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Joseph John Spengler papers, [ca. 1896]-1987 111.8 Linear Feet — 60,387 Items

Chiefly correspondence, printed material, critiques of publications, bibliographies, class notes, and other papers relating to his career, publications, and affiliation with different economics associations (26,378 items, 52.7 linear feet; dated 1928-1987). Some are photocopies of Spengler's correspondence with William Richard Allen. The collection also includes manuscripts of some of his works, information concerning Duke University's administrative policies and staff, reprints of published articles relating to his career, and a charcoal portrait. (1-9-87, 88-010, 93-180, 00-213) No container lists exist for these accessions.

Addition #93-294 (34,009 items, 59.1 linear feet; dated [ca. 1896]-[ca. 1976], bulk 1914-1960) contains primarily business and Spengler and Kress family correspondence, especially between Dot and Joe ([ca. 1919]-[ca. 1976]). Also includes manuscripts for Dot's genealogical novel, Family Saga in America ([ca. 1930s]) and Joe's work, Life in America; as well as Dot's journals and diaries (1924-1939, 1969). There are Christmas cards, postcards, and newspaper clippings; photographs of family and friends, including 2 tintypes, 32 cartes-de-visite, 1 color and 91 black-and-white prints, and 76 healthy nitrate negatives; and lace knitted by Dot's grandmother.

Also includes 6 photograph albums kept by Dot, two of which contain pictures taken by her with a brownie camera in and of Piqua, OH (1914-1919). The other albums contain photographs and memorabilia depicting Dot's life as a college student at Miami University, OH (1919-1921); and two showing views of the Spengler's homes, friends, and life in Tuscon, AZ, Tampa, FL (1930-1938), and Durham, NC and Duke University (1932-1940). The latter also records the 1938 Duke University faculty baseball team.

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Edwin Burmeister papers, 1960-2008 14.4 Linear Feet — 10,800 Items

Professor of Economics at Duke University. Collection contains teaching materials, research files, writings, correspondence with other economists, papers and presentations, and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

Collection contains teaching materials; research files; writings; correspondence with other economists, including Paul Samuelson; papers and presentations; and personal files chiefly related to Burmeister's work as a professor of economics at Duke University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Many collection materials document Burmeister's research on Capital Theory, Economic Growth Theory, and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT).

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Allan Murray Cartter papers, 1955-1959 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Allan M. Cartter was a professor of Economics and Dean of the Graduate School at Duke from 1959 to 1962. The collection contains two book manuscripts, for The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). The collection ranges in date from 1955-1959.

Collection contains manuscripts of two of Cartter's published books: The Redistribution of Income in Postwar Britain (1955) and The Theory of Wages and Employment (1959). Items were untied and foldered for processing. It ranges in date from 1955-1959.

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Lionel W. McKenzie papers, 1942-2004 and undated 22 Linear Feet — 16,500 Items

Lionel McKenzie (1919-2010) was an economist whose main areas of research were general equilbrium theory and turnpike theory. McKenzie began his career as an assistant professor at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 before becoming chairman of the Economics Department at the University of Rochester in 1957, where he taught until his retirement in 1989. McKenzie also served on a number of prominent international economic organizations, where he helped to further the discourse in the discipline. Collection contains correspondence, writings, research notes, and other written material from throughout McKenzie's career. The papers span the years 1942-2004 and document his work as an economic theorist and educator.

The Lionel W. McKenzie Papers span the years 1942 to 2004, with the bulk of the material dating from 1960 to 1990. Through correspondence, research notes, article drafts, teaching material, lectures, and published materials, the collection provides a broad overview of his professional career. McKenzie's greatest contribution to economics has been through his work in conjunction with Kenneth Arrow and Gerard Debreu on general equilibrium, and his writings on capital theory and turnpike theory, all of which are documented in a variety of forms throughout the collection. Significant correspondents include noted economists Paul Samuelson, Tjalling Koopmans, and Robert Solow. Other aspects of his career are documented, such as his involvement in a number of economic organizations, especially the Econometric Society and the Mathematical Social Sciences Board; his role as organizer of a number of academic conferences, such as the Value and Capital Conference of 1988; and his teaching career at Duke University from 1948 to 1957 and at the University of Rochester from 1957 to 1989. The papers are organized into the following series: Conferences; Correspondence; Course Materials; Organizations; Personal Files; and Research and Writings.

