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Collection
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The Working Groups in Feminism and History (WGFH, formerly the Feminist Women in History Group, FWHG) is a collective of graudate students and faculty from Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other area universities that meets regularly to discuss scholarship in gender and history. The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History.

The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History. Included are captures of both the Feminist Women in History website from 2003 and the Working Group in Feminism and History site as of 2017; fliers for events organized by the group; correspondence regarding event planning, scheduling speakers, leadership of the group, and other topics; a printed out copy of the website for the Feminist Women in History Group; and schedules for events.

Collection

Robert H. Woody papers, 1927-1985. 6 Linear Feet — 6,000 Items

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a professor of history at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Types of materials include correspondence, manuscripts, short writings, vitae, certificates, diplomas, committee reports, printed material, photographs, 8 mm films, and VHS tapes. Major subjects include Robert H. Woody, the Civil War, the South, South Carolina, North Carolina, reconstruction, republicans, southern newspapers, biographies, mountain culture, folklore, history instruction, Duke University, the Duke University history department, and the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana. Major correspondents appearing in the collection include: William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, William T. Laprade, Francis Warrenton Dawson, Stanly Godbold, Jr., Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, Stanley Godbold, the Southern Historical Association, and the Historical Society of North Carolina. Some materials are restricted. Materials range in date from 1927 to 1985. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Robert Hilliard Woody, a teacher and historian at Duke University from 1929 to 1970. Materials include correspondence with individuals and professional organizations, films, clippings, and writings (including original Civil War correspondence) pertaining to Woody's research, and manuscript materials for biographies of Civil War statesmen and Duke University President William Preston Few. Major correspondents include colleagues at Duke University: Arthur Hollis Edens, Paul M. Gross, William Preston Few, Francis B. Simkins, William K. Boyd, and William T. Laprade. Correspondence is ordered alphabetically. Films are 8mm format. Some materials are restricted

Collection
Peter H. Wood is Professor Emeritus in the Dept. of History at Duke University. The collection consists of documentation related to the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981.

This collection contains correspondence, flyers, clippings, and other documents regarding the Nixon Library Controversy at Duke during 1981. The documentation was created and/or collected by Dept. of History Professor, Peter H. Wood, and demonstrates the divisiveness of this controversy as well as the opinions of Duke faculty members regarding the Nixon library.

Collection

Frederick A. Wolf papers, 1917 - 1975 0.4 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Frederick A. Wolf (1885-1975) served as Professor of Botany at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1954. His research focused on tobacco agriculture and pathology. The Frederick A. Wolf papers include research notebooks and photographs, a list of his publications, and reprints of Wolf's scholarly articles, all concerning his research in tobacco and leaf diseases and fungi. English.

The Wolf papers include research notebooks and photographs, a list of his publications, and reprints of some of Wolf's publications, all concerning his research in tobacco and leaf diseases and fungi.

Collection

Robert R. Wilson papers, 1921 - 1975 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Robert Renbert Wilson served as a professor of political science at Duke University from 1925 to 1975. He also acted as chair of the Dept. of Political Science (1934-1948), Director of Graduate Studies (1937-1947, 1949-1966), lecturer in the Law School (1948-1966), and chair of the Commonwealth Studies Center (1959-1966) at Duke University, and as an adviser on commercial treaties to the U.S. State Department. The Robert R. Wilson Papers primarily consist of correspondence, but the collection also contains writings, teaching materials, subject files, and photographs. Major subjects include American politics and government, treaties, international law, political theory, and the American Journal of International Law. English.

The Robert R. Wilson papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Writings, Courses, Subject Files, and Photographs. The majority of the collection consists of correspondence dealing with Wilson's speaking engagements, professional associations, books and publications, and students and colleagues in law and political science at Duke and at institutions across the United States. Major correspondents include the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Dept. of State, the American Journal of International Law, the Commonwealth Studies Center, and university presses. Writings include articles, book reviews, addresses, and other pieces written by Wilson about obligatory arbitration, treaties, African American suffrage, international law, public law, international organization, World War II, the British Commonwealth, the United Nations, and U.S. foreign relations. The Courses series includes syllabi, exams, class case studies, and other materials relating to Wilson's classes in American politics and government, and in international law. Subject Files include reports, articles written about Robert R. Wilson, students' evaluations of Wilson's courses, and other materials. Photographs include a group photo of the Intercollegiate Model Disarmament Conference (Bucknell University, Dec. 4-6, 1931); an unidentified, undated group photo; and an unidentified, undated portrait of a female subject.

