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American Literature records, 1927-2000s 43 Linear Feet — 32,075 items

The earliest documents date from 1927, the year before the first issue was published. New material will continue to arrive as the journal's office deems files inactive. The bulk of the journal's papers consists of correspondence and editorial comments on submitted articles.

Aside from a relatively few submissions which seem to have been rejected after a single reading by the chair or other in-house editor (because they were too long or clearly unsuitable for the journal), articles were sent out to at least two members of the Editorial Board. They sent back written comments and a recommendation (reject, accept, accept pending revision). These responses make up the Editorial Comments Series(1928-1983) and a portion of the Correspondence and Editorial comments Series(1984-1989). By the late 1980s, the journal was receiving several hundred submissions each year, but the editorial comments suggest that the proportion of fine articles in the pool had not been maintained as sheer numbers increased. Members of the Editorial Board take on this responsibility in addition to their normal institutional duties.

The comments in the Editorial Comments Series are sometimes brief and dismissive, sometimes quite elaborate. Even in the absence of the rejected articles themsleves, they are a rich record of individual and institutional critical predispositions. In its early years, the journal was working to establish a solid documentary foundation for the profession of American literary study. Favored topics were unpublished manuscripts, biographical work, and influence studies. The journal was slow to accept the move to New Critical interpretations of texts, reluctant to give up its tradition of more empirical scholarship. Such moments of critical change or expansion - late 1960s psychoanalytical criticism, 1970s feminist readings, 1980s post-structuralism, etc. - are vividly documented by the Editorial Board's varied members. Not infrequently, one reader will enjoy the provocative nature of an article, while the other considers it to be careless scholarship or too polemical.

Most of the correspondence is in the Alphabeticaland Correspondence Series.It deals with submitted articles or reviews, but there are more substantial letters dealing with policy, critical positions, and disputes (primarily about reviews).

All other papers are contained in the Subject Files Series.Included there are correspondence preceding and relevant to the inception of the journal; Foerster Prize records; materials relating to the selection of editors and the formulation of policy; annual reports to the American Literature Section of the MLA; materials relating to Duke Press and publicity; and information gathered in the early years about who was doing what with American literature (for the purpose of mapping the field and finding reviewers).

Additionally in the Card Files Seriesthere are three boxes sized for 3 x 5 cards which are full of information saved by the American Literature offices between (roughly) 1928 and 1950. These constitute something like a scrapbook of American literature, containing: bibliography cards; sketches of periods and genres; course descriptions; etc. These materials are typed and handwritten. Finally, there are samples of the 5 x 7 cards used to process and keep track of submissions and book reviews. These cards do not contain information (in either their content or organization) that is unavailable elsewhere, but they do illustrate the process by which articles and book reviews were handled.

The accessions (2009-0177) and (2009-0242) include editorial comments and correspondence from American Literature, beginning in 1993 and continuing through the early 2000s. Materials are organized alphabetically by each person's last name.

(by box/period divisions, including only regular contributors)

