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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 and undated 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

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Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. They are organized into the following series: The Last and First Eskimos; Southern Color; North Carolina; The Idea of Cuba; Game Boy; May Day, 1970: Yale on Strike; Red White Blue and God Bless You: A Portrait of Northern New Mexico; New Mexico in Black and White; River of Traps (New Mexico); Rainbow Gathering; Philadelphia Experience Corps; Old And On Their Own; Mobile, Alabama; and Dream of a House. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia; students on strike at Yale University; counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona; a boy tethered to electronic technology; elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina; and views of the art-filled interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document his many collaborations with other photographers and writers, including noted photojournalist Gertrude Duby Blom and naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his long career at Duke University, as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake magazine. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's letters but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Behind the Veil Oral History Project was undertaken by Duke University's Lyndhurst Center for Documentary Studies in 1990. It seeks to record and preserve the living memory of African-American life during the age of legal segregation in the American South, from the 1890s to the 1950.

The Behind the Veil: Documenting African-American Life in the Jim Crow South Records span the years 1940-1997 (bulk 1993-1997) and are comprised chiefly of interviews recorded on cassette tapes. The 1260 interviews, 1993-1997, in this collection cover a number of topics related to African-American life in the 20th century with a focus on the age of southern segregation. The collection includes interviews with people from Albany, Ga.; Fargo, Ark.; Birmingham and Tuskegee, Ala.; Charlotte, Durham, Enfield, New Bern and Wilmington, N. C.; LeFlore County, Miss.; Memphis, Tenn.; Muhlenburg County, Ky.; New Iberia and New Orleans, La.; Norfolk, Va.; Columbia, Orangeburg, St. Helena, and Summerton, S. C.; and Tallahassee, Fla. In addition to interviews conducted specifically for the Behind the Veil project, the collection includes six interviews from the James City Historical Society, Craven County, N.C. as well as eight interviews conducted by Paul Ortiz in Tallahassee, Fla., in the summer of 1997 as part of his dissertation research.

The collection includes duplicate sets of approximately 1700 interview tapes. The Master Tapes Series is closed except for appropriate use by authorized staff from the Behind the Veil project and the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The Use Tapes Series contains copies of the tapes for use by researchers. The Printed Materials Series provides biographical information about informants, interview agreement forms, proper names sheets, and brief summaries (one-three pages) of each of the 1260 interviews. Also included are some personal papers, the earliest of which is dated 1940. The Transcripts Series currently includes unverified transcripts of 314 interviews in the collection. These transcripts are also available as electronic documents. A disk directory log exists. Contact Research Services staff for more information. More transcripts will be available each semester.

The Behind the Veil collection will eventually include approximately 5100 photographs and slides. This Visual Materials Series will contain items donated by informants and others in the communities where Behind the Veil field-workers conducted interviews. The vast majority of these pictures show family and community members at home or at special events. A smaller number portray buildings and other local places. Images of political events are notably rare in the collection. We also anticipate the eventual addition of the Behind the Veil project's papers, which will be held as the Administrative Files Series.

Behind the Veil interviewers were provided with a list of Interview Questions before they entered the field. Although most interviews in the collection do not follow the list question by question, the list provides a useful research guide to the type of inquiry many interviews follow. The list of questions is included as an appendix in this guide. Frequently discussed topics include family history, local neighborhoods, educational background, employment history, religious institutions, experiences of segregation, local political activities, civic organizations and activities, black-owned businesses and local culture. Behind the Veil informants represent a number of occupational groups, including domestic workers, educators, homemakers, health professionals, manufacturing workers, miners, ministers, political figures, professionals and servicemen.

Database:

A Behind the Veil Database, created by Alex X. Byrd, will soon accompany the collection. The fields included are in two categories: Informant and Circumstance of Interview. The Informant fields are Last Name, First Name, Middle or Maiden Name, Sex, Zip Code, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, and Principal Occupations. The Circumstance of Interview fields are Date of Interview, Location of Interview, Processing Subseries, and Interviewers. The other fields are: was the informant part of a group interview?; has the interview been transcribed?; if part of a group interview, under whose name is the material filed?; number of tapes for interview.

Consult reference staff concerning the availability of the database.

The addition (acc# 2001-0183)(100 items, 1.5 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) includes a course syllabus, interviews of African-American North Carolinians on cassette tapes, some student self-evaluations, contracts, indices, and transcript excerpts. The area most represented is Durham, N.C. Students were to aim for insight into how African-Americans built communities during an age of racial oppression. The interviews include much information about family history and social and community issues.

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Bonnie Campbell papers, 2000-2016 3 Linear Feet — 4 boxes

Printed materials, advertisements, and publications designed by Bonnie Campbell, former Art Director at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Collection consists of printed materials and publications designed by Bonnie Campbell during 16 years as Art Director at the Center for Documentary Studies. Campbell's work included designing promotional and marketing materials, such as postcards, posters, and brochures, for many CDS programs and projects including their Duke curriculum programs, community programs, exhibits, and awards series. Campbell also designed several CDS publications, including Document, the center's newsletter, along with photography books Beyond Beauty: Photographs from the Archive of Documentary Arts, One Place: Paul Kwilecki and Four Decades of Photographs (Paul Kwilecki), Sodom Laurel Album (Rob Amberg), and In This Timeless Time (Bruce Jackson).