Collection

George W. Williams papers, 1950-2005 4.1 Linear Feet — 5,000 Items

George Williams taught in the English Department at Duke University. His collection includes lecture materials, correspondence, department and University correspondence, memoranda, and conference memorabilia.

Contains personal correspondence, Graduate School and English Department memoranda, campus committee minutes and correspondence, conference programs and organizational materials, materials relating to Duke's program in Continuing Education for College Faculty.

Removed rubber bands for preservation, discarded 7 folders of student grades and employment records.

Collection
Newman Ivey White was an educator and Percy Bysshe Shelley scholar. He served as Professor of English at Trinity College and Duke University from 1919 to 1948. The papers include correspondence, lectures, research materials, including notecards, copies of letters, manuscripts, and photographs along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. Most of the material reflects his work on Shelley and the English Romantic poets; a small amount of reprints and lectures concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other scholars of the English poets; correspondents include T. J. Wise, Frederick L. Jones, and George L. Kittredge. H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw wrote to congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf regard the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents comment on conditions in Europe during World War II. English.

Correspondence, lectures, research materials, including photostatic copies of letters, manuscripts, and graphics, along with printed matter, miscellaneous writings, and other papers, with bulk dates of 1936-1948. There is little in the collection that relates to Prof. White's early career. Most of the material appears to have been collected in the course of his work on the English Romantic poets; a small amount of material, comprising reprints and lectures, concerns folklore. Much of the correspondence is between White and other students of the English poets; subjects of the letters include differing opinions and disputes over the interpretation of events in Shelley's life. Other correspondents, among them H.L. Mencken and George Bernard Shaw, congratulate White on his publications. Several folders of correspondence with members of the publishing firm of Alfred A. Knopf concern the publication of Shelley in 1940. A letter from Duke faculty member Calvin B. Hoover describes Nazi Germany in 1932, and several of White's European correspondents make comments about conditions in Europe during World War II.

Collection

Henry Weitz papers, 1931 - 1978 16.5 Linear Feet — 16000 Items

Henry Weitz, a psychologist and professor of education, was director of Duke University's Bureau of Testing and Guidance (later the University Counseling Center) from 1950 to 1978. The Henry Weitz Papers include correspondence, reports, minutes, writings, speeches, publications, research and testing materials, course materials, and other documents related to Weitz's career at the University of Delaware and Duke University. Most of the materials are related to Weitz's interest in guidance, vocational, and adjustment counseling for students. English.

The Henry Weitz Papers include correspondence, reports, minutes, writings, speeches, publications, research and testing materials, course materials, and other documents related to Weitz's career at the University of Delaware and Duke University. Most of the materials are related to Weitz's interest in guidance, vocational, and adjustment counseling for students.

Collection

Morris Weisfeld papers, undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 3 Items

Morris Weisfeld was a professor in the Mathematics Department at Duke University. His collection contains three booklets of teaching materials.

Contains three bound booklets of outlines and lessons for courses on Modern Algebra, Elementary Topology and Wave Equations.

Collection

Richard L. Watson, Jr. papers, 1941 - 1989 19 Linear Feet — 14,500 Items

Richard L. Watson, Jr. served as Professor of History at Duke University (1939-1984), Chair of the Department of History (1960-1967), Chair of the Academic Council (1964-1966, 1975-1977), and associate editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly (1974-1987). Papers include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, course evaluations, research files, and manuscript drafts of chapters, and involve Watson's work with the Army Air Force Historical Office, the History Department, Duke University, professional organizations, research and writings in American history and historiography, and personal materials. English.

The materials in this collection consist of the papers of Richard L. Watson, Jr. accrued between 1941 and 1989. The majority of the collection pertains to his work at Duke University, both in the department of history and in service to university faculty and administration. There are also papers relating to his writings and research, his work in the Army Air Force Historical Office, professional organizations, and personal life. Types of materials include correspondence, notes, committee minutes and reports, teacher course evaluations, chapter files and draft chapters.

Collection

William H. Wannamaker papers, 1917 - 1948 14 Linear Feet — 14000 Items

William Hane Wannamaker (1873-1958) was a professor and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University for over four decades. He served as Dean of Trinity College and Vice President for the Educational Division, and was responsible for critical decisions regarding student, faculty, and administrative policies. The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, evaluations, and other administrative materials. Major subjects include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, college sports, the hiring and promotion of faculty, and other administrative matters. English.