  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Fred Lewis Pattee
  5. Ralph Rusk
  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell (minimal)
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Ralph Rusk
  5. Robert Spiller
  1. Killis Campbell
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  1. Norman Foerster (some)
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Laurance Thompson
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Clarence Gohdes (some)
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Stanley Williams
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Robert Spiller
  4. Stanley Williams
  1. Emory Holloway
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Austin Warren
  4. Stanley Williams
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Walter Blair
  2. Harry Hayden Clark
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Henry Nash Smith
  4. Willard Thorp
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Russell Nye
  4. Henry Nash Smith
  1. Lewis Leary
  2. Norman Pearson
  3. Henry Pochmann
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Norman Pearson
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Henry Nash Smith
  8. Floyd Stovall
  9. George Whicher
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
  8. George Whicher
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. William Charvat
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
  1. Edwin Cady
  2. William Charvat
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Sherman Paul
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Floyd Stovall
  1. James Beard
  2. Walter Blair
  3. William Charvat
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Theodore Hornberger
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Sherman Paul
  9. Henry Pochmann
  10. Ernest Samuels
  1. William Charvat
  2. Richard B. Davis
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. James D. Hart
  5. Theodore Hornberger
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Ernest Samuels
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. William Charvat
  4. Richard B. Davis
  5. R.H. Fogle
  6. James D. Hart
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Ernest Samuels
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Ernest Samuels
  9. Floyd Stovall
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. John T. Flanagan
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Ernest Samuels
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. Gay Wilson Allen
  3. George Arms
  4. James M. Cox
  5. John T. Flanagan
  6. R.H. Fogle
  7. Allen Guttmann
  8. David Levin
  9. Russel Nye
  10. Henry Pochmann
  11. Ernest Samuels
  12. John D. Seelye
  13. Lewis P. Simpson
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. James M. Cox
  3. Lawrence S. Dembo
  4. Warren G. French
  5. Allen Guttmann
  6. Annette Kolodny
  7. David Levin
  8. Russel Nye
  9. Donald Pizer
  10. Patrick F. Quinn
  11. John D. Seelye
  12. Walter Sutton
  1. Sacvan Bercovitch
  2. Lawrence S. Dembo
  3. Warren G. French
  4. Annette Kolodny
  5. J.A. Leo Lemay
  6. Jay Martin
  7. Terence Martin
  8. Roy Harvey Pearce
  9. H. Dan Piper
  10. Donald Pizer
  11. Joel M. Porte
  12. Patrick F. Quinn
  13. Walter B. Rideout
  14. John D. Seelye
  15. Walter Sutton
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Darwin Turner
  1. Nina Baym
  2. Sacvan Bercovitch
  3. Panthea Broughton
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Don Cook
  6. Hamlin Hill
  7. Annette Kolodny
  8. J.A. Leo Lemay
  9. T. Martin
  10. Hershel Parker
  11. Roy Harvey Pearce
  12. H. Dan Piper
  13. Joel M. Porte
  14. Walter B. Rideout
  15. Charles Scruggs
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Linda Wagner
  1. Elizabeth Ammons
  2. Martha Banta
  3. Nina Baym
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Cathy Davidson
  6. Scott Donaldson
  7. Norman Grabo
  8. Philip Gura
  9. Hamlin Hill
  10. Marcus N. Klein
  11. J.C. Levenson
  12. Horace Porter
  13. Donald A. Ringe
  14. Charles Scruggs
  15. Kenneth Silverman
  16. Werner Sollors
  17. Robert Stepto
  18. Linda Wagner
  19. Christof A. Wegelin
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Bernard I. Duffey papers, 1957 - 1983 1 Linear Foot — 1,000 Items

Bernard I. Duffey worked as an author and Professor of English at Duke University. Papers include correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, minutes, committee notes, course materials, manuscript materials and research notes. Major subjects include Bernard I. Duffey, Duke University, Duke University's Department of English curriculum, the Duke University Press, Program II, and study and teaching of American literature and poetry. Materials range in date from 1957-1983. Contains restricted materials. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the professional work of Bernard I. Duffey, author and Professor of English at Duke University. Papers include correspondence, notebooks, memoranda, minutes, committee notes, course materials, manuscript materials and research notes. Major subjects include Bernard I. Duffey, Duke University, Duke University's Department of English curriculum, the Duke University Press, Program II, and study and teaching of American literature and poetry. Materials range in date from 1957-1983. Contains restricted materials.

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Duke Mathematical Journal records, 1924-1988 27 Linear Feet — About 19,000 items.

This collection is largely comprised of correspondence of the individuals and organizations who communicated with the editors of the Duke Mathematical Journal. All correspondence related to accepted papers was kept, as well as a significant amount of correspondence related to rejected papers before 1970. Referee reports are also included, as well as billing and correspondence between the Journal and various publishing houses. Topics covered include edits to papers, requests for offprint copies, correspondence between editors, correspondence with the American Mathematical Society, and the Journal's budget and funding. The collection ends with a series of record books recording each paper received and reviewed by the Journal.

This collection is largely comprised of correspondence of the individuals and organizations who communicated with the editors of the Duke Mathematical Journal. All correspondence related to accepted papers was kept, as well as a significant amount of correspondence related to rejected papers before 1970. Referee reports are also included, as well as billing and correspondence between the Journal and various publishing houses. Topics covered include edits to papers, requests for offprint copies, correspondence between editors, correspondence with the American Mathematical Society, and the Journal's budget and funding. The collection ends with a series of record books recording each paper received and reviewed by the Journal.