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Caroline Vaughan photographs, 1977-1992 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 64 items — 63 prints; one brochure

Collection comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, friends, couples, and families. Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University. Also includes several prints and a brochure from an exhibit entitled "Home Ground," featuring Vaughan's family and landscapes from two family farms, 1977-1987. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and four palladium/plantinotype prints, along with a hand-pigmented, textured print. The photographs range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11x14 inches and are all matted, captioned, and signed. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection chiefly comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken by Durham photographer Caroline Vaughan from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, gay and straight couples, friends, and families, Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University who were involved in sixties activism and remained in the area.

There are several photographers featured in the portraits whose work is also in the Rubenstein Library collections: Peter Goin, Alex Harris, Jeeva Rajgopaul, and Margaret Sartor.

Also includes a smaller series of black-and-white palladium/platinotype prints and a bifold brochure from a Duke University exhibit entitled "Home Ground." These prints feature Vaughan's family members posed in the studio and at two family farms in Oxford, N.C. and News Ferry, Virginia, taken from 1977 to 1987 and printed in 1992 and 1993.

The photographs were taken with large-format cameras and an instant camera (Polaroid), and printed and toned by Vaughan chiefly from 1990 to 1993. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and palladium/plantinotype prints, along with one hand-pigmented, textured print. The prints range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11 x 14 inches and are printed on a variety of papers. Some of the palladium prints feature a circular image format. With a few exceptions, the prints are signed, dated, and matted. Titles were taken from original captions inscribed by the photographer on the prints or mats. Some titles for some uncaptioned prints were taken from the photographer's online gallery. Many prints have data on exposure times, shutter, speed, and other data marked on the back.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Center for Documentary Studies was established at Duke University in Durham, N.C. for the study of the documentary process. The collection contains 51 black-and-white and color photographs, chiefly 11x14 and 16x20 inches, that were selected by CDS staff from portfolios published in DoubleTake magazine or by DoubleTake books from 1995 to 1997, and were exhibited at the CDS galleries. Many of the images were taken in the southern United States, but there are also scenes from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, and from countries such as Mexico, Vietnam and Ireland. Some images are dated as early as 1906 and 1940. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection contains 51 black-and-white and color photographs that were selected by Center for Documentary Studies staff from portfolios published in DoubleTake magazine or by DoubleTake books from 1995 to 1997; they were were exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University galleries.

Many of the images were taken in the southern United States, but there are also scenes from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, and from countries such as Mexico, Vietnam and Ireland.

The prints range widely in size from 8x10 to 20x24 inches, but the most typical sizes are 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Black-and-white gelatin silver prints predominate, with some color prints present.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Center for Documentary Studies records, 1990-[ongoing] 14.6 Linear Feet — 13,050 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. Collection contains publications, calendars, announcement, brochures, newspaper and magazine clippings, a videocassette, and other materials such as administrative files and electronic files. The materials date from 1990 and the collection is ongoing.

Collection contains publications, calendars, announcement, brochures, newspaper and magazine clippings, a videocassette, and other materials. Publications include Up for Grabs (1996-). Also included is a videocassette of the opening of the CDS, 23 January 1990, features remarks by Center director Iris Hill, and Dean R. A. White, Robert Coles, and Reynolds Price. Accessions UA2010-0024 and UA2011-0003 contain promotion materials including exhibit postcards and administrative records. The administrative records are restricted for 25 years from date of origin.

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Center for Documentary Studies, SNCC Legacy Project Critical Oral Histories Conference Interviews, 2016-2018, 2016-2018 260 Files — MP4 video files, JPEG image files, MP3 audio files, PDF text files, and plain text files. — 75 Gigabytes

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The 2016 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on "The Emergence of Black Power, 1964-1967," while the 2018 Critical Oral Histories Conference focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Digital videos, photographs, and transcripts documenting critical oral history conferences in 2016 and 2018, with Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee veterans, hosted by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. The Critical Oral Histories Conference in 2016 and 2018 were an extension of the SNCC Legacy Project that placed SNCC veterans in conversation with scholars using primary source materials. The events were produced by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University and the SNCC Legacy Project. Series One contains the 2016 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the years 1964-1967, to discuss the emergence of "Black Power" as an ideological concept as well as political and economic framework. Participants included Charlie Cobb, Courtland Cox, Gloria House, Phil Hutchings, Jen Lawson, Charles McLaurin, Cleve Sellers, Shirley Sherrod, Karen Spellman, Judy Richardson, Maria Varela, Geri Augusto, Emilye Crosby, Worth Long, Hasan Jeffries, Betty Mae Fikes, Bertha O'Neal, John O'Neal, Michael Simmons, and Zoharah Simmons. Series Two contains the 2018 Conference interviews, in which narrators focused on the efforts directly leading to the Voting Rights Act of 1965, with participants including Phillip Agnew, Geri Augusto, Rebecah Barber, Kenneth A. Campbell, Charles Cobb, Courtland Cox, Emilye Crosby, Amber Delgado, David (Dave) Dennis, Sr., Ajamu Dillahunt, Hasan Kwame Jeffries, Timothy (Tim) L. Jenkins, Edwin King, Dorie Ann Ladner, Jennifer Lawson, Danita Mason-Hogans, Miles McKeller-Smith, Charles McLaurin, Ambria McNeill, Aja Monet Bacquie, Janet Moses, Robert Moses, Edna Watkins Muhammad, Quinn Osment, Timothy B. Tyson, Hollis Watkins, and Curtis Wilkie.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.