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Collection
Diane Weddington worked as a journalist and religion editor at the Contra Costa Times in the 1980s-1990s. She has also taught courses in journalism, public policy, new media, and ethics. Collection includes Weddington's published articles, research clippings, reporter notes, and other publications and materials from her journalism career, divinity school studies, background material for arts journalism, and materials documenting Weddington's educational and teaching careers. Topics represented include the gay and lesbian community in San Francisco, the ordination of women and gay clergy, the women's rights movement, domestic violence and child abuse, Alzheimer's Disease, and other miscellaneous subjects.

The collection includes a variety of materials, ranging from Weddington's published articles to clippings of other articles used in her research. The coverage of the homosexual community in and around San Francisco is represented in two series; the first being Coverage of Gay Clergy in the Church. This series includes legal proceedings by the Lutheran Church against gay clergy, as well as Weddington's own reporter notebooks from her time covering the subject. A second series, Coverage of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Communities, includes materials from Weddington's involvement in the National Lesbian and Gay Journalist Association and the Frameline film festival. Also included in this series are coverage of the blackballing of gay and lesbian news by the Contra Costa Times, business directories from San Francisco, local gay pride events, and mainstream coverage of gays and lesbians in America.

The series on Weddington's Research, Clippings, and Reporting from Various Projects includes materials from her religion beat at the Contra Costa Times, as well as other internal correspondence and clippings from her work at the newspaper. Subjects include general women's news, as well as articles on domestic violence and rape, child abuse, Satanism, recovered memory phenomena, and women's rights. Also included in this series are materials from Weddington's many projects, including the War Tax Resistance campaign, Diablo Valley study groups and clubs, Journalists Exchange on Aging, and gardening. Finally, this series includes materials from Weddington's coverage of the visit of Pope John Paul II to San Francisco in 1987.

Women in the Church includes materials from Weddington's own involvement in the women's ordination movement in the Episcopal Church, as well as her clippings of coverage regarding women and religion during the 1970s-1980s. Also related and included in this series are Weddington's materials from her time as a student at the Divinity School at Duke University in the 1970s.

Weddington's Published Articles and Reporter's Notes appear to date largely from 1986-1992, although many articles and most of her notes are undated. These clippings from the Contra Costa Times along with news wires reveal the breadth of Weddington's journalism, with topics ranging from the religion section to breaking news about traffic accidents. The materials are not sorted or arranged in any way. Along with clippings and reporter's notebook pages, the series also includes some correspondence from readers, internal Contra Costa Times photography requests, press releases, and other miscellaneous pages used by Weddington in her work.

Finally, the Correspondence series includes both electronic (print-outs) and postal correspondence. One part of the series consists of dot matrix printer printouts of internal communications between the staff and management of the Contra Costa Times. Weddington writes that this material documents the bias against gays and lesbians, as well as the regular workflow of the newspaper in terms of scheduling reporters, meeting deadlines, internal gossip, and so on. Another portion of the series contains letters, greeting cards, and other personal and professional correspondence. These have been arranged by year but not sorted further.

Accession (2014-0169) contains materials documenting Weddington's education and teaching careers, personal and professional correspondence, as well as materials relating to her work as a reporter, material related to her book on Alzheimer's disease, and work on the arts for the National Parks Service.

Included are materials from her grade school studies, undergraduate career at Duke University, work at Duke Divinity School, journalism coursework at the University of Missouri, and graduate studies at Berkeley in journalism and law. Teaching materials include courses taught at Contra Costa Community college on journalism and ethics. She has also taught couses on media and public policy. Also included are clippings and extensive research materials from her arts journalism in California, including work done for the Contra Costa Times.

Collection

Divinity School records, circa 1920-2021 156 Linear Feet — 3.2 Gigabytes

Online
Established in 1926, the Divinity School is one of 13 seminaries founded and supported by the United Methodist Church, and attracts students from around the nation and several different countries. The Divinity School has from its beginnings been ecumenical in aspiration, teaching, and practice. This collection contains information and materials documenting the operations of the Divinity School, including the activities of its deans, faculty, students, as well as various councils, committees and organizations within and associated with the school.