The collection is organized into thirteen distinct series.

The first series is collated alphabetical files based upon the first letter of the subject, or the individual's last name. Each folder covers a year or a range of years, and each letter of the alphabet has five such folders, running from latest to earliest. Individual subject files for particularly prominent individuals and organizations are interspersed within the general alphabetical folders, and maintain roughly alphabetical order.

Series 2-7 are alphabetical files similar to the first series, with the difference that each letter of the alphabet recieved one folder covering a longer range of years, rather than several smaller folders for each letters. Subject files are interspersed alphabetically within series 2-3 as in series 1.

Series 8 is assorted subject files related to the period covered by series 4-7, where the subject files ceased to be interspersed throughout the series.

Series 9 represents a shift in the organizational structure, moving to a numeric system. As papers were submitted to the Journal, each was assigned a number and filed in chronological order, with any future correspondence related to that paper attached or stapled to the original piece of correspondence.

Series 10 retains the numerical structure of series 9, but adds two initial digits to each number signifying the year in which a paper was received.

Series 11 is also a numeric system, but the digits comprising the numbers changed in their significance. The first digit represents the last digit of the year (i.e. 1981 is 1, 1982 is 2, etc.). The next two digits signify the month the paper was received (01 represents January, 12 represents December). The following two digits represent the day of reception, while the last digit represents the order in which multiple papers were reviewed on that day. Thus, a paper with the number 104060 indicates that the paper was received on April 6th, 1981, and was the first paper to be processed that day.

Series 12 is comprised of miscellaneous correspondence unrelated to specific papers divided by year.

Series 13 is a series of record books documenting reception and processing of papers, and are in order by year.

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Duke University Press records, 1812-2019 487 Linear Feet — 2.98 Gigabytes

Duke University Press publishes both scholarly books and journals, primarily in the humanities and social sciences. In its early years, preference was given to works published by faculty, graduate students and alumni and to works focused on southern states. The records of Duke University Press span from 1812-2019 and consist of correspondence, annual catalogs, advertisements, annual reports, Board minutes, contracts and agreements, book and journal reviews, financial records, marketing files, the records of former director Steve Cohn, and facsimiles of the Carlyle letters.

The records are arranged in the following series: Director's files, Editorial Advisory Board, Editorial files, Author files, Subject files, Financial records, Catalogs, the Association of American University Presses, the Carlyle Letters, Marketing Files, and Steve Cohn Papers. The collection consists of correspondence, annual catalogs, advertisements, Board minutes, annual reports, contracts and agreements, book and journal reviews, financial records, correspondence, art and publicity related to the marketing of publications, and facsimiles of the Carlyle letters. The material ranges in date from 1812-2019.

Much of the contents list for the Editorial Files, Marketing Files, Steve Cohn papers, and Executive Support shared email were provided by Duke Press and have not been arranged or described by the Duke University Archives.

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The Duke University Press Reference Collection contains clippings, reports, forms, correspondence, brochures, and catalogs that pertain to the history and operation of the Duke University Press. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research. The materials in the collection date from 1922-ongoing.

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The Modern Language Association, American Literature Section (ALS) Papers date from 1921 to 1993 (bulk 1928-1993).Most of the Section's records consist of correspondence saved by Secretaries or Chairs and mechanically-reproduced reports, minutes, and ballots. These last materials are contained in folders designated "Reports" and dated by year. Additionally, there are folders of material used to compile reports (such as institutional polls and other "raw" information) generated by committees, concerning the American Literature journal and Section organization, and copies of papers to be delivered at Section meetings. Correspondents include Joseph Blotner, Edward Bradley, Edwin Cady, Paul Carter, Alexander Cowie, Richard Beale Davis, Robert Falk, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, William M. Gibson, Allan Halline, Harrison Hayford, Elaine Hedges, J. Herber, High Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Alexander Kern, Robert Edson Lee, J.A. Leo Lemay, Michael Millgate, William Mulder, Russel B. Nye, R.H. Pearce, Henry Pochmann, Walter B. Rideout, Louis D. Rubin, Robert Spiller, Willard Thorp, Arlin Turner, and James Woodress. Papers of the following individuals (past officers of the ALS), which pertain to the American Literature Group, are included in this collection: Joseph Blotner, John Gerber, Robert Edson Lee, Ernest Marchand, William Mulder, Charles Nilon, Henry Pochmann, Lewis P. Simpson, Robert Spiller, Willard Thorp, Arlin Turner, and Donald Yannella. Also, there are folders pertaining to these publications: Reinterpretation of American Literature, Eight American Authors, and American Literary Scholarship.

