyndall Garment Co., the Sheffield and Laurel Campaigns, the Burlington Campaign, the Corinth Study, and the Labor Organizing Campaign. Roy's field notes and observations are included in the collection.

Roy used pseudonyms, to protect confidentiality, for the names of the people and places he studied. Box 14 contains a list of the pseudonyms Roy used in his case studies. The following list gives the actual name followed by the pseudonym used by Roy in some of his studies and in his folder titles.

Missing Title
Hanes Knitting
Tyndall Garments
Winston-Salem, N.C.
Lancaster
Elkin, N.C.
Laurel
Chatham, Va.
Sheffield
Burlington, N.C.
Jefferson
Roanoke, Va.
Statesboro
Radford, Va.
Zebulon
Vinton, Va.
Corinth
Dublin, Va.
Indian Hills
Altavista, Va.
Cartersville
Roanoke Rapids, N.C.
Clearwater

Box 6 contains files for a book begun by Roy about his interest and involvement in union organizing. The book was not completed. The collection file contains Mrs. Roy's outline of the book's organization.

The collection file includes a paper by Huw Beynon with notes and comments about Roy's papers. Beynon's manuscript offers a proposed classification for the collection and outlines themes of Roy's work. The collection file also includes a biographical sketch by Dr. Joy K. Roy, Roy's second wife.

Collection

Dorothy E. Roberts papers, 1903-1993 2.5 Linear Feet — approx. 2000 Items

Dorothy Roberts worked in the Dept. of English's administration office from 1948 until her retirement in the late 1980's-early 1990's. The collection includes correspondence, clippings, photographs, printed material and other items created and collected by Dorothy Roberts about the Dept. of English at Duke University. Files largely pertain to the history of the department, focusing heavily on departmental faculty. The collection ranges in date from 1903-1993.

The collection largely consists of material compiled by Roberts, who functioned as historian of the Dept. of English. Of note are the various lists of faculty, Ph.D. candidates and staff of the department over a number of years. Also included are files she maintained on faculty members, which include correspondence and clippings as well as a file Roberts kept on herself regarding her career at Duke. She also provides her impressions of key departmental staff, namely the chairmen she worked for. In 1982, Roberts donated 14 letters between her and Guy Davenport, a Duke alumnus, regarding Paris and other European cities as well of Davenport's appreciation of James Joyce and Roberts' own love of traveling abroad. Roberts' friendship with Reynolds Price is represented in the collection. There are several folders on him which include correspondence, Christmas cards, photographs, clippings, and an envelope which holds locks of Price's hair. Of particular note is a sketch Price drew of Emily Dickinson that he gave to Roberts. There is also a caricature of Ph.D. candidates, including Price, from 1962.

Collection

Douglas Greenwood Hill papers, 1947-1961 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Douglas Hill was a Professor of Chemistry at Duke University from 1931-1968. His specialty was high temperature and solid-state chemistry. The collection includes correspondence, technical papers, reprints and other materials and ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated material.

The collection includes typescripts of scientific papers, related correspondence and graphs. It ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated materials.

Collection
Duke Photography, formerly called Duke University Photography, was the official photographic service of Duke University. The Duke Photography Records include many of the original photographs taken by the service from the 1960s through the 2010s.

The collection includes many of the photographs taken by Duke Photography in the course of its work as the official photographic service of Duke University. Photographs include images of administrators, students, faculty, staff, visiting speakers, artists, and celebrities, campus and classroom scenes, athletic events, buildings and construction on campus, theatrical and other performances, members of the Board of Trustees, parties and events, and many other subjects.

Photographs include both analog and digital formats; the majority of the analog photographs are on 35mm film, although other photographic mediums are present. Most jobs include all or most of the original images and may or may not indicate which images were selected for use.

The description for images included in this finding aid was provided by Duke Photography in the course of their record-keeping and is incomplete. Broad subject categories divised by Duke Photography were often applied to jobs, but this categorization was not always applied or consistent. The vast majority of job numbers have some description indicating the topic, event, or individuals featured, but does not include identification of every individual, event, or date. Some job numbers do not have any description provided.

Collection
This collection consists of original and copy negatives taken by various sources over several decades. Most of the negatives were produced by the Office of News and Communication's News Bureau in the early years of Duke University and later by University Photography (upon its establishment).

