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Collection

Allan H. Bone papers, 1944 - 1989 12 Linear Feet — 12000 Items

Allan H. Bone (1917-1992) spent nearly forty years in the Duke University Department of Music. He served as professor of music, chair of the department, and conductor of the Duke Symphony Orchestra. The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners. English.

The Allan H. Bone Papers include material related to conducting, music subjects, courses, research, and the administration and history of the Duke University Department of Music. It also includes concert programs from Duke University performances, personal correspondence, and daily planners.

Collection
The Department of Aesthetics, Art & Music was established at Duke University in 1942. In 1960, the Department of Music was recognized as an independent department and Dr. Allen H. Bone was appointed the first Chair. The department moved into the Mary Duke Biddle Music Building when it was completed in the 1970's. The bulk of the Dept. of Music records consist of publicity documents including programs, press releases, and calendars, for various Dept. of Music events. There are also documents regarding the renovation of the facilities, clippings, posters and general records for the department.

The bulk of the Dept. of Music records consist of publicity documents including programs, press releases, and calendars, for various Dept. of Music events. There are also documents regarding the renovation of the facilities, clippings, posters and general records for the department.

Collection

Dept. of Music sound recordings, 1956 - 1990 51 Linear Feet — 680 Items

In 1942, Duke University created the Department of Aesthetics, Art and Music. In 1960, the Department of Music formed as a separate department. Allan H. Bone, Duke professor from 1940 to 1983 and conductor of the Duke Symphony, was instrumental in the formation of the department. British composer Iain Hamilton was a faculty member for seventeen years. The Dept. of Music Sound Recordings collection contains audiotapes made between 1956 and 1990, primarily on 1/4 inch reel to reel tape, of the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, the Duke Glee Club, the Ciompi Quartet, and the Duke Collegium Musicum, as well as other recordings related to the faculty and students of the Duke University Department of Music. There are also audiocassettes and a few videotapes. Faculty members represented include Jane Hawkins, Penelope Jensen, Randall Love, Robert Parkins, Fred Raimi, Claudia Warburg, and Ruth Friedburg. Other featured musicians are Milton Babbitt, Barbara Lister-Sink, Claudia Bloom, Boaz Sharon, and Bruce Berg. English.

The Dept. of Music Sound Recordings collection contains audiotapes made between 1956 and 1990, primarily on 1/4 inch reel to reel tape, of the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, the Duke Glee Club, the Ciompi Quartet, and the Duke Collegium Musicum, as well as other recordings related to the faculty and students of the Duke University Department of Music. There are also audiocassettes and a few videotapes. Faculty members represented include Jane Hawkins, Penelope Jensen, Randall Love, Robert Parkins, Fred Raimi, Claudia Warburg, and Ruth Friedburg. Other featured musicians are Milton Babbitt, Barbara Lister-Sink, Claudia Bloom, Boaz Sharon, and Bruce Berg.

Collection

Eugenia Saville papers, circa 1950-1977 3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Eugenia Seville joined the faculty of the Duke University Music Department in 1947 as an instructor, and was eventually promoted to Assistant and Associate Professor in 1950 and 1960, respectively. She specialized in Italian sacred music, and directed the Duke Madrigal Singers from 1947 to 1972. She died in 2006. Contains course materials, music facsimiles, performance scores, materials related to the Duke Madrigal Singers, personal correspondence, and ephemera accumulated during Saville's research trips in the U.S. and Europe.

Contains materials from Saville's various courses taught at Duke. Also includes facsimiles of musical manuscripts, and vocal parts for music used as class examples and as part of the Madrigal Singers' performance repertoire. Collection also contains a wooden box of lantern slides and negatives, primarily of scenes from historical opera performances and opera houses. Removed rubber-bands, 1 folder of receipts and photocopy requests, 1 folder of student employment records, 1 folder of salary information and peripheral "to do" lists.

Collection

George "Jelly" Leftwich scrapbook, 1925-1931 3 Linear Feet — 4 folders Items

George "Jelly" Leftwich joined Duke University in 1926 as conductor of the Duke University Club Orchestra. He is best remembered for having written the words and music to Duke's fight song, "The Blue and White." The scrapbook contains newspaper clippings, photos, programs, invitations, tickets, booklets, advertisements, posters, and memorabilia related to the Duke University music department, as well as George "Jelly" Leftwich's personal photos and documents. The items date from 1925 to 1931.

Four folders contain newspaper clippings, photos, programs, invitations, tickets, booklets, advertisements, posters, and memorabilia related to the Duke University music department, as well as George "Jelly" Leftwich's personal photos and documents. The items date from 1925 to 1931, the bulk of which is from Leftwich's time as conductor of Duke University Club Orchestra. The folders combined consist of approximately 120 pages.

Collection

Humanities Council records, 1961 - 1979 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

The Humanities Council of Duke University was created in 1961 to give attention to various matters affecting the humanities departments as a whole, including the advancement of research, interdepartmental and inter-institutional programs, and support for various humanistic activities. The Humanities Council records consist of correspondence, memoranda, reports, minutes, clippings, and printed programs relating to planning, resource allocation, curriculum, and state of the humanities at Duke University from 1961 to 1979. Major subjects include graduate studies in anthropology, the Department of Music, the Museum of Art, medieval and renaissance studies, the American Comparative Literature Association, the Cooperative Program in the Humanities between Duke and the University of North Carolina, and the National Humanities Center. English.

