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The Working Groups in Feminism and History (WGFH, formerly the Feminist Women in History Group, FWHG) is a collective of graudate students and faculty from Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and other area universities that meets regularly to discuss scholarship in gender and history. The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History.

The collection includes fliers, correspondence, websites, and other materials related to the activities of the Working Group in Feminism and History. Included are captures of both the Feminist Women in History website from 2003 and the Working Group in Feminism and History site as of 2017; fliers for events organized by the group; correspondence regarding event planning, scheduling speakers, leadership of the group, and other topics; a printed out copy of the website for the Feminist Women in History Group; and schedules for events.

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The Women's Studies Program at Duke University started in 1983 and grew rapidly into one of the largest interdisciplinary programs at the University, now called Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program.

The Women's Studies Program Records contain materials related to the foundation, growth, activities, and alumni of the Women's Studies Program. Included are correspondence, minutes, reports, newsletters, flyers, budgets, programs, surveys, and many other materials. Topics include the development of the Women's Studies Program from a certificate program to an undergraduate major and minor as well as the growth of graduate scholarship; the curriculum of the Program and the inclusion of women's studies and women's topics in other areas of the University; outreach to and fundraising with Duke alumni women and others; programs and events organized by Women's Studies, especially the Graduate Research Conference and other large conferences hosted by Women's Studies; the work of the Council on Women's Studies; and a survey given to all women alumni of Duke from the 1920s through the 1980s including questions related to their Duke experience, activities since graduation, and perspective on women's issues, among many other subjects. The majority of the materials date from Jean O'Barr's tenure as director of Women's Studies.

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The Duke University Women's Department of Health and Physical Education began in about 1926 and merged with the Men's Physical Education Department in 1975. The Women's Department was responsible for providing required physical education courses, overseeing recreational and athletic activities, and providing a major in physical education. The Department had three chairmen during its existence: Julia R. Grout, Betty F. McCue, and Elizabeth C. Bookhout. The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records include correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. Major topics include the curriculum and administration of the department, student attitudes toward P.E., the attempt to build or renovate the gymnasium facility for women, the eventual merging of the Women's and Men's departments, and the effect of Title IX on women's athletics. English.

The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records consist of correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. The records are organized into two series: Alphabetical Files and Scrapbooks.

The alphabetical files primarily cover the period from the 1930s to 1975. Of note are photographs of women participating in physical education classes and sports; materials from the Women's Athletic Association and Women's Recreation Association; several surveys and reports from the 1960s and 1970s about women students' feelings and attitudes toward physical education; correspondence, estimates, and reports about the proposed building of a new facility for the department; correspondence and many reports which document the struggle with the administration to maintain the Department as a separate unit from the men's department in the 1970s; materials that discuss the effect of Title IX on women's sports and the growth of women's sports in the 1970s. Major figures include Julia R. Grout and Elizabeth C. Bookhout, both of whom served as Chairman of the department. The Alphabetical Files also include information on students who majored in physical education. In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

The Alphabetical Files are arranged by broad subjects: Addresses, Administration, Annual Reports, Budget, Correspondence, Curriculum, Departmental Studies and Reports, Facilities, History, Photographs, Publicity, Recreation, Staff Meetings, Task Force and Curriculum Committee Action, and Women's Athletics. Within each of these subsections, materials are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically. The original arrangement of the materials has been maintained as much as possible.

The Scrapbooks are compilations of photographs, clippings, programs, correspondence, and other memorabilia. There are three books which date from 1932 to 1975.

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William Klenz was an associate professor in Duke University's Department of Aesthetics, Art, and Music from 1947-1966. Collection contains sheet music and an unpublished manuscript by William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960. A later addition from Klenz's mentee and collaborator, Geoffrey Simon, contains manuscripts for Pacem in Terris, a cantata for mixed voices and organ (dated 1965), as well as an original performing score for Toccata ("Carillon"), dedicated to Simon (dated 1959 and 1962).

The collection consists of manuscript music and sheet music composed by Klenz, as well as supporting materials for some of the performances and some background information and a personal characterization of Klenz. The unpublished manuscript of William Klenz entitled The Elements of Music Theory, 1960, was donated to the Archives by a former student of Klenz.

