Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Friedman, Milton, 1912-2006 Remove constraint Names: Friedman, Milton, 1912-2006

Search Results

collection icon

Anna Schwartz papers, 1929-2012 23 Linear Feet — 0.08 Gigabytes — 17500 Items

Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research and collaborator with Milton Friedman on numerous works, including A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960. Schwartz also served as the executive director of the United States Gold Commission from 1981 to 1982. Collection consists largely of Schwartz's professional materials, including economics research and subject files on monetary policy, gold, the Federal Reserve, currency, and the 2008 Financial Crisis; collaborations with other economists; correspondence, largely professional but including some personal letters; Gold Commission materials from the 1980s; Shadow Open Market Committee materials; and writings, including lectures and articles by Schwartz. Another significant part of the collection is the Milton Friedman series, which includes correspondence, writings, and other materials relating to Friedman and his work.

The Anna Schwartz Papers consists largely of Schwartz's professional materials and has been divided into 9 series and 1 file: Correspondence, Personal Materials, Conferences, Subject and Research Files, Writings, Gold Commission, Shadow Open Market Committee, Milton Friedman Materials, Writings by Others, and Electronic Materials.

Schwartz's Correspondence ranges from her college years through 2012, with the majority of material dating from the 2000s. Correspondence has been arranged chronologically and largely reflects Schwartz's research interests and collaborations with other economists. Particularly in her later years, Schwartz saved various email forwards and printouts on news and economics sent from her correspondents, and those materials are also kept in the Correspondence series. Milton Friedman's correspondence is held in the Milton Friedman Series.

Another significant portion of the collection is Schwartz's Subject and Research Files, which include materials on economics, monetary policy, banking, various countries, the Federal Reserve and its many activities, foreign exchange rates and intervention, currency, and many other miscellaneous topics. This series has been arranged alphabetically and has overlaps with other series in the collection, including Schwartz's Writings and Correspondence series.

The majority of Schwartz's Writings series related to various lectures and articles by Schwartz, although the series does contain some drafts and edited works from Schwartz's books as well as accompanying material such as appendices or editor correspondence. It has been arranged chronologically, with Schwartz's book reviews consolidated at the beginning of the series. Writings by Friedman, including collaborations between Friedman and Schwartz, are housed in the Milton Friedman Series.

Writings By Others is large series that includes drafts and final versions of articles collected or sent to Schwartz by colleagues. Most of these relate to Schwartz's research interests. This series also includes reader reports by Schwartz for various articles. It has been arranged alphabetically by author.

Three series reflect Schwartz's professional service. The Conferences Series reflects Schwartz's attendance and involvement in various economic conferences throughout her career. It is arranged alphabetically by conference. The Shadow Open Market Committee Series is a small series reflecting her service on the committee in the 2000s. It includes meeting materials as well as papers presented by Schwartz and other committee members. The Gold Commission Series encompasses materials from Schwartz's service as executive director of the Gold Commission from 1981 to 1982, and includes reports and research materials on gold and the gold standard; drafts, comments, and copies of the final report; and correspondence from the committee and the general public on issues regarding gold.

The Milton Friedman Materials Series includes all materials in the Schwartz Papers that relate to Milton Friedman and Schwartz's work with him, including joint writings and collaborations. Correspondence from Friedman is housed in this series. It also includes a large number of Friedman's writings, such as his columns for Newsweek and Wall Street Journal, and articles and talks by Friedman that Schwartz collected over the years. Some of these were drafts or working papers sent to Schwartz by Friedman for comments. Another portion of the series is the Writings About Friedman sub-series, which includes news clippings, essays, Nobel Prize coverage, and obituaries and memorials.

The Personal Materials Series includes Schwartz's Barnard College materials, interviews and clippings about Schwartz, versions of her curriculum vitae, and her date books from the 1950s through the 2000s.

The Electronic Materials File includes files received from Schwartz's office at the National Bureau of Economic Research office in New York City. The electronic materials cover professional and personal papers of Anna Schwartz, including correspondence, conference files, research files, writing drafts, writings, newspaper clippings, photos, and her bio/CV.

collection icon

Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

collection icon
Edward H. Chamberlin (1899-1967) was an economist and professor at Harvard University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, and items of a personal nature.