The collection consists of records relating to planning, resource allocation, curriculum, and state of the humanities at the University as dealt with by the Committee. Correspondence, memoranda, reports (typed and annotated), minutes, clipping, charts, projections, and printed programs comprise the bulk of this collection. There exist some materials that are not created out of the general functioning of the committee. These materials, while not being direct results of committee work, help to better understand the functioning and role of the Committee in the life of the University. These materials are mainly dedications programs and leaflets, reports, booklets, and reports from outside bodies, such as the American Comparative Literature Association.

Collection

J. Benjamin Smith papers, 1965-1988 1.3 Linear Feet — 75 Items

J. Benjamin Smith was Duke Choral Director from 1968-1988. The collection includes clippings, black and white group photographs, correspondence, sheet music notebooks, "Fontainebleau Alumni Bulletin," and Smith's conductor's baton. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1988.

Collection includes clippings, black and white group photographs, correspondence, sheet music notebooks, "Fontainebleau Alumni Bulletin," and Smith's conductor's baton. The collection ranges in date from 1965-1988.

Collection

Johnny Long Orchestra Scrapbook, 1931-1990 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Johnny Long was a native of Newell, North Carolina and a student at Duke University from 1931 to 1935. In 1931, Long and ten other Duke freshmen formed the Duke Collegians Orchestra, later the Johnny Long Orchestra. Long and the Orchestra recorded several hits and performed at jazz venues around the country. Long continued to perform until his death in 1972. The scrapbook contains photographs, clippings, gig posters and advertisements, album liner notes, and other assorted memorabilia related to the Duke Collegians and the Johnny Long Orchestra and other big bands from North Carolina with inclusive dates 1931-1990.

The scrapbook, created by C. Shelby Dale (Duke '35), bass player and original member of the Orchestra, contains material pertaining to the career of Johnny Long with the Duke Collegians and the Johnny Long orchestra with the inclusive dates 1931 through 1973. Material includes photographs, clippings, gig posters and advertisements, album liner notes and other assorted memorabilia. Additional material also covers reunions of the surviving members of the Duke Collegians and the careers of other big bands and band leaders such as Les Brown and His Band of Renown (formerly the Duke Blue Devils), a 1936 graduate of Duke; Jelly Leftwich, the first Director of Duke's Department of Music and conductor of the Duke University Club Orchestra; Hal Kemp, leader of the Carolina Club Orchestra formed while a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Joseph Franklin "Sonny" Burke, a 1937 graduate of Duke and leader of the Duke Ambassadors.

Collection
Mildred Hendrix (1905-1985) was the Chapel Organist and University Organist at Duke University from 1944 to 1967 and Professor of Music from 1944 to 1969. The papers include correspondence, certificates, general subject files, recital materials, photographs, and other programs related to her career as an organist and organ instructor at the University. Major subjects in this collection are music for chapel services, organ instruction and performance, scholarly study of the organ, Duke University Chapel programming, and the Duke University Music Department. English.

Papers contain personal correspondence, correspondence with organ students concerning practice times and lesson arrangements, records of works played during sermons, clippings and biographical information on organists invited to perform at Duke, photographs, course syllabi, evaluation of potential students, and correspondence and conference material relating to professional organizations. Also contains bulletins and minutes for Music Department faculty meetings (ca. 1960-1967).

Collection
Robert Ward was a composer primarily of operas, instrumental works, and symphonic choral works. He won the 1962 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his opera, The Crucible, which remains his best-known work. Ward served as Chancellor of the North Carolina School of the Arts and as a faculty member at Columbia and Duke Universities. His papers span from his time as a student at the Eastman School of Music in the 1930s to his final years composing in 2012. They include scores, music sketches, recordings, libretto drafts, correspondence, scrapbooks, research and information files, writings and speeches by and about Ward, as well as concert programs, newspaper clippings, photographs, awards, and other materials that document his professional life and work as a composer.

The Robert Ward Papers have been divided into eight series: Biographical Materials, Correspondence, Operas, Instrumental Works, Vocal Works, Music Sketchbooks and Student Works, Music by Others, and Untitled Recordings. Biographical Materials consists of documents pertaining to Ward's work as a composer, including newspaper clippings, profiles, the composer's published writings and interviews, documents from the organizations with which he affiliated, events held in his honor, and certificates and awards he received. The Correspondence series primarily consists of professional communications between Robert Ward and several organizations. Ward's music has been divided into three series based on genre and arranged alphabetically by title of piece within each series: Operas, Instrumental Works, and Vocal Works. Materials for each composition may include scores, recordings, and publicity materials such as newspaper clippings, programs, and reviews. Music Sketchbooks and Student Works contains assorted untitled music sketches and sketchbooks by Ward, as well as manuscripts for some of his student works. Music by Others includes a variety of scores and recordings by other composers included in Ward's papers, the majority of which are recordings. Untitled Recordings comprises assorted media that contain no composition titles, although some recordings are labeled and dated as specific performances.