The 2021 accession contains two additional manuscripts: first, Pacem in Terris, cantata for mixed voices and organ. Texts for Pacem in Terris were selected by Klenz from biblical and rabbinical texts cited by Rabbi Everett Gendler in his The Revolutionary Truism (The Saturday Review, February 13, 1965). The first performance of Pacem in Terris was conducted by Geoffrey Simon at American University (Washington, DC) on November 21, 1965. The material consists of the original manuscript, including an additional Intermezzo not in first manuscript; also contains one performing copy from premiere; one copy (scored in Sibelius) from a later performance; and one copy of program from the premiere.

Also donated in 2021 was an original performing score (copy of manuscript) of Toccata ("Carillon"), for organ, V-19-1959. This score was dedicated to the donor (see final page with Klenz signature, date, and "for G.S."). Its first performance was in Berlin, Germany, at the Neutempelhof Kirche on August 18, 1962.

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William Kenneth Boyd papers, 1851 - 1956 20 Linear Feet — 20000 Items

William Kenneth Boyd (1879-1938) was a historian, professor, and director of the library at Duke University. During his career at Duke and Trinity College, he published widely and helped to collect and preserve personal papers and books about Southern and North Carolina history. The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. Major correspondents include N. B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. There are also letters from W. E. B. Du Bois and other prominent African Americans. English.

The William Kenneth Boyd papers include correspondence, diaries, financial and legal materials, writings, notes, student papers, photographs (including tintypes), and other materials related to the personal and professional life of Boyd. The collection is arranged into seven series.

The first series, Personal, includes family materials like diaries, financial and legal materials, and other family writings. The diaries were written by Boyd's first wife and his daughter. The second series, Correspondence, includes personal, History Department, and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence. Major personal correspondents include N.B. McDowell, Pat LeGrand, Marion Colley, and John Spencer Bassett. Of particular interest in the personal correspondence are some letters Boyd exchanged with prominent African-Americans, including W. E. B. Du Bois, in 1899. The History Department and Library and Flowers Collection correspondence discuss research and administrative activities in these two areas of Duke University.

The third series, Writings, includes published and unpublished articles and books by Boyd. The fourth series, Notes, includes research and lecture notes taken by Boyd. The topics of both Writings and Notes tend to be about Southern and specifically North Carolina history. The next series, Teaching, primarily includes student papers about Southern and North Carolina history. The Library series includes administrative papers from when Boyd directed the library at Duke. The last series, Photographs, features family photographs, most of which are tintypes in excellent condition.

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William H. Wannamaker papers, 1917 - 1948 14 Linear Feet — 14000 Items

William Hane Wannamaker (1873-1958) was a professor and administrator at Trinity College and Duke University for over four decades. He served as Dean of Trinity College and Vice President for the Educational Division, and was responsible for critical decisions regarding student, faculty, and administrative policies. The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. Materials include correspondence, reports, evaluations, and other administrative materials. Major subjects include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, college sports, the hiring and promotion of faculty, and other administrative matters. English.

The William H. Wannamaker Papers are the official files of the Dean and Vice President of Trinity College and Duke University. The first series, Correspondence, covers the period of Wannamaker's tenure in those positions, 1917-1948, and is arranged chronologically. Topics include student discipline, faculty issues, World Wars I and II, and other administrative concerns. The second series, Personnel, concerns the recruitment and development of the faculty for the years 1930 to 1948, and is arranged chronologically. Faculty appointments and promotions at all levels are included, as are the reports of departmental chairs. The third series, Subject Files, consists of a variety of materials related to Duke University, such as committee and council reports, and reports to the President. It is organized alphabetically.

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William Henry Glasson (1874-1946) was Professor of Political Economy and Social Science at Trinity College and Duke University from 1902-1940, and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 1926-1938. Glasson was instrumental in the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School. Glasson specialized in U.S. pension systems. He was secretary of the Phi Beta Kappa Society for the South Atlantic district; editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly; and a member of the Durham Board of Education. Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. English.