Contains negatives and some matching prints of University-related subjects, including people (i.e. faculty, trustees, students, etc.), buildings, construction, schools and departments. While dates range from 1855-1995, it is necessary to note that the majority of the negatives are copy negatives, rather than originals. While a good number of original negatives are included in this collection, the user should be aware that some of the corresponding dates refer to when the copy negative was made, not when the original picture was taken. In most cases, it is noted on the negative sleeve if the negative is a copy or an original. Furthermore, users should be aware that some negatives are of published material. For instance, several pages from the Chanticleer and the Chronicle were photographed and the negatives were kept. On some of the sleeves, users will find notes presumably made by the photographer regarding print quality.

An attempt was made to bring a cohesiveness to the negative collection for easier patron and staff access. The negatives are arranged in the following series: Subject Negatives, General Negatives, Building Negatives, Construction Negatives, Faculty Negatives, Medical Center Negatives, and Numbered Negatives. The Numbered Negatives are copy negatives pulled from the larger University Archives Photograph Collection. Any future additions to the negative collection will follow the numbering format.

Collection

Edgar Tristram Thompson papers, 1915 - 1985 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Edgar Tristram Thompson taught Sociology at Duke University from 1937 until his retirement in 1970. The papers include correspondence with Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen; teaching materials from undergraduate and graduate courses in race relations, religion, and social anthropology; lecture notes from Thompson's mentor and sociology instructor Robert E. Park; research on plantations in Hawaii and in Africa as the Hugh le May Fellow at Rhodes University; development and operations of a Black Studies program and Center for Southern Studies at Duke University; short papers discussing race relations at Duke University and racial identity; autobiographical histories of Thompson's students; manuscripts for many books on race relations; records of participation in Alpha Kappa Delta and American Sociological Association conferences; a campus-wide graffiti survey; and addresses to the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham. English.

The material in this collection addresses American race relations and scholarly treatment of race from about 1940 to 1970. The bulk of the records date from 1920 to 1970. Included are manuscripts of papers by Thompson, his thesis, a bound volume of selected writings, personal and professional correspondence, printed matter, research notes, proofs, departmental budgets and other materials relating to the study and teaching of sociology. Primary sources include handwritten autobiographical histories written by African American students and surveys from a nationwide graffiti project. Major subjects in the manuscripts include race relations in the United States and in other countries, the South, religion in the South, international plantation systems, and sociological anthropology. There is also a small amount of material on the sociology of language. Also included are histories of the Department of Sociology, articles presented in symposia and conferences by Thompson, correspondence concerning the development, establishment, and operations of the Duke Center for Southern Studies (1965 to 1969) and the formation of a Black Studies program (1969). There are also papers from the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham from 1945. Other materials include newspaper articles which address problems and violence in race relations and publicity of race relations events at Duke.

In addition to scholarly topics in sociology, this collection introduces perspectives on race relations at Duke University during the politically active 1960s and 1970s. There are a number of articles about Duke-sponsored race relations learning activities. Thompson was a strong advocate of learning about personal racial heritage and understanding social structures and events though that frame. He tried for many years, without success, to gain the Ford Foundation's sponsorship of race relations conferences and seminars; this topic received much attention from scholars in sociology. Correspondents include contemporary sociologists Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen. Thompson's greatest influence was Robert E. Park, a former instructor who was also an expert on race relations theory and plantation systems.

The Edgar T. Thompson papers were originally unorganized. Folders contained many types of documents covering a variety of topics and were loosely grouped by date according to year of accession of the material. The folders have since been further grouped into several series, and further by date within each series, where applicable. Many items in this collection are undated. A list of Thompson's writing can be found at the front of the bound volume The Papers of Dr. Edgar T. Thompson.

Collection

Elbert Russell papers, 1893 - 1968 1.3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Elbert Russell served as a Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 until 1941. Personal and professional papers contain correspondence, manuscript materials, sermons, articles and short writings, and clippings. Major subjects include Duke University Divinity School, study and teaching of the Bible, history of Quakerism, study and teaching of Quakerism, fellowship, study and teaching of pacifism, and sermons. Materials range in date from 1893-1968. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional work of Elbert Russell, Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 to 1941. In addition to his sermons, articles and books, Russell authored many poems and a play. Much of the correspondence in the collection includes references to pacifism and concerns sermons, teaching, preaching, Quakerism, and formal publication of his writings. Some clippings and correspondence in the collection date from after Russell's death and discuss his life and work. These most likely were collected by colleagues or family members. Materials range in date from 1893-1968.

