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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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On June 2, 1911, the Omicron Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was the first sorority to install a national chapter on the Trinity College (now Duke University) campus. Contains the records of the Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, a social sorority for undergraduate women at Duke University. Materials include published histories, a songbook, clippings, correspondence, newsletters, cards, a scrapbook, and invitations. Major subjects include Trinity College history, Duke University history, women college students, sorority songs, general governance of a sorority, and initiation. Materials date from 1927-1979. English.

Collection includes the records of the Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, a social sorority for undergraduate women at Duke University. The Omicron chapter was established in 1911. Materials include published histories, a songbook, clippings, correspondence, newsletters, cards, and invitations. Major subjects include Trinity College history, Duke University history, Alpha Delta Pi, women college students, sorority songs, general governance of a sorority, and initiation. Materials date from 1927 to 1979.

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Alpha Epsilon Phi is a social sorority for undergraduate women. The Duke University chapter was established in 1934 and disbanded in the mid-1960s. The sorority was revived at Duke in 1977, with the establishment of the Alpha Epsilon chapter; it disbanded in 2004. Records include manuals, composite photographs, roll book, standards, project files, and other materials created and collected by the Alpha Epsilon Chapter of Duke University. English.

Records include manuals, composite photographs, roll book, standards, project files, and other materials created and collected by the Alpha Epsilon Chapter of Duke University.

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The Beta Eta chapter of the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity was established at Duke University in 1929; the chapter dissolved sometime after 1963. Records contain correspondence, bylaws, membership records, constitution, handbook, reports, certificates, and a brief history of the Beta Eta chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi. English.

Contains correspondence, bylaws, membership records, a constitution, a handbook, reports, certificates, and a brief historic profile pertaining to the Beta Eta chapter of the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity at Duke University. Materials range in date from 1929 to 1963.

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American Assembly is a national, non-partisan public affairs forum illuminating issues of public policy by commissioning research and publications, sponsoring meetings, and issuing reports, books, and other literature. It was founded by Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1950. The American Assembly sponsored southeastern regional meetings at Duke University from 1957 to 1961. Records include correspondence, printed matter, press releases, programs, agendas, reports, and other materials concerning the assemblies held at Duke University. Correspondents include Benjamin Ratchford, Lloyd Saville, and A. Hollis Edens. Major subjects include monetary policy and national goals. English.

American Assembly Records include correspondence, printed matter, press releases, programs, agendas, reports, and other materials concerning the assemblies held at Duke University. The bulk of the records date from 1959 to 1961, and relate to planning for the second and third southeastern regional assemblies held at Duke on monetary policy in 1959, and on national goals in 1961. Correspondents include Benjamin Ratchford, Lloyd Saville, and A. Hollis Edens.

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The American Dance Festival (ADF) serves the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers and professionals in dance-related fields by supporting the creation of new modern dance work; preserving modern dance heritage; building wider national and international audiences for modern dance; enhancing public understanding and appreciation of the art form; providing a sound scientific/aesthetic base for professional education and training of young dancers; and providing a forum for information on dance education. The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research. English.

The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Please note that the official repository for information about ADF is the American Dance Festival Archives.

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Art and Artifacts records, 1915 - 2005 2 Linear Feet — 1,300 Items

In January, 2005, funds granted by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation allowed the Duke University Archives to survey University-owned paintings within the Perkins Library system. Prior to the survey, records of University-owned art that had been collected by University Archives staff, and these records were organized and collated with the new survey information. Collection includes lists, inventories, correspondence, clippings, notes, memoranda, photographs, and other materials generated 1915-2005 and related to art and artifacts owned by Duke University, including information on the portaits of the Trustees of The Duke Endowment painted by Douglas Chandor. Other artists represented include Charles S. Wiltschek, John Da Costa, Mary Lyde Hicks Williams, Norval H. Busey, Irene Price, Cedric Egeli, Simmie Knox, John A. Furlow, and Nelson Shanks. English.

Collection includes lists, inventories, correspondence, clippings, notes, memoranda, photographs, and other materials generated 1915-2005 and related to art and artifacts owned by Duke University, including information on the portraits of the Trustees of The Duke Endowment in the Gothic Reading Room painted by Douglas Chandor. Other artists represented include Charles S. Wiltschek, John Da Costa, Mary Lyde Hicks Williams, Norval H. Busey, Irene Price, Cedric Egeli, Simmie Knox, John A. Furlow, and Nelson Shanks.

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Asian Students Association records, 1995-2005 10.6 Linear Feet — 1265 Items

Contains the records of the Duke University Asian Students Association from 1995-2005. Types of materials include a short history, agendas, minutes, budgets, correspondence, constitutions, resolutions, election materials, flyers, subject files, clippings, and a printed web page. Major subjects include Asian and Asian-American students, Asian and Asian-American culture, student life at Duke University, and governance of student groups. The Asian Students Association is a member of Spectrum, an intercultural coalition of student leaders and organizations at Duke University. English.

Contains a short history, agendas, minutes, budgets, correspondence, constitutions, resolutions, election materials, flyers, subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, and a printed web page pertaining to the general governance, social activities, and cultural activities of the Asian Students Association at Duke University. Materials range in date from 1995 to 2005

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The Biographical Reference Collection contains files of clippings, publications, biographical sketches, curriculum vitae, and other materials about the activities of Duke University administration, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as other people connected or associated with the University, including members of the Duke family. These files were compiled from a variety of sources by University Archives staff for use in reference and research. English.
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The Black History at Duke Reference Collection chronicles the integration of Duke University. This history includes the Silent Vigil; the Allen Building Takeover; the creation of a Black Student Alliance; the development of a Black Studies Program; interactions between the university and the Durham community; as well as individual efforts from students, faculty, and administrators. The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. Major subjects include black students, civil rights demonstrations, and the effects of desegregation on administrative policies. English.

The collection contains publications, fliers, reports, memos, handbooks, manuals, lists, clippings, and a bibliography. The collection is divided into six series: The End of Segregation, Black Faculty, Black Studies Program, Student Groups, Public Forums, and Clippings.

The first series, The End of Segregation, includes a bibliography, background materials about desegregation efforts, statistics, reports, and memos. The second series, Black Faculty, includes clippings, and a list of black professors, assistant professors, lecturers, non-tenure track instructors, graduate teaching and research assistants. The appendix to the list includes the Medical School and School of Nursing faculty.

In 1968, there were discussions on campus about establishing a black studies or Afro-American studies program, but no action was taken by the university. One of the demands of the students who took over the Allen Building on Feb. 13, 1969, was for the establishment of a fully accredited department of Afro-American Studies. On May 2, 1969, the Black Studies Committee submitted a proposal to the Undergraduate Faculty Council of the Arts and Sciences for the creation of the Black Studies Program and the courses were approved by the curriculum committee. Walter Burford was named program head in 1970. The third series, Black Studies Program, chronicles some of the history of this program and includes drafts of proposals, enrollment statistics, flyers, photocopies of clippings, and other materials.

The fourth series, Student Groups, contains materials from a variety of groups. Included are: the Afro-American Society, the Association of African Students, the Black Student Alliance, the Black Graduate and Professional Student Association, Black Fraternities and Sororities, and others. The fifth series, Public Forums, includes materials on a number of speakers, rallies, demonstrations, boycotts; one newspaper advertisement; and one Internet site. The sixth series, Clippings, contains mostly photocopies of newspaper articles. The clippings are from 1967-2001 and undated, and cover a wide variety of topics. Of note is a series of articles that appeared in the Chronicle, "Black and Blue: Blacks at Duke," Feb. 13-Feb.17, 1984.