Collection includes personal and professional correspondence, manuscripts, research notes, scrapbooks, diaries, diplomas, baptismal certificate, account books, postcards, and photographs pertaining to Glasson's family, career, and interests. Major subjects found in the collection are the growth of the Department of Economics and the Graduate School, Trinity's efforts to obtain a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and Duke University's contract with the Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association of America. Correspondence includes a letter to William P. Few (February 22, 1934) signed by 24 faculty members praising Duke's record on academic freedom, reports directed to University administrators, and copies of family genealogical material. A significant correspondent is H. Clay Evans, the U.S. Commissioner of Pensions. In 1934, Glasson and Dean Wannamaker were among a group of academics who travelled to Germany on a Carl Schurz Tour to see the effects of Hitler's rise to power. The scrapbooks include maps, clippings, postcards, notes, and an itinerary from this trip. Glasson's manuscripts include recollections of Trinity and Duke, a variety of writings and lectures on money and banking, pension systems, and Durham's charter of incorporation. There are 10 diaries (1898-1944), 3 family account books (1900-1937) including one that details Glasson's daughters' expenses while students at Duke, and scrapbooks of clippings, photographs of Glasson as a young man, poems, and photographs of Cornell University.

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William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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Wilbur Wade Card papers, 1876-1943 5.7 Linear Feet — 1250 Items

Wilbur Wade Card entered Trinity College in 1895 and became one of the school's best athletes. He set and broke numerous baseball records as an outfielder and hitter and served as captain of the Trinity baseball team in 1899 (for which he received his nickname, "Cap"). Card was invited by President John C. Kilgo to return to Trinity as Director of a new program in physical education. He remained at Trinity College/Duke University for the next 46 years. The collection includes volumes of physical education and examination records of male students from Trinity College and Trinity Park School, correspondence, photographs, a scrapbook, articles, clippings and miscellaneous printed matter. The collection ranges in date from 1876-1943.

The collection includes volumes of physical education and examination records of male students from Trinity College and Trinity Park School, correspondence, photographs, a scrapbook, articles, clippings and miscellaneous printed matter.

The physical education records include students' names and grades from Card's physical education classes. The physical examination volumes include information about each student, including his name, birthplace, father's occupation, which parent the student resembled, and general comments made by Card. Corresponding with this information is the date of the examination, the student's age, weight, height, the girth, depth and breadth of several body parts (such as knees, thighs, shoulders, etc.), the color of hair and eyes, temperament, and other facts.

The correspondence includes letters written to Card by former baseball and football players, including Arthur Bradsher, as well as copies of letters Card wrote. The athletics-related items include batting scores, etc. compiled by Card as well as writings he did, such as "Ben F. Few Makes the Greatest Outfield Catch" and "Three Greatest Plays Made by Trinity Men." He also wrote about Robert M. Gantt, a.k.a. "Big Bob."

The miscellany folders include a 1907-1908 map of Cambridge, MA (in the vicinity of Harvard College), event cards for the Trinity College Athletic Association's first field and track meet, a list of the strongest students in college in 1900 as well as other items related to the physical examination of Trinity students and athletic events, including a program for the first annual North Carolina Olympic Games in 1922. Also included are items related to Card's time at Harvard (including his own physical examination), the Raleigh Male Academy, the Franklinton Classical and Military Institute, Trinity College and Duke University, as well as clippings and some correspondence.

The State was a weekly survey of North Carolina, presented in magazine form. The issues in Card's collection include articles he wrote about athletics, including "Football Stars of By-gone Days," "No Hits and No Runs," and "Trinity vs. Carolina in 1898."

The scrapbook largely contains clippings and programs that relate to athletics at both Trinity College and Harvard and also includes the 1900 Trinity College commencement program as well as a program from the [President] McKinley Memorial Services (Mobile Theatre), September 1901. The pages are very fragile and the scrapbook should be handled with care.

The photographs include one oversized card-mounted photograph that is in need of repair as it is split into two pieces. The image is of the cast (of which Card's wife was a member) of an 1892 cantata called "Dream of Fairy Land." The program for the cantata can be found in the miscellany folder. The other photographs are largely card-mounted and include images of Card, his relatives, and athletic teams. Most are identified and some are dated.

The collection ranges in date from 1876-1943.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.