Collection

Ellwood S. Harrar papers, 1928 - 1975 2 Linear Feet — 2000 Items

Ellwood S. Harrar served as a Professor of Wood Technology at Duke University from 1936 to 1974, and as Dean of the Duke University School of Forestry from 1957 to 1967. He researched and published extensively on forestry and dendrology. The Ellwood S. Harrar Papers contain documents related to his interests in the lumber industry and wood production. As a Dean, he participated in the planning for the new Biological Sciences Building and frequently corresponded with contractors and vendors regarding its construction. The materials in the collection are primarily correspondence, but it also includes academic papers, biographical sketches, and photographs, among other materials. Major subjects include the U.S. wood industry, wood technology, and forest research. Major correspondents include the Navy Bureau of Ships, Swift and Company, J.P. Perry, J. George Harrar, and the Brunswick Pulp Research Fund. English.

Collection includes correspondence, papers, photographs, and other documents related to Ellwood S. Harrar's career as a professor of forestry and Dean of the School of Forestry at Duke University. It is organized into the following series: Series 1, Personal, 1928-1975; Series 2, Duke University, 1951-1974; and Series 3, Correspondence, 1946-1974.

Collection

Ernestine Friedl papers, circa 1950 - 2000 22.5 Linear Feet — 15000 Items

Ernestine Friedl served as chair of the Dept. of Anthropology and as Dean of Arts and Sciences and Trinity College at Duke University. She studied gender roles, rural life in modern Greece, and the Chippewa. The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University. English.

The Ernestine Friedl papers include personal and professional correspondence, subject files, course materials, articles, reprints, field notes, and sound recordings related to her anthropological research and her roles as professor and administrator at Queens College and Duke University.

Collection
Ernest William Nelson (1896-1974) was a professor of history at Duke University (1926-1965). His primary interest was Italian Renaissance cultural history. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society (1945) and was chairman from 1945-1963. Major subjects include the Duke University Dept. of History, the Chamber Arts Society, and cultural life on campus. The collection contains correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material. English.

The Ernest W. Nelson Records and Papers is divided into three series: Subject Files, the Chamber Arts Society, and Personal and Family Materials. The collection includes correspondence, financial records, lectures, reports, student papers, and other printed material.

The Subject Files Series, 1926-1973, is mainly concerned with the internal functioning of the university, the history department, cultural life on campus, and faculty organizations. A number of student folders are filed in this section, under "History Dept.: Students." Nelson selected these particular folders to give examples of his grading system, to show some of his students' work, and to cover the span of Nelson's years at Duke. The folders of those students who achieved prominence are also included in this section.

The Chamber Arts Society Series, 1945-1975, contains financial records, membership lists, programs, and correspondence. Nelson founded the Durham Chamber Arts Society in 1945 to offer members of the Durham and Duke communities an opportunity to further their appreciation of the fine arts. The Chamber Arts Society began by presenting chamber music concerts in the East Duke Music Room at Duke University. Nelson was chairman of the Chamber Arts Society until 1963.

Most of the Personal and Family Materials Series, 1913-1966, is made up of correspondence and concerns family matters, health problems, and descriptions of short excursions such as bicycle outings and shopping trips.

Some of the correspondence includes information about current world events. In letters to Nelson, economics professor Calvin Bryce Hoover described life in the Soviet Union in 1929, and the upcoming German elections in 1932. In 1939, Shelby McCloy described the reaction in France to the outbreak of World War II and faculty members' assignments during the war. In 1943, several Duke faculty members described the effects of the war on Duke University. Professor William B. Hamilton wrote about how teaching loads had greatly increased due to the large number of V-12 naval and marine cadets who were sent to Duke. Alan K. Manchester described the Navy syllabus used to teach World History and how the war changed civilian life. Several letters from William T. Laprade discussed the impact of the war on the history department and the effect of the draft on faculty.

Nelson carried on lengthy correspondence with some of his students, many of whom either went abroad or entered graduate schools, and with a number of scholars at other institutions. Among these scholars are Carl Becker, Roland Bainton, Preserved Smith, George Lincoln Burr, Theodore Mommsen, and Hans Baron.