This collection contains information and materials documenting the operations of the Divinity School, including the activities of its deans, faculty, students, as well as various councils, committees and organizations within and associated with the school. Types of documents include correspondence, reports, convocations, information about the expansion and renovation of the school, strategic plans, minutes of various council, committee, and faculty meetings, photographs, sermons, bulletins, records of the theological society and other organizations within the school, financial records, lectures, publications, subject files, statistics, deans' files, academic programs, information about field education, alumni affairs, information about faculty members, documents relating to the early history of the Divinity School when it was known as the School of Religion, and other administrative files and records.

Collection
Online
Founded in 1926 as the first of the university's graduate professional schools, the Divinity School attracts students from around the nation and several different countries. One of 13 seminaries founded and supported by the United Methodist Church, the school has from its beginnings been ecumenical in aspiration, teaching, and practice. With many diverse theological perspectives, students find common ground through immersion in Scripture and the church's tradition for addressing the challenges of faith in today's world. Collection contains subject files relating to the Divinity School at Duke University. Some major topics include admissions, sermons, symposiums, continuing education, field education, student groups, and other topics. Video cassettes and audio cassettes are also present in the collection.
Collection

Duke Chapel records, 1920-[ongoing] 55.5 Linear Feet — 0.23 Gigabytes

Online
Collection contains records relating to the operations and activities of Duke Chapel and ranges in date from 1920-[ongoing]. Material includes administrative records, printed exercise programs and bulletins, transcripts of sermons, oversize material including marriage and baptismal registries, carillon and carillonneur material, miscellaneous clippings, press releases, and published material relating to Duke University and the Chapel. University Archives staff must be consulted in order to determine what material is covered by the administrative restriction.

Contains material pertaining to the operation and activities of the Duke University Chapel and ranges in date from 1920-[ongoing]. The records are arranged in nine series: administrative records; carillon/carilloneur; exercise programs and bulletins; sermons; registers and logbooks; general files; ministers, committees, and subject files; The Congregation at Duke Chapel newsletter; and Director of Chapel Music.

The Administrative records contain material created and accumulated by the Chapel Development Officer as well as the records of various committees including Chapel renovation and organ. Carillon material includes program logbooks created by the University Carillonneur and a special carillon program in honor of Terry Sanford. The exercise programs series is composed of printed programs from various services and exercises held in the Chapel: Sunday Service of Worship, Elementary Service, Faculty Service, Service for Elected Officials, various recitals, and Easter, Lenten, and Christmas services. The sermons series contains transcripts of sermons performed in the Chapel by various ministers, faculty, and guests of the University including William H. Willimon, James T. Cleland, Howard C. Wilkinson, and Waldo Beach. Registers and logbooks contains oversize bound volumes documenting Chapel attendance and weddings, baptisms, and funerals held in the Chapel. General files primarily consists of reference material used by Chapel staff: informal histories, information about chapel windows and exterior sculpture, informal patron inquiries, and various printed material. Major subjects include building and grounds, organ (Flentrop and Aeolian), tower and elevator, Chapel policies, weddings, and Chapel photo albums. Also present in the collection are programs for special services held in the Chapel observing V-E and V-J Days and the Chapel's dedication ceremony in 1935.

Collection

Elbert Russell papers, 1893 - 1968 1.3 Linear Feet — 1,000 Items

Elbert Russell served as a Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 until 1941. Personal and professional papers contain correspondence, manuscript materials, sermons, articles and short writings, and clippings. Major subjects include Duke University Divinity School, study and teaching of the Bible, history of Quakerism, study and teaching of Quakerism, fellowship, study and teaching of pacifism, and sermons. Materials range in date from 1893-1968. English.

Contains materials pertaining to the personal and professional work of Elbert Russell, Quaker historian, author, minister, and Dean of the Divinity School at Duke University from 1928 to 1941. In addition to his sermons, articles and books, Russell authored many poems and a play. Much of the correspondence in the collection includes references to pacifism and concerns sermons, teaching, preaching, Quakerism, and formal publication of his writings. Some clippings and correspondence in the collection date from after Russell's death and discuss his life and work. These most likely were collected by colleagues or family members. Materials range in date from 1893-1968.