The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. The first series, Correspondence, covers the period of Wannamaker's tenure in those positions, 1917-1948, and is arranged chronologically. Topics include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, and other administrative concerns. The second series, Personnel, concerns the recruitment and development of the faculty for the years 1930 to 1948, and is arranged chronologically. Faculty appointments and promotions at all levels are included, as are the reports of departmental chairs. The third series, Subject Files, consists of a variety of materials related to Duke University, such as committee and council reports, and reports to the President. It is organized alphabetically.

Collection

Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

Collection

Clement Vollmer papers, 1898-1983 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Clement Vollmer joined the German Languages and Literature Department at Duke University in 1926, where he remained until his retirement in 1956. In 1918, he published The American Novel in Germany. Professor Vollmer served as chair of the department during the 1950s, as president of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association, and was a member of numerous academic societies. Includes correspondence, recommendations, faculty meeting minutes, German Department memoranda, grade books and department enrollment statistics. Also includes date books, address books and diaries kept by Maude Hugo Vollmer (Mrs. Clement Vollmer). Inclusive years are 1898-1983.

Contains materials related to Vollmer's career in the German Department at Duke, including correspondence, recommendations, minutes, memoranda, grade books, department enrollment, faculty appointments and wartime activities. Also includes correspondence relating to University Church services, the Academic Council and the Vigil. The rest of the collection includes address/date books and diaries (including travel diaries) kept primarily by Maude Hugo Vollmer, wife of Clement Vollmer. Also includes a list of houses (with architect names) in the Duke Forest, a New Testament, a University of Southern California handbook, a wallet full of expired oil company credit cards. Original brittle folders were replaced for preservation. Inclusive dates are 1898-1983.

Collection
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner's academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner's involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner's academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

Collection

Arlin Turner papers, 1953-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 600 Items

Arlin Turner was a professor in Duke's English Department from 1953 to 1978 and served as department chair during 1958-1964. The collection includes department memoranda, correspondence, minutes and documentation relating to English Department policies. Also included are minutes, memoranda and correspondence related to various committees Turner served on. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

Collection includes council and committee records including memos, correspondence, minutes of the University Council, the Humanities Council, the Undergraduate Faculty Council and the Graduate Affairs Committee of the University Planning Committee. There are also records of the English department, including minutes, correspondence, and memoranda. Files relating to student grades and personnel decisions were destroyed. The collection ranges in date from 1953-1979.

Collection
The Duke University Board of Trustees has existed since 1924, and grew out of the Trinity College Board of Trustees that existed from 1859 to 1924. The Board is responsible for making major steering decisions in the administration of the school. The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. English.

The Board of Trustees records contain minutes, agendas, correspondence, reports, subject files, trustee handbooks, and other records of the Board and Executive, standing, and ad hoc committees. The minutes include reports, correspondence, resolutions, recommendations for the conferring of degrees, for employment and renewal of employment, and other material. Reports include those made by University officers, Board committees, and outside consultants. The Board's records also include statements of funds and scholarships, investment reports, correspondence, audits, bylaws, petitions from students, and other material. The minute book covering June 1901-June 1910 was destroyed by fire in 1911, but some handwritten minutes for the period were preserved and have been typed out. There are gaps in the minutes for the period 1925-1930.

The collection is divided into three main sections: Trinity College, Duke University, and Duke University Unprocessed Materials. The Trinity College series begins in 1860 and ends in 1924, the year Trinity College became Duke University. There are minute books, topical files, and yearly files. Because a fire destroyed the minute book covering June 1901-June 1910, some handwritten minutes have been transcribed; these can be found in the yearly files.

The second series, Duke University, covers 1924 to the present. It includes minutes of the Board and the Executive Committee, general records of the Board and the Executive Committee, reports, financial records, committees, and unprocessed materials. All materials less than 50 years old are closed except by special permission, in writing, from the Board of Trustees.

The third series, Duke University Unprocessed Materials, consists primarily of materials less than fifty years old, and so are restricted except by permission from the Board of Trustees.