The folders are arranged chronologically based on the date of the earliest material contained in them. A few exceptions have been made for folders where the material is very unrepresentative of the whole. These folders are nonetheless dated by their entire span. Researchers are advised to begin with the "Reports" folders within the period that interests them, for they provide an overview of the year useful for making sense of contemporary folders of manuscript material, and in some cases indicate activities that have no documentation outside of these reports. Minutes from the December meetings sometimes occur as a discrete document and sometimes as part of a report mailed to Section members early in the following year. Since even these reports rarely contain much information that dates from later than the meeting, they have been placed in the "Reports" folders of the year of the meeting documented (i.e. reports dated early in one year appear in the folder for the previous year).

The records of the Section are augmented by the individual papers of a number of Section Chairs and Secretaries, also housed in the Hubbell Center.

Addition (00-041) (6 items, .1 lin. ft.; dated 1994-1999) includes annual reports for the ALS, 1994-1998, and a mold used to cast the Jay B. Hubbell medals.

Addition (08-267) (300 items, .3 lin. ft.; dated 1974-1987) includes records for the section’s Advisory Council over the period, as well as for the awarding of the 1986 Hubbell Medal.

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South Atlantic Quarterly records, 1926 - 1986 25 Linear Feet — 25000 Items

The South Atlantic Quarterly was founded in 1901 at Trinity College (later Duke University), and faculty from Trinity College and Duke University have served on its editorial board since its inception. The periodical, published by Duke University Press since 1930, began as a scholarly and literary journal about southern topics, and has since expanded to discuss national and international issues. The South Atlantic Quarterly Records consist mainly of correspondence regarding manuscript submissions and editing issues. Other materials include Board of Directors minutes, subject files, and content lists for individual issues of South Atlantic Quarterly. English.

The South Atlantic Quarterly Records consist mainly of correspondence regarding manuscript submissions and editing issues. Other materials include Board of Directors minutes, subject files, and content lists for individual issues of South Atlantic Quarterly. The materials date from the mid-1920s to the mid-1980s. The collection is organized according to accession number, from earliest to latest.

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William Thomas Laprade was Professor of History at Trinity College (now Duke University) from 1909 to 1953 and Chair of the Department of History from 1938 to 1952. Papers contain personal and professional correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. Major subjects include William Thomas Laprade, history of Trinity College, Trinity College Press, Duke University Press, Duke University Department of History, Duke University libraries, The South Atlantic Quarterly, the American Association of University Professors, study and teaching of European history, American Historical Association, the North Carolina Department of Archives and History, Kiwanis Club of Durham, and Phi Beta Kappa. Major subjects of correspondence include family life, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional activities of William Thomas Laprade, educator, historian, editor, and civic leader in the Duke University community. Papers include correspondence, notes, reports, printed materials, manuscript materials, photographs, diplomas, memorabilia, clippings, student papers, and letters. Materials include research and manuscript materials for books on 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe, as well as a letter from Anthony Eyre to his brother-in-law, Sir John Newton, English mathematician and astronomer (1660). Correspondence concerns professional interests, Laprade's family, the Great Depression, World War I, and World War II. A complete alphabetical index to named persons in this collection, including correspondence, can be found in Box 16. The oversize box contains materials from the Laprade collection that were formerly housed in the map cabinets and the General Oversize collection. Materials range in date from 1660-1975 (bulk 1898-1975).

Personal and Laprade family letters are concerned with family and local news, health, church meetings, grain production at the family mill in Rivermont, Va., the 1908 presidential election, and Laprade's father's voting machine invention. From about 1902 to 1904, Laprade participated in a large network of correspondence centered in the Weekly Courier-Journal newspaper of Louisville, Ky. Students wrote in, under pseudonyms, to discuss their ideals and problems. Other correspondence subjects include the effects of World War I and World War II on the Laprade family.