The Edward H. Chamberlin papers document his career as an economist and professor. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on topics such as monopolistic competition, market structure, pricing behavior, economies of scale, and collective bargaining, among others. The collection also documents his correspondence with prominent economists and individuals such as Marice Allais, Luigi Einaudi, Dwight Eisenhower, Howard S. Ellis, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Gottfried Haberler, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, Friedrich A. Hayek, Richard Kahn, Nicholas Kaldor, Frank Knight, Emil Lederer, Wassily Leontief, Abba Lerner, Gertrud Lovasy, Fritz Machlup, Hans Neisser, J. F. Normano, Francois Perroux, Dennis H. Robertson, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Thomas Schelling, Robert Schuman, Joseph Schumpeter, Ben Seligman, George Stigler, Frank Taussig, Gerhard Tintner, Jaroslav Vanek, Jacob Viner, and many others.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Chamberlin's roles in the American Economic Association, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Council of Economic Advisers, and the Rockefeller Foundation project to aid refugee scholars fleeing Europe during the 1930s; his editorship of the Quarterly Journal of Economics; his speaking engagements; expert testimony in legal proceedings and before houses of the United States Congress; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Harvard. The collection also contains personal artifacts documenting Chamberlin's service in the National Guard during World War 1, his service as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War 2, as well as awards and honorary degrees.

collection icon
Martin Shubik is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Seymour H. Knox Professor of Mathematical Institutional Economics at Yale University and the Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics. The Martin Shubik Papers span the years 1938 through 2017, and consist of his correspondence, research, writings, and his collaborations and professional affiliations.

The Martin Shubik Papers document his career as an economist. This collection provides an overview of his professional activities, particularly his research and writings on general equilibrium, game theory, the core, oligopoly and market structure, defense and war game analysis, nuclear deterrence, behavior and risk, financial institutions, and money.

The collection also documents his collaborations and communications with prominent economists, including Kenneth Arrow, Gerard Debreu, Milton Friedman, Oskar Morgenstern, John Nash, Paul Samuelson, Herbert Scarf, Lloyd Shapley, and others.

Along with his own scholarship and writings, the collection documents Shubik's time at IBM, his consultancy work for the RAND Corporation, expert witness testimony, his role as a conference organizer and participant, and other professional activities; and his departmental roles, committee work, and teaching contributions at Yale University.

collection icon

Paul A. Samuelson papers, 1933-2010 and undated 119 Linear Feet — Approx. 88,950 Items

online icon
Paul A. Samuelson was a Nobel Prize-winning economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Paul Samuelson papers span the years 1933 to 2010 and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Awards, Committees and Projects, Correspondence, Printed Materials, Speeches and Interviews, Teaching Materials, and Unpublished Writings. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, and many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Paul A. Samuelson Papers span the years 1933 to 2010, and cover nearly all aspects of his long career. Materials are arranged in the original order maintained by Samuelson, and include his professional correspondence files; unpublished writings, notes, drafts and fragments; audiovisual materials; documents regarding awards, including the Nobel Prize; files relating to various grants, committees, and projects; teaching materials from his years at MIT; files of speeches; and publication files, including professional and mainstream media articles. Significant correspondents include Milton Friedman, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, as well as many other notable economists, Nobel prize winners, politicians, and scientists. Material can also be found on economic programs at institutions such as MIT, where Samuelson established a renowned economics faculty. Researchers will find materials representing Samuelson's work on diverse topics of economic theory, including the history of economic thought (post-Keynesian economics, neoclassical economics, and thinkers such as Marx, Sraffa and Ricardo), financial economics, growth theory, international finance, inflation, stability, welfare economics, post-World War economic policies and stabilization, stochastic analysis, utility, monetary policy, Marxist economics, biological economics - including population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematical economics. Samuelson's insights on many of these subjects serve as organizational themes for large sections in the Unpublished Writings Series in the collection. Finally, the Samuelson Papers also document his strong contributions to the U.S. government, especially his work for the Federal Reserve, and to federally-funded projects, professional committees and boards, and organizations and societies, beginning in the 1940s and continuing throughout his career.

The Correspondence Series spans Samuelson's entire career, beginning in the 1930s. It consists mainly of professional exchanges with his colleagues in the U.S. and other countries. There are also files of correspondence with a wide variety of political and academic figures, presses, and media organizations. There is frequent correspondence with President Kennedy, for whom he was an economic advisor. Besides the named folders that represent notable economists such as Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Franco Modigliani, Don Patinkin, and Robert Solow, there are general correspondence folders in which a variety of documents are chronologically arranged. There is also a large group of files relating to the publication of his textbooks. Additional correspondence can be found in almost all the other series. A more detailed documentation of the Correspondence Series and its correspondents can be found in the series description.

