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Arts Council records, 1950 - 1970 0.5 Linear Feet — 500 Items

Formed around 1950, the Duke University Arts Council planned music and art events on Duke's campus, such as concerts and exhibits. It also created a lending library of musical recordings and art reproductions, and it produced a radio program, "Arts Council on the Air." After a period of inactivity, the Arts Council dissolved in 1970. Collection includes correspondence, financial papers, membership information, event announcements, minutes, reports, and other administrative papers. Major subjects include Duke University Woman's College and Woman's College Library, art appreciation, and faculty spouses. Materials range in date from 1950 to 1970; the bulk of the materials date from 1950 to 1959. English.

Collection includes correspondence, financial papers, membership information, event announcements, minutes, reports, and other administrative papers. Major subjects include Duke University Woman's College and Woman's College Library, art appreciation, and faculty spouses. Materials range in date from 1950 to 1970; the bulk of the materials date from 1950 to 1959.

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Bassett Residence Hall records, 1950-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 1500 Items

Completed and occupied in the spring of 1927, Bassett Hall was first known as Dormitory No. 4. Bassett Residence Hall was home to female undergraduate students from the 1930s through the early 1990s. Types of material included in this collection are: correspondence, constitutions, financial summaries, minutes, notes, newsletters, clippings, a biography, rules, and scrapbooks. Major subjects include: Duke University, Trinity College, Bassett Hall, living groups, and female students. Materials date from 1950-1979.

Contains minutes of house meetings, financial summaries, house notebooks, a questionnaire, materials for new students, newsletters, general rules, and scrapbooks pertaining to the undergraduate female residents of Bassett Residence Hall at Duke University from 1950-1979.

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Charles E. Jordan (1901-1974) served Duke as Assistant Secretary from 1925 to 1941, as Secretary from 1941 to 1957, as Chairman of the Athletic council from 1949 to 1963, and as Vice President for University Relations from 1946 to 1966. He was also active in community organizations, including the Durham County and North Carolina Boards of Education and various Methodist Church organizations. Jordan retired from Duke in 1966. The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina. English.

The collection includes correspondence, subject files, audiotape, and other records relating to administrative and athletic matters at Duke University. Major subjects include scholarships, public relations, intercollegiate athletics (NCAA, ACC, Southern Conference, Duke Athletic Council, and Duke Athletic Association), the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship Program, the Woman's College, and university publications. There are also materials relating to the proceedings of the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church and to educational matters in Durham and North Carolina.

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Elizabeth Mapes attended Duke University from 1937-1941 and was active in social and campus events, including Parapsychology Laboratory experiments and the Woman's College orchestra. The collection includes one large scrapbook containing programs, invitations, cards, and memorabilia, as well as several small files of photographs and clippings.

The collection contains a scrapbook Elizabeth Mapes kept of her time at Duke University as well as photographs, clippings, and other materials from her activities at Duke. The scrapbook includes programs for sporting events and various performances, tickets, meal ticket books, telegrams, cards, invitations, clippings, a corsage, a cigar, and the remains of a tobacco leaf. Photographs are of the Duke campus and other students. Clippings and correspondence include descriptions of Elizabeth Mapes' activities in Grand Rapids, MI, as well as Durham, NC; notes and correspondence related to her participation in Parapsychology Lab experiments; registration for classes and campus activities; and a copy of her certification as a Private Pilot.

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Eula Wake was a 1929 graduate of the Woman's College of Duke University. Collection contains photographic prints taken at Class of 1929 reunions in 1984, 1986-87, and 1989.

Collection contains photographs of various members of the Class of 1929 at various reunions in 1984, 1986-87, and 1989. Individuals are identified on the back of most photographs. Notable individuals include Duke University President Terry Sanford.

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Margaret Bennett was a 1930 graduate of the Woman's College of Duke University and involved with numerous student groups and organizations including the Student Government Council. Album contains photographic prints and negatives of scenes of student life in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

Album contains photographs that document student life in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Photographs include formal portraits, candid snapshots taken on what is today East Campus, and baseball players in uniform.