Collection

Edgar Tristram Thompson papers, 1915 - 1985 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Edgar Tristram Thompson taught Sociology at Duke University from 1937 until his retirement in 1970. The papers include correspondence with Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen; teaching materials from undergraduate and graduate courses in race relations, religion, and social anthropology; lecture notes from Thompson's mentor and sociology instructor Robert E. Park; research on plantations in Hawaii and in Africa as the Hugh le May Fellow at Rhodes University; development and operations of a Black Studies program and Center for Southern Studies at Duke University; short papers discussing race relations at Duke University and racial identity; autobiographical histories of Thompson's students; manuscripts for many books on race relations; records of participation in Alpha Kappa Delta and American Sociological Association conferences; a campus-wide graffiti survey; and addresses to the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham. English.

The material in this collection addresses American race relations and scholarly treatment of race from about 1940 to 1970. The bulk of the records date from 1920 to 1970. Included are manuscripts of papers by Thompson, his thesis, a bound volume of selected writings, personal and professional correspondence, printed matter, research notes, proofs, departmental budgets and other materials relating to the study and teaching of sociology. Primary sources include handwritten autobiographical histories written by African American students and surveys from a nationwide graffiti project. Major subjects in the manuscripts include race relations in the United States and in other countries, the South, religion in the South, international plantation systems, and sociological anthropology. There is also a small amount of material on the sociology of language. Also included are histories of the Department of Sociology, articles presented in symposia and conferences by Thompson, correspondence concerning the development, establishment, and operations of the Duke Center for Southern Studies (1965 to 1969) and the formation of a Black Studies program (1969). There are also papers from the Mayor's Committee on Interracial Affairs of Durham from 1945. Other materials include newspaper articles which address problems and violence in race relations and publicity of race relations events at Duke.

In addition to scholarly topics in sociology, this collection introduces perspectives on race relations at Duke University during the politically active 1960s and 1970s. There are a number of articles about Duke-sponsored race relations learning activities. Thompson was a strong advocate of learning about personal racial heritage and understanding social structures and events though that frame. He tried for many years, without success, to gain the Ford Foundation's sponsorship of race relations conferences and seminars; this topic received much attention from scholars in sociology. Correspondents include contemporary sociologists Herbert Blumer, Charles Ellwood, Eric Hoffer, Everett Hughes, and Howard Jensen. Thompson's greatest influence was Robert E. Park, a former instructor who was also an expert on race relations theory and plantation systems.

The Edgar T. Thompson papers were originally unorganized. Folders contained many types of documents covering a variety of topics and were loosely grouped by date according to year of accession of the material. The folders have since been further grouped into several series, and further by date within each series, where applicable. Many items in this collection are undated. A list of Thompson's writing can be found at the front of the bound volume The Papers of Dr. Edgar T. Thompson.

Collection

Charles S. Sydnor papers, 1729-1978 and undated 14.8 Linear Feet — circa 11,159 items

The Charles S. Sydnor Papers roughly span the period 1729-1978, the bulk dated 1923 to 1954. They include correspondence, research notes, writings, printed materials, and clippings, chiefly relating to Sydnor's teaching career at Duke University, as well as at Harvard and Queen's College, Oxford. The collection also includes information about his involvement with various historical associations and committees, including the American Historical Association, Southern Historical Association, North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, and the Advisory Committee of the Office of the Chief of Military History for the United States Army. There is background information pertaining to his various writings, including The Development of Southern Sectionalism (Volume V of the work A History of the South) (Baton Rouge, La., 1948), Gentleman Freeholders: Political Practices in Washington's Virginia (Chapel Hill, N.C., 1952), A Gentleman of the Old Natchez Region: Benjamin L. C. Wailes (Durham, N.C., 1938), Mississippi History (New York, N.Y., 1930), and Slavery in Mississippi (New York, N.Y., 1933). The papers contain notes and examinations for various history courses taught by Sydnor, student roll books, grade books, and papers. Additionally, there are a few notebooks and papers of Sydnor's while he was a student.

Materials relating to Sydnor's teaching career and participation in historical associations are found primarily in the Alphabetical Files Series and the Teaching Files Series. The information about Queen's College, University of Oxford, is located in the Alphabetical Files Series under Oxford. Information pertaining to his writings are found in the Writings and Speeches Series. Sydnor's own student notebooks and papers are found in the Miscellaneous Series. Topics highlighted include the Duke University Department of History during the late 1930s through the early 1950s, (Alphabetical Files Series); the writing and teaching of Southern history, particularly Mississippi history, (Writings and Speeches Series and Teaching Files Series); and the naturalist and planter, Benjamin L. C. Wailes (Writings and Speeches Series). A related collection in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library is the Benjamin L. C. Wailes Papers.