Collection
This collection contains the papers of Dr. Fletcher Nelson, a Methodist minister and Assistant to the Dean of Development of the Duke Divinity School. It consists entirely of subject files and notes for the sermons Dr. Nelson gave during his career as a minister.

The collection consists of two series, the first of which consists of subject files containing publications related to topics on which Dr. Nelson preached. The second series consists of sermons Dr. Nelson wrote and gave while he was an active minister in Greensboro, Rutherfordton, Forest City, Morganton, and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Collection

Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995 112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items

Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

Collection

Franklin Simpson Hickman papers, 1930-1964 0.5 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Franklin Simpson Hickman served as a Professor in the Divinity School from 1927 until he retired in 1953. The collection contains sermons, bulletins, correspondence, and printed material authored by Hickman and ranges in date from 1930-1964.

Contains sermons, bulletins, correspondence, and printed material authored by Hickman. The collection ranges in date from 1930-1964.

Collection

Frederick Herzog papers, 1947-2011 (bulk 1947-1995) 32.4 Linear Feet — 24,300 Items

Frederick Herzog (1925-1995), former faculty member at the Duke Divinity School, was well known for his work on civil rights and liberation theology. The collection provides rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. Material includes audio cassettes of lectures, minutes from Herzog's lectures and classes, several English and German manuscripts of Herzog's publications, research files, photographs, significant correspondence, and speeches and lectures. Several materials dated after 1995 were contributed by Kristin Herzog, Frederick Herzog's wife.

The Frederick Herzog Papers span the years 1947-2011 with the bulk of the material spanning the years 1947-1995, the year of Herzog's death. These papers provide rich documentary evidence on the historical connections between religion, the Civil Rights Movement, and human rights. The material covers specific areas in which Herzog was involved such as the Civil Rights Movement in Durham and other parts of North Carolina, Durham and Duke University history, student unrest in the 1960s, and human rights issues in Peru in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The collection includes video and audiocassettes regarding Herzog's involvement in Peru and various lectures and classes on theology. His work as a professor at the Duke Divinity School and with various other theological and civil rights organizations is documented in the correspondence he sent to and received from various individuals and groups, as well as in the various committee documents and minutes that record his professional activity in the university. The bulk of material on courses taught and lectures given by Herzog, as well as his participation in both the student exchange program with the University of Bonn and in the Peru and Bolivia student exchange program, can be found in his notebooks and course materials. A large part of this collection is comprised of Herzog's research files on religion, civil rights, labor organizing, racial issues, and protest in North Carolina and nationally, including Herzog's own participation in civil disobedience. Noteable research projects include his work in Peru, his work with the United Church of Christ (UCC) and the Evangelical Church of the Union (EKU), and his work with black churches and theology. This collection also contains original annotated drafts of a variety of Herzog's publications, sermons, speeches and lectures.

Collection

Gilbert Theodore Rowe papers, 1878-1965 1 Linear Foot — 750 Items

Gilbert Theodore Rowe was born in Salisbury, NC on September 10, 1875. His father was Joseph Columbus Rowe, a Methodist minister. He received his A.B. and D.D. from Trinity College in 1895 and 1914, respectively. He earned his S.T.D. at Temple University in 1905 and was awarded a Litt.D. from Duke University in 1925. In 1928, he returned to Duke University as Professor and Chair of Christian Doctrine and remained until his retirement in 1949. The collection includes correspondence, clippings and Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, as well as material pertaining to his father, Joseph Columbus Rowe. The collection ranges in date from 1878-1965

Materials include Dr. Rowe's sermon notes, correspondence, and clippings. His sermon notes are largely handwritten and often appear on the back of other material, such as correspondence, letterhead, envelopes, church bulletins, and programs. The collection also includes some material concerning Dr. Rowe's father, Joseph Columbus Rowe (1848-1920). The collection ranges in dates from 1878-1965.