The Conferences Series includes material from conferences McKenzie attended and organized throughout his career and includes copies of programs, articles given, and other related documents. The Correspondence Series, the largest of the collection, contains largely official and routine correspondence, but also includes a sizeable number of letters on intellectual topics. The Research and Writings Series, the second largest, has various drafts and iterations of most of McKenzie's published work as well as some unpublished material. Many of the notes contain complicated mathematical notations documenting the theoretical foundations for his work. A small set of writings by others, chiefly on game theory and convex sets, conclude the series. The Course Materials Series houses syllabi and other materials from the seminars he taught, including many versions of the handwritten text for his general equilibrium seminar, documenting his teaching methods as well as the evolution in his thinking on the subject. In the Organizations Series, extensive documentation can be found of McKenzie's involvement with various economic organizations, including internal discussions on the workings of many of these groups. The smallest group of records, the Personal Files Series, contains curriculum vitae, personal correspondence, and other ephemera.

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Dept. of Economics records, 1938-2005 11 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The study of economics has a long history at Duke University. Economics classes were taught at Trinity College, the forerunner of Duke University, as early as the 1899-1900 academic year. Several individuals particularly important to the Department's development and programming: include Calvin Bryce Hoover; Joseph J. Spengler; H. Gregg Lewis; and Martin Bronfenbrenner. The collection contains miscellaneous office files associated with the daily operations of the Department of Economics including: correspondence, memoranda, class schedules, faculty rosters and files, reports, and undergraduate honors theses. Also present are the Working Papers in Economics produced by the Department of Economics, Duke University dating 1981-1990, 1992.

Collection contains miscellaneous office files associated with the daily operations of the Department of Economics including: correspondence, memoranda, sound recordings, class schedules, faculty rosters and files, reports, undergraduate honors theses, and material concerning TIPS (Teaching Information Processing System) a programmed learning technique developed at Duke. Also present are the Working Papers in Economics produced by the Department of Economics, Duke University dating 1981-1990, 1992. Accession UA2008-0047 largely includes files pertaining to the Triangle Census Research Data Center. This accession is restricted for 25 years from date of origin of the material.

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Lloyd B. Saville papers, 1936-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Lloyd B. Saville was an educator, researcher, scholar and economist, specializing in economic history and theory. His career at Duke University spanned the years 1946-1979 and encompassed teaching, administration, research, and publication. Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching and research interests. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

Collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, scholarly papers, grant applications, exam questions, printed matter, newspaper clippings, reports and other materials concerning international economic studies, seminars and societies, and Saville's teaching/ research interests. Correspondents include Calvin B. Hoover and economists in Italy. Materials range in date from 1936-1979, bulk 1950-1979.

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E. Roy Weintraub papers, 1930-2019 and undated 15.5 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — 1.1 Gigabytes

E. Roy Weintraub (b.1943) is Professor Emeritus of Economics at Duke University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, and writings.

The E. Roy Weintraub Papers document his career as a historian of economics and mathematics, and professor at Duke University. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on the history of economics, role in the community of history of economics scholars, and as a faculty member and administrator at Duke.

The collection also documents his communications with prominent economists as research subjects such as Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, and Lionel McKenzie. Included in Weintraub's communications are exchanges with prominent figures in the history of economics and related communities of scholars such as Roger Backhouse, Bradley Bateman, Anthony Brewer, Arjo Klamer, Mary Morgan, Deirdre McCloskey, and Philip Mirowski.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Weintraub's roles at in the History of Economics Society, at Duke University, and as an editor of History of Political Economy.

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Robert S. Smith papers, 1930 - 1969 11 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Robert Sidney Smith (1904-1969) taught economics at Duke University for over 35 years. His research focused on Latin American and South American economic thought. The collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials. Major topics include Latin American and South American economic thought and policy, the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, and the Department of Economics and Business Administration at Duke University. English, and Spanish or Castilian.

Collection includes correspondence, reprints, manuscripts, notes, microfilms, and other published materials related to Smith's professional career as an educator and economist. Much of the material is in Spanish, reflecting his activities and research interests in Latin American economic history and development, and the history of Hispanic economic thought. Other matters treated in the files concern the Dan River Textile Mills in Danville, Virginia, Smith's work as a government consultant, and as a teacher of economics in South America and Latin America., and affairs of the Department of Economics and Business Administration. There is some material related to the courses he taught, and to personal affairs and writings.