A folder list is available as part of the collection file. Please consult University Archives staff.

Box 1 and Box 6 are closed pending processing.

Access to the folders containing student records is RESTRICTED. Please consult University Archives staff before use.

Collection

Eugenia Saville papers, circa 1950-1977 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Eugenia Seville joined the faculty of the Duke University Music Department in 1947 as an instructor, and was eventually promoted to Assistant and Associate Professor in 1950 and 1960, respectively. She specialized in Italian sacred music, and directed the Duke Madrigal Singers from 1947 to 1972. She died in 2006. Contains course materials, music facsimiles, performance scores, materials related to the Duke Madrigal Singers, personal correspondence, and ephemera accumulated during Saville's research trips in the U.S. and Europe.

Contains materials from Saville's various courses taught at Duke. Also includes facsimiles of musical manuscripts, and vocal parts for music used as class examples and as part of the Madrigal Singers' performance repertoire. Collection also contains a wooden box of lantern slides and negatives, primarily of scenes from historical opera performances and opera houses. Removed rubber-bands, 1 folder of receipts and photocopy requests, 1 folder of student employment records, 1 folder of salary information and peripheral "to do" lists.

Collection

Explorers' Club records, 1919-2000 1.2 Linear Feet — 100 Items

The Explorers' Club was formed as an informal walking club for Duke students and faculty in 1930. The collection includes photographs of club expeditions, memorabilia and correspondence, mostly from the years 1932 to 1971.

Includes "Recollections of the Explorers' Club," recorded in April 1971 by Ernest Seeman and "The Explorers' Club" by Exie Duncan. The photograph album contains pictures of club and earlier expeditions from 1919 to 1934. Also includes memorabilia, correspondence, "The Explorer: A Semi-Scholarly Yellow Sheet Devoted to the Pursuit of Epedaphics, Wiener-Schnitzels and Camaraderie; And Being a Circulatory Circumbendibus of the Explores' Club", and the Spring 2000 issue of the Eno River Association's newsletter.

Collection
Contains Census Reports by faculty and other instructional staff at Duke University. Reports were administered the the Office of the Provost and Deans of schools and include information about courses, instructors and students. Types of materials include individual reports and bound volumes. Major subjects include Duke University administration, course statistics, and activities of Duke University faculty. Materials range in date from 1933 to 1987. English.

Contains census reports of faculty and other instructional staff of the College of Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Forestry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, and the Graduate School at Duke University. Reports were administered by the Office of the Provost and Deans of schools. Reports include days, dates, and locations of class meetings, credit hours, instructor name and rank, course title and subject matter, department, number of male and female students, and grade level of students. Materials are arranged in chronological order by semester, then alphabetical order by department, program, and faculty members. Contains both foldered files and bound volumes.

Collection
The Faculty Club of Duke University is a non-stock corporation chartered by the State of North Carolina in 1933. The purpose of the club was to foster good fellowship among members; to contribute to their social life; and to promote discussion of scholarly matters as well as matters of general interest. This collection contains reports, correspondence, minutes, memoranda, agendas, programs, lists, questionnaires, charter and bylaws, and newspaper clippings. Major subjects include Duke University faculty, faculty societies, and the Duke University Faculty Club. Materials range in date from 1918-1976. English.

Records were created by members and officers of the Faculty Club of Trinity College (and Duke University) between 1918 and 1976. The records consist of one box of foldered materials and one volume of Faculty Club records (1918 to 1933), which includes minutes of the Board of Governors. The collection primarily contains reports, correspondence, and minutes. It also consists of memoranda, agendas, programs, lists, questionnaires, the organization's charter and bylaws, and newspaper clippings.

Collection

Faculty records, 1911-1986 4.5 Linear Feet — about 4,000 Items

The responsibilities of faculty members, in addition to planning classes and providing instruction, included enacting regulations necessary to carry out instruction, advance the standards of work, and develop the scholarly aims of the school. The Faculty also recommended degree candidates and persons worthy of receiving academic distinction to the trustees. The records document administrative and academic concerns of university faculty members and officers from 1911-1986. They consist of bound volumes of minutes, reports, memoranda, agendas, and correspondence. The records also include a few invitations, proposals, announcements, newsletters, and newspaper clippings.