Collection
Philip Stewart is a professor emeritus of Romance Studies at Duke University. Stewart served on the Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was convened by Duke’s Academic Council in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Library Subcommittee, and include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, who initiated the Nixon Library proposal in August 1981; correspondence from Duke faculty and trustees; press clippings; Academic Council meeting minutes; and the Library Subcommittee’s report to the Academic Council. The collection also contains research and reports from the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, another group formed in the wake of the Nixon Library proposal.

Materials in this collection primarily relate to the research of the Duke University Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Library Relations, which was formed in September 1981 as part of a faculty initiative to study the potential impact of locating the Richard Nixon Presidential Library on the university campus. Materials also include research of the Academic Council’s Subcommittee on Governance, formed at the same time, which was to examine the authority of the university president and the faculty’s role in making decisions at the university.

The materials include correspondence from Duke President Terry Sanford, faculty, and trustees; press clippings; minutes of Academic Council meetings between August-November 1981; research, drafts, and the final report from the Library Subcommittee; and research and reports related to the Governance Subcommittee. The collection also contains documents regarding the Faculty Compensation Committee and some press coverage of the opening of the Richard Nixon Library and Museum in Yorba Linda, California, in 1990.

Collection
A native of Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, Margaret Taylor Smith attended Duke University from 1943-1947. After graduating with a degree in sociology, Smith and her husband relocated to Birmingham, Michigan. Smith raised four children while taking an active part in her community through volunteer work and leadership. Smith's work as a research associate studying family life became the basis for a 1987 book, Mother, I Have Something to Tell You. Smith served as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations. In addition, Smith continues her commitment to Duke University by holding leadership positions on multiple boards, by acting as a founding member and chair of the Council on Women's Studies, and by enabling the creation of the Sarah W. and George N. Taylor Endowment Fund for women's leadership and the Margaret Taylor Smith Endowed Directorship for Women's Studies. The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research on American families, specifically relationships between mothers and children, that resulted in the publication of a book, Mother I Have Something To Tell You; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Margaret Taylor Smith Papers contain materials dating from 1918 to 2010, with the bulk dating between 1980 and 2008. The collection documents Smith's voluntarism, leadership, and philanthropic activities at Duke University, especially in women's studies; her sociological research that resulted in the publication of a book; her social and family life; and her professional activities and voluntarism, particularly at the Kresge Foundation. Smith's original folder titles were retained. Smith, an avid note taker, often recorded information on the exterior of folders and manila envelopes. These folders were retained and appear in the collection. The collection is organized into five series: Duke University, Mother, I Have Something To Tell You, Personal Papers, Professional Voluntarism, and Additions.

The Duke University Series comprises materials related to Smith's leadership and professional voluntarism at the university, including correspondence, event planning notes, meeting minutes, endowment information, and speeches.

The Mother, I Have Something To Tell You Series documents the publication of the 1987 book, authored by Jo Brans, based on Smith's sociological research that describes how mothers deal with children who display untraditional behavior. Specifically, Smith researched American families whose children challenged social and sexual mores during the 1960s and 1970s. The series contains correspondence, drafts, speeches, and Smith's research related to the book, including the mothers' subject files, which typically contain written transcripts of Smith's interviews with the women, both with and without Smith's notes, questionnaires and sociological data, and audiocassette recordings of the interviews. Original audio recordings are closed to research. Use copies need to be created before contents can be accessed.

Materials related to Smith's social and family life are located in the Personal Papers Series, which primarily comprises correspondence with family, friends, and some professional associates, but also includes photographs, newspaper clippings, ephemera from Smith's days as an undergraduate at Duke University, and her father's World War I diary.

The Professional Voluntarism Series contains materials documenting Smith's professional activities, including awards, correspondence, speaking engagements, subject files, voluntarism, and philanthropy. The series particularly highlights Smith's work as the chair of the Board of Trustees of the Kresge Foundation, a national organization that awards grants to support non-profit organizations; her volunteer work with the Junior League; and her interest in ethics and ethical dilemmas.

Later Additions have not been processed. Accession (2010-0066) contains email correspondence. Accession (2010-0135) includes addition research materials, correspondence, proposals, and other miscellaneous notes. Accession (2010-0164) includes correspondence regarding the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture; the Duke University Women's Studies department; Smith's Class of 1947 and their reunions; and other miscellaneous materials and notes.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.