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Mary Robinson papers, 1948-2010 (bulk 1985-2000) 0.5 Linear Feet — 400 Items

Mary Robinson was a 1949 graduate of the Woman's College at Duke University. Robinson was also member of the White Duchy, the women's equivalent of the Red Friars honorary society. Collection contains material pertaining to the White Duchy and her 1949 classmate and fellow White Duchy member, Nancy Hanks, eventual head of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Council on the Arts, 1969-1977.

Contains material pertaining to the Order of the White Duchy and Nancy Hanks. Materials present include correspondence between Mary Robinson and Nancy Hanks, rituals surrounding the White Duchy; the Lucky Number, the newsletter of the White Duchy; clippings concerning the death of Nancy Hanks; the creation of the Nancy Hanks Center; and color photographs and slides documenting reunions, the Cashiers, North Carolina home of Nancy Hanks, and bequests to the Museum of Art from the estate of Hanks.

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Maude Brown scrapbook, 1924-1937 1.3 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Maude Brown attended Trinity College in Durham, NC from 1924-1926, before transferring to UNC-Chapel Hill. She remained active in Duke's campus life through 1928. The scrapbook includes clippings, photos and memorabilia related to social and academic life at Duke, the Y.W.C.A., May Day celebrations, and occasional trips. The scrapbook ranges in date from 1924-1937.

Contains photographs, clippings from the Chanticleer, autograph pages, correspondence, event programs, May Day and Y.W.C.A. memorabilia, sports schedules, class schedules, holiday cards, news clippings, postcards and photos from trips to Chicago and Virginia. Two non-University programs from the 1930s appear towards the end of the book. The scrapbook ranges in date from 1924-1937.

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The Order of the White Duchy was a secret women's honorary at Duke University. The group was formed in May 1925 by the Order of the Red Friars, a secret men's honorary, to recognize members of the Woman's College of Duke University. The members of the Order of the White Duchy voluntarily disbanded the organization in 1968. Records include constitution, initiation ritual, minutes, correspondence, photographs, membership and alumnae lists, financial records, clippings, issues of the Lucky Number alumnae newsletter, and two scrapbooks. Major subjects within the collection are collaboration between student leaders and college administration and student opinions concerning sororities, social standards, and the honor code. Prominent members include Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, Margaret Taylor Smith, Elizabeth Hanford Dole, Dorothy Newsom Rankin, and Dorothy Battle Rankin. English.

These records were created by the Order of the White Duchy in the course of 43 years of activities as a secret women's honorary at Duke University. Material is present for the years 1925 to 1968, although it is most copious in the 1950s and early 1960s, and consists chiefly of minutes and scrapbooks. There are no minutes for the years 1960-1961, 1961-1962, or 1964-1968. Records of any sort for the years 1964-1968 are limited to "Lucky Number" alumnae newsletters, some correspondence, and a study abroad pamphlet in the reference series. Physical types of materials include the constitution, minutes, correspondence, photographs, membership and alumnae lists, a cloth-bound volume of financial records, alumnae newsletters, clippings, reports, pamphlets, and two large scrapbooks. The scrapbook materials consist of photographs, correspondence, clippings, and one artifact, a fabric crown belonging to Mary (Eskridge) King, class of 1925 and founding member.

The history and activities of the order were kept secret from the student body and much of the faculty and administration. A history, copy of the constitution, and the initiation ritual are preserved in the order's records. The minutes detail the operations and projects of the Duchy, and also contain information on student life and opinion. Financial records show the expenditures of the order for the given years. Correspondence relates mainly to Homecoming Breakfasts, although there is some important information related to integration, and to alumnae post-graduation activities and life. White Duchy Organization records include the "Lucky Number" alumnae newsletter and existed mainly to keep members informed of campus activities of current members and of alumnae doings. Project folders relate to undertakings of the order that may or may not be mentioned in the minutes. Reference folders contain materials not produced by White Duchy, but which its members either found interesting or useful in their other activities, or which they felt White Duchy should be acquainted with. The scrapbooks contain information about members' activities during the year they were active, and also updates about work and family life after graduation. The scrapbooks are divided by school year, each member having a page for donated items, letters, and photographs.

