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Charles K. Bradsher papers, 1951-1997 1.8 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Charles Kilgo Bradsher was a Class of 1933 Duke alum and a Duke professor in the Chemistry Department from 1939-1979. His collection includes personal and departmental materials, especially concerning the Chemistry Department, the Gross-Edens Affair.

Collection includes personal and departmental materials concerning the history and faculty of the Department of Chemistry and the teaching of chemistry, the Gross-Edens Affair, long range planning, and research. Contains correspondence with Paul Gross concerning the Gross-Edens affair and documents regarding faculty promotions which should remain confidential. Replaced folder labels and discarded packet of departmental receipts for processing.

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Charles Roy Hauser papers, 1924-1969 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Charles R. Hauser was a 40 year faculty member at Duke University. He came to Duke as an instructor in Chemistry in 1929. He was appointed to full professor in 1946 and was named a James B. Duke professor of chemistry in 1961. Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Materials in the collection date from 1924 to 1969.

Collection primarily consists of abstracts of articles which Hauser was co-author. Collection also contains a few personal items including his transcript from the University of Florida-Gainesville, the final examination program for his Ph.D., commemorative certificate for the American Chemical Society Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, and a letter offering the position of Instructorship in Chemistry at Duke University.

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Douglas Greenwood Hill papers, 1947-1961 0.5 Linear Feet — 100 Items

Douglas Hill was a Professor of Chemistry at Duke University from 1931-1968. His specialty was high temperature and solid-state chemistry. The collection includes correspondence, technical papers, reprints and other materials and ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated material.

The collection includes typescripts of scientific papers, related correspondence and graphs. It ranges in date from 1947-1961 and includes undated materials.

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Lucius A. Bigelow (1892-1973) served as a professor in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University from 1929 to 1961. Papers of Lucius A. Bigelow include correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs during his career as a professor of chemistry at Brown University and Duke University. Major subjects within the papers are fluorine chemistry, organic chemistry, chemistry education, and research conducted for the Manhattan Project, the Office of Naval Research, and the Army Research Office. Professional correspondents include H. S. Booth, Henry Gilman, and William A. Noyes. English.

Records produced by Lucius A. Bigelow throughout his career as a professor of chemistry both at Brown University and Duke University. Materials are present from 1915 to 1973. The bulk of the records consist of correspondence, class examinations and procedures, research papers, research status reports, and photographs. The majority of the material pertains to Bigelow's time at Duke University however, there is some material stemming from his tenure at Brown University.

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Marcus E. Hobbs papers, 1935 - 1980 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Marcus Edwin Hobbs, Duke University educator and administrator, served as Chair of the Chemistry Dept. (1951-1954), Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1954-1958), Dean of the University (1958), Vice Provost (1962-1963), and Provost (1969-1970), before his retirement in 1970 as Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham. English.

Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham.

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Contains the personal and professional records of Paul Magnus Gross, a Duke University administrator, researcher, educator, and scholar. Gross was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). The Paul M. Gross Chemistry Laboratory was named in his honor. Gross was also an independent consultant with the United States Army and various commercial companies. Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Major subjects include Duke University, the Graduate School, the Department of Chemistry, University Council, the Board of Trustees, University Research Council, Duke University administration, University Committee on Long-Range Planning, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, study and teaching of physical sciences, military training, war education, munitions development, United States Navy, United States Army, Office of Ordnance Research, universities in the southern United States, and the Gross-Edens controversy. Major correspondents include J. Deryl Hart, Robert Lee Flowers, Douglas M. Knight, Marcus Hobbs, Charles E. Jordan, and Arthur Hollis Edens. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Paul M. Gross. Gross served as a leader of many national scientific organizations. At Duke University, he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. Box 43 was added to the finding aid 8 March 2007 and is unprocessed.

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W. H. Pegram papers, 1876 - 1928 1.75 Linear Feet — 1700 Items

William Howell Pegram (1846-1928) was a student, professor, and administrator at Trinity College (N.C.). He moved with the school from Randolph County to Durham County (N.C.), and remained active as Trinity College evolved into Duke University. The W.H. Pegram Papers include correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material. His relationship with Braxton Craven, both professionally and personally, is detailed. Among the subjects in the collection are Pegram's main academic interest, chemistry, and the administration of Trinity College in both Randolph and Durham counties. English.

The W. H. Pegram Collection includes correspondence, notebooks, writings, clippings, and other material related to Pegram's career at Trinity College and later Duke University. The first series, Personal, is a brief series containing clippings and other material regarding Pegram's career and his death in 1928. The second series Correspondence, contains letters to and from Pegram, mainly regarding administrative issues at Trinity College. There are also some letters of thanks from former students. This series is arranged chronologically. The third series is Notebooks, and contains notebooks used by Pegram for a variety of purposes: to record the attendance and grades of his students, to prepare Sunday school lessons, to work on chemistry problems, and to write essays. The notebooks are arranged by title or subject, when available, then date. The fourth series, Writings, contains several essays prepared by Pegram, as well as shorter pieces. This series is also organized by title, when available, and then date. The last series, Trinity College, contains a variety of materials related to the history of the school. These materials are not all directly related to Pegram, but they provide a historical context for his other materials. It contains clippings, articles, financial papers, and print materials about the school. These papers are organized alphabetically.