Members of various faculty councils, committees, and governing bodies of Trinity College and Duke University created these records between 1911 and 1986. The records document administrative and academic concerns of university faculty members and officers during this period of time. The records consist of bound volumes of minutes of the General Faculty (also referred to as the Faculty and later renamed the University Faculty), General Faculty Council, and the Council on Undergraduate Teaching (also called the Council on Undergraduate Instruction), along with folders of other material. The bulk consists of minutes, reports, memoranda, agendas, and correspondence.

These records reflect the actions of the following university bodies: the Commission on Faculty Reorganization, the Council on Undergraduate Teaching, the (General) Faculty Council, Faculty Meetings, the Faculty Organizational Committee, the Faculty Standing Committee on the Curricula, and University Faculty Minutes. These records contain the same types of documents as those found in the bound volumes; however, they also contain a few invitations, proposals, announcements, newsletters, and newspaper clippings.

Collection

Correspondence, memoranda, reports, registers, handbooks, newsletters, flyers, news clippings, and other printed and manuscript material concerning the activities of faculty, services for active and emeriti faculty, relations between the faculty and students and the faculty and the administration, salaries, and other matters. The bulk dates of the material are 1960-1990. The materials include a list of women faculty (1936-1952), and copies of faculty newsletters and faculty handbooks. Cataloged copies of the handbooks and newsletters are available.

Collection

Frances D. Acomb papers, 1953 - 1975 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Frances D. Acomb (1907-1984) served as a professor of history at Duke University from 1945 to 1975. She specialized in French history. The Acomb papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan; as well as the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors, the American Association of University Women, and other professional organizations. English.

The papers contain correspondence, memoranda, manuscripts, and printed matter dealing with Acomb's study of modern European history, particularly Jacques Mallet Du Pan. Acomb's memberships in the Duke University chapter of the American Association of University Professors and the American Association of University Women are documented through minutes and other materials.

Collection

Frank Allan Hanna papers, 1850-1936 2.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Frank Allan Hanna was a professor of economics at Duke University from 1948-1972. The collection contains largely bound materials from the Wisconsin State Income Tax Study Hanna worked on but it also includes Hanna family genealogy and ledger books for "Negro Accounts" from the antebellum period and galley proofs for one of Hanna's publications. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

This collection contains the work of the Wisconsin Income Tax Commission and its studies between 1929 and 1936. A master tabulating procedures manual is included. Two daybooks from South Carolina, 1850-1855, contain accounts of a store which kept special accounts for African-Americans. The volumes on the genealogy of the Hanna family are to be kept with the papers at the request of Professor Hanna. A set of galley proofs for Institutional Economics by John R. Commons has corrections by Professor Hanna. The collection ranges in date from 1850-1936.

Collection
Frank Clyde Brown (1870-1943) served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University, and as Comptroller and University Marshall of Duke University. He oversaw the initial construction of Duke University's West Campus and the renovation of East Campus. Brown also founded the North Carolina Folklore Society. The Frank C. Brown Papers contain correspondence, logs, diaries, reports, lantern slides, notebooks, clippings, a scrapbook, and other materials. While some papers relate to teaching and English department activities, the bulk of the collection concerns the construction of Duke University, including correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, builder and manufacturer information, construction progress reports, travel diaries of visits to other campuses, and records of James B. Duke's views on architecture and involvement in campus planning. English.

The Frank C. Brown Papers include both Personal papers and Subject files relating to his career as a student, professor, and folklorist and also to his role in the construction of the Duke University campuses. The Personal papers series includes correspondence, biographical information, writings, addresses, lectures, clippings, diaries, coursework, blueprints, and slides. It includes correspondence with the Horace Trumbauer architectural firm, manufacturers' literature, construction progress reports, diaries of trips made in 1924 and 1926 to look at other campuses, and a lantern slide presentation on the campus. This series contains records documenting James B. Duke's views on architecture and his involvement in the planning of the campus. Also present is a diary/scrapbook kept by Brown and President William Preston Few during a 1924 tour during which they visited some twenty colleges and universities around the Eastern United States.

The Subject files series contains the alphabetical office files of Frank C. Brown. The bulk of the files pertain to the construction of the Duke University campuses and include information on planning, design, building materials, furnishings, builders, manufacturers, and vendors. A few items interfiled in the Subject files series relate to Brown's activities as a faculty member and as a member of professional and academic organizations.