White Duchy worked within student activities and government to influence policies and bring about campus improvements. They seem to have been fairly important to Deans Alice Baldwin and Florence Brinkley of the Woman's College as a means of discovering and influencing student opinion. White Duchy met and communicated over the years with many university administrative officials such as Herbert Herring, Alan Manchester, Mary Ellen Huckabee, Mary Grace Wilson, Anne Garrard, Robert Flowers, William Allen Tyree, Douglas Knight, Hollis Edens, and Paul Gross. One of the research strengths of this collection is the evidence of interaction and in some cases collaboration between the leaders of the university and the leaders of the student body, and the opinions of both that can be found on issues such as integration and desegregation, sororities, social standards (student life regulations), overseas programs, and the honor code, among others. For material related to integration and desegregation see particularly Minutes 1962-1963, and Correspondence related to the "Lucky Number" of March 15, 1963. Duchy members were very involved in campus elections, and in some cases appear to have decided amongst themselves which girls should be appointed to certain positions or should run for a particular office. There is little evidence that the White Duchy and the Red Friars worked in concert on many issues, and interaction between these two groups seems mainly limited to social functions.

Members of White Duchy were student leaders and held leadership positions in the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA), Judicial Board, dormitories, Women's Student Government Association (WSGA), class offices, Social Standards Committee, the Chronicle, and so on, during their senior year. Members had been involved in student government and activities since their arrival on campus in such organizations as Freshman Advisory Council (FAC), Sandals and other honoraries, sororities, publications, and Hoof'n'Horn. Members of particular note are Mary (Biddle) Semans, class of 1939; Margaret (Taylor) Smith, class of 1947; and Elizabeth (Hanford) Dole, class of 1958. Dorothy (Newsom) Rankin of the class of 1933 was the first member to have a daughter honored by membership in the order: Dorothy Battle Rankin, class of 1959.

Achievements of White Duchy are the establishment of the senior women's honorary Phi Kappa Delta in 1944-1945; helping to establish a campus and university honor code; organization of a White Duchy alumnae group and newsletter; campus improvements such as paths, benches, restroom improvements, trashcans; improvement of East-West Campus relations; working for integration and desegregation particularly in 1962-1963; and influencing major student and to some extent university policies such as the cut system, drinking rules, sorority evaluations, "Who's Who", and Mortar Board honor society. The White Duchy was a very social organization and held many dinners, parties, and cabin weekends away both for themselves and for alumnae. The seven members of each year held an alumnae breakfast on every Homecoming Weekend, and stayed in touch with the majority of alumnae. The seven members of a given year tended to be close friends, and referred to each other as "ducks" or "ducklings" and to their secret campus office as "the pond." Evidence of daily student life and opinion is present throughout the minutes particularly, and is another area important for research.

White Duchy was voluntarily disbanded in 1968 because its then members objected to the secrecy and elitism of the organization. They felt it was no longer representative of campus leaders and was doing more harm than good due to its selective nature. The order has never been reestablished at Duke University. See article from the Chronicle of May 3, 1968 in History, 1925-1968, and also various discussions of the role of the order and problems of secrecy in the minutes of the 1950s and 1960s.

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Virginia Parrott collection, 1958-1962 0.5 Linear Feet — about 400 Items

Virginia Parrot was a 1962 graduate of the Woman's College and a member of Debate Council and the PreMed Society. Collection contains a disassembled scrapbook and assorted loose memorabilia reflecting student life at the Woman's College in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Collection contains a patent Duke scrapbook and additional assorted loose memorabilia. Materials present include a Class of 1962 ribbon, welcoming letters and printed matter from campus organizations to incoming students. Senders include the Judicial Board, the YWCA, and various sororities. Copies of the Cadueceus, the newsletter of the Duke PreMed Society, printed programs, and other material reflective of student life in the late 1950s and early 1960s is also present. Due to wear, items in scrapbook have been foldered in page order and the scrapbook pages discarded.