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Benjamin U. Ratchford papers, 1924 - 1980 4.5 Linear Feet — 3,000 Items

Benjamin U. Ratchford (1902-1977) served as professor of economics at Duke University from 1928-1960. An expert in public finance, Ratchford was involved a number of economic policy projects, including the reconstruction of Germany after World War II. The papers consist of correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, clippings, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects include Duke Univ. administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the U.S. War Department, and monetary regulation. English.

The Benjamin U. Ratchford Papers contain correspondence, subject files, teaching materials, documents, writings, notes, reports, a journal, and a scrapbook. Major subjects present within the collection include the Duke University administration and Economics Dept., the Federal Reserve Bank, the Office of Price Administration, the economy of Germany after World War II, the United States War Department, and monetary regulation.

The papers are organized into two series, Correspondence and Subject Files. The Correspondence series contains correspondence with a number of individuals and organizations relating to Ratchford's work as a professor, researcher, economic advisor, and editor. The correspondence also outlines his role as vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Subject Files series covers various topics, including the Federal Reserve Bank, the Duke University Economics Department, teaching materials, the resignation of President A. Hollis Edens, the Office of Price Administration, economics organizations, and economics subjects. Also present in this series are several travel logs, including a scrapbook documenting a 1936 road trip across the country and a journal kept during Ratchford's 1945-1946 trip to Berlin working as an Economic Advisor for Level of Industry to the Office of Military Government for Germany.

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Calvin Bryce Hoover papers, 1922-1970 41.5 Linear Feet — 40,000 Items

Calvin Bryce Hoover (1897-1974) was an economist, a scholar, and a leader in public service. A member of the Duke faculty from 1925 until his retirement in 1966, Hoover served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1937-1957, and Dean of the Graduate School from 1938-1948. Hoover is widely accepted as the founder of the field of comparative economics. Materials include correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials. Major subjects of the collection are the economic conditions in the Soviet Union, Germany, and the United States in the 20th century; the administration of an academic department during wartime; Soviet economic policy; Soviet politics and government; the formation of New Deal agricultural policies in the South; and the Office of Strategic Services. English, German, and Russian.

The Calvin Bryce Hoover papers span the years 1922-1970, with the bulk falling between 1929 and 1968. The collection is arranged into nine series: Correspondence; Writings; Academic Materials; Professional Associations; Government Service; Subject Files; Audio-Visual Material; Personal; and Printed Material. The collection includes correspondence, departmental files, reports, photographs, sound recordings, books, articles, clippings, scrapbooks, date books, and other printed materials.

The first series, Correspondence, contains mostly academic or professional correspondence. The correspondence is arranged alphabetically, except for Box 27 which contains correspondence from or about the National Planning Association. It is important to note that Hoover tended to file his correspondence by subject, rather than by correspondent. As such, a file labeled "John Doe" may not necessarily contain correspondence written by "John Doe," but may include correspondence about "John Doe."

The second series, Writings, includes copies of Hoover's publications, unpublished material, addresses, drafts, notes, publication agreements, and correspondence. The third series, Academic Material, includes departmental files, course files, and other materials associated largely with Hoover's work at Duke University. The series includes material about the Economics Dept., professors, courses taught by Hoover, correspondence, theses, and other files. The fourth series, Professional Associations, includes files on the American Economic Association, the Southern Economic Association, and the Ford Foundation.

The fifth series, Government Service, includes general subject files, files on war agencies, the Committee for Economic Development, and the Council on Foreign Relations, the Economic Cooperation Administration, and correspondence. The sixth series, Subject Files, includes general topical files. The seventh series, Audio-Visual Material, includes photographs and audio reels. The eighth series, Personal, includes Hoover's personal school papers, souvenirs, and personal papers belonging to Hoover's wife, Faith.

The ninth series, Printed Material, includes publications not authored by Hoover. There are a fair number of these in German and Russian.

This collection contains materials that would lend itself to many areas of research interests. Of note is the material pertaining to the Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) which offers a unique picture of the work of the O.S.S. in Scandinavia, the Chief of Mission in Stockholm, Hoover's administrative style and means of controlling this operation, his philosophy of intelligence, and many day to day details of the profession of espionage.

Other topics of interest include the administration of an academic department during wartime, Soviet economic data and collection techniques of the 1930s, the formation of New Deal agricultural policies, and the development of the American foreign aid program.