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Contains the records of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, an interdisciplinary degree-granting program for scholars at Duke University. The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies was established around 1968 in an effort to join and strengthen the medieval and renaissance programs at Duke University. Also includes materials of the Committee on Medieval and Renaissance Studies concerning the development of the program, the Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, and the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Types of materials include correspondence, budgets, newsletters, curriculum planning materials, announcements, reports, and minutes. Major subjects include the Duke University faculty, Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, university cooperation, renaissance study and teaching, and humanities study and teaching. Materials range in date from 1966 to 1982. English.

Contains correspondence, newsletters, curriculum planning materials, budgets, announcements, reports, and minutes pertaining to the establishment and operation of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Duke University. This collection reflects cooperative curriculum development among faculty of fine arts, sciences, literature, history, religion and philosophy departments. Materials range in date from 1966 to 1982.

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Erasmus Club records, 1926-1986 1.5 Linear Feet — approx. 1,000 Items

The Erasmus Club was a campus literary society which organized in 1926 for the encouragement of study and research in language and literature, and later, the humanities in general. The collection contains minutes, correspondence, memoranda, students' essays, financial records, announcements and other material. It ranges in date from 1926-1986.

The collection includes minutes, correspondence, memoranda, students' essays, financial records, announcements and other material. There are scattered lists of speakers and topics, of joint meetings with the faculty of UNC, and of papers submitted. The minutes for the period of 1926-1938 are in a bound volume which also includes correspondence, notes and newspaper clippings. Minutes for 1938-1960 are loose and arranged chronologically by academic year, although there are some gaps. Scattered minutes for later years can be found in the Secretary's files. Student essays submitted for the prize make up half the collection. Where known, the winning entry and runner-up are arranged chronologically. The remainder are arranged alphabetically by the author's last name. The material ranges in date from 1926-1986.

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Faculty records, 1911-1986 4.5 Linear Feet — about 4,000 Items

The responsibilities of faculty members, in addition to planning classes and providing instruction, included enacting regulations necessary to carry out instruction, advance the standards of work, and develop the scholarly aims of the school. The Faculty also recommended degree candidates and persons worthy of receiving academic distinction to the trustees. The records document administrative and academic concerns of university faculty members and officers from 1911-1986. They consist of bound volumes of minutes, reports, memoranda, agendas, and correspondence. The records also include a few invitations, proposals, announcements, newsletters, and newspaper clippings.

Members of various faculty councils, committees, and governing bodies of Trinity College and Duke University created these records between 1911 and 1986. The records document administrative and academic concerns of university faculty members and officers during this period of time. The records consist of bound volumes of minutes of the General Faculty (also referred to as the Faculty and later renamed the University Faculty), General Faculty Council, and the Council on Undergraduate Teaching (also called the Council on Undergraduate Instruction), along with folders of other material. The bulk consists of minutes, reports, memoranda, agendas, and correspondence.

These records reflect the actions of the following university bodies: the Commission on Faculty Reorganization, the Council on Undergraduate Teaching, the (General) Faculty Council, Faculty Meetings, the Faculty Organizational Committee, the Faculty Standing Committee on the Curricula, and University Faculty Minutes. These records contain the same types of documents as those found in the bound volumes; however, they also contain a few invitations, proposals, announcements, newsletters, and newspaper clippings.

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J. Deryl Hart records, 1957 - 1980 (bulk 1960-1963) 20 Linear Feet — 20,000 Items

Julian Deryl Hart (1894-1980), was Professor and Chairman of the Department of Surgery at Duke University from 1930-1960 and President of the University from 1960-1963. As President, Hart dealt with the affairs of administration; organized the Provost group to share in governance of the University; and significantly redefined the responsibilities of the university's administrative offices. During Hart's presidency, faculty salaries and professorships increased, and the admissions policy was amended to make it more equitable. Hart was an active member of the Governor's Commission on Education Beyond the High School. The J. Deryl Hart Records contain subject files from Hart's office files as President of Duke University and annual reports from university offices and departments to the President. Materials include correspondence, published reports, manuscripts, memos, clippings, copies of speeches and addresses, and other types of printed material. Major subjects include the development of the university and the Medical Center, the reorganization of the university's administrative offices, and the advancement of the faculty. English.

The J. Deryl Hart Records contain subject files from Hart's office files as President of Duke University and annual reports from university offices and departments to the President. Materials include correspondence, published reports, manuscripts, memos, clippings, copies of speeches and addresses, and other types of printed material. Major subjects include the development of the university and the Medical Center, the reorganization of the university's administrative offices, and the advancement of the faculty.

Access to Folders 117, 129, 142, 143, 145, 146, 565, 579, 580, and 584 is RESTRICTED. Please consult University Archives staff.

Two additions were made to the collection, in 1983 (A83-6) and in 2000 (A2000-87). These additions are separate series and are cataloged at the end of the finding aid.

Please consult the Duke University Medical Center Archives for materials that document Hart's career as a professor of surgery and Chairman of the Dept. of Surgery.

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Dr. Samuel DuBois Cook (1928-2017) was a political scientist who became Duke University's first African American professor in 1966. He also served as president of Dillard University from 1975 to 1997. The Samuel DuBois Cook Papers contains Cook's speech files, drafts and copies of Cook's writings, and other assorted papers including correspondence and subject folders for his research and writings on Benjamin Elijah Mays. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Samuel DuBois Cook Papers contains Cook's speech files, drafts and copies of Cook's writings, and other assorted papers including correspondence and subject folders for his research and writings on Benjamin Elijah Mays. The correspondence is scattered but dates as early as 1949 and includes some exchanges between Cook and Duke University contacts and administration, written during his tenure as professor in the political science department. Later correspondence discusses Dillard University administration, as well as other personal and professional exchanges. Cook's research on Benjamin E. Mays includes files from his editing of the volume "Benjamin E. Mays: His Life, Contribution, and Legacy," published in 2009, as well as other drafts and files collected by Cook about Mays' writings and philosophy. Cook's other writings include drafts compiled for his Ford Foundation appointment researching desegregation and racism in the 1970s; writings and essays about Reinhold Niebuhr, Martin Luther King Jr., and historically black colleges; and his reflections on black power and the strategies of the civil rights movement. The bulk of the collection consists of Cook's speeches, filed into Dillard University and Professional Speeches subseries and arranged alphabetically by topic or title of the speech. Many of these are administrative, including many introductions of various Dillard speakers or other remarks delivered by Cook as Dillard University president.

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Contains the records of the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, a cooperative institute established in 1963 under the auspices of the Duke University-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Cooperative Program in the Humanities. Also contains materials relating to the Duke University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Types of materials include correspondence, grant proposals, budgets, invitations, rosters, announcements, minutes, local publications, and some conference papers. Major subjects include the Duke University Cooperative Program in the Humanities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill faculty, Duke University faculty, the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Southeastern Renaissance Conference, university cooperation in North Carolina, renaissance study and teaching, and humanities study and teaching. Materials range in date from 1965 to 1981. English.

Contains materials of the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Duke University Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Materials mostly concern session planning and relations with the Cooperative Program in the Humanities. Types of materials include correspondence, grant proposals, budgets, invitations, rosters, announcements, minutes, local publications, and some conference papers. Materials range in date from 1965 to 1981.