A large series of Unpublished Writings contains many folders of unpublished articles, extensive research notes, jotted-down insights, and other fragmentary writings. The earliest pieces appear to be a typescript of Samuelson's 1933 diary and writings on collective bargaining (1933-1934). The wide range of topics in economic theory as well as the history of economics reflects Samuelson's interests over many decades, beginning with his work on Marx and the Transformation Problem, and later on, focusing more specifically on financial economics. The unpublished writings also reveal that he also wrote extensively on population and gender studies, thermodynamics, and mathematics.

The equally large Printed Materials Series houses a nearly complete collection of Samuelson's published articles in addition to a few of his monographs. In some cases, article folders include extensive correspondence between Samuelson and his editors and publishers. There is a complete list of Samuelson's publications available to researchers in the library, but not every publication listed is present in the collection. Located in this series is a copy of the thesis that Samuelson wrote while he was at Harvard, which in 1947 was published as the well-known Foundations of Economic Analysis. Also present in this series are the many columns and articles he wrote for Newsweek in the 1960s and 1970s.

Other aspects of Samuelson's career can be found in course files which form the Teaching Materials Series, most of which contain reading lists and syllabi, and in the Committees and Projects Series, which contains information on his many consultancy roles, grant-funded projects, and professional service. Examples include projects for the Radiation Laboratory and the Rand Corporation, and contributions to government agencies such as the U.S. War Production Board and the Federal Reserve Board, as well as academic organizations such as the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science and the Econometric Society.

The smallest series of the collection, the Awards Series contains materials relating to Samuelson's Nobel Prize in Economics in 1970 and his Medal of Science award in 1996. Files contain congratulatory letters and telegrams, and his outgoing correspondence to subsequent Nobel Prize winners. In contrast to this small series, the large Speeches and Interviews Series houses paper drafts or transcripts of nearly all of Samuelson's public presentations, amounting to over 400 lectures, speeches, and interviews. Some of these can also be found on recorded media in the Audiovisual Series.

The Audiovisual Materials Series features 320 cassettes from the commercially produced "Economics Cassettes Series," a set of interviews with Milton Friedman and Paul Samuelson on economics issues of the times. There are also a few tapes and cassettes of lectures and speeches by Samuelson. Items related to the topics and events represented in this series are also found in the Teaching Materials, Speeches and Interviews, and Awards Series. There is a DVD recording of the 2010 MIT memorial service which provides many images of Samuelson taken throughout his life, filling in for the absence of photographs in the collection. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; listening or viewing copies may need to be made by staff for access. Please contact Research Services before coming to use this series.

collection icon

Robert W. Clower papers, 1920s-2000 and undated 20 Linear Feet — 11,250 items

The papers of economist Robert Clower consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

The Robert Clower Papers consist of professional correspondence, writings, teaching materials, subject files, and some personal and legal materials from Clower's career, which stretched from 1949 until 1999. Clower's correspondence includes many prominent names of 20th century economics: Milton Friedman, John R. Hicks, Peter Howitt, Arjo Klamer, David Laidler, Axel Leijonhufvud, Don Patinkin, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, and others. Duke University faculty are represented in the Clower papers by Craufurd Goodwin, Neil DeMarchi, and Roy Weintraub. Also included are: Moses Abramowitz, Jess Benhabib, Clive Bull, David Colander, Paul Davidson, Frank Hahn, John Haltiwanger, Tom Hazlett, Roger Kormendi, Larry Kotlikoff, Robert Solow, and Sir Alan Walters. The Correspondence Series also includes a subseries of recommendation files. The collection also includes files of Clower's writings, ranging from notes and fragments to drafts and copies of published articles. Writings date from the 1950s through the 1990s. Topics covered in the collection include monetary theory, price theory, price determination, employment, banking, disequilibrium, stock-flow analysis, Keynesian economics/macroeconomics, Say's Law, and mathematical economics. The collection does not contain a complete set of drafts of Clower's writings. Many of the writings are untitled typescripts and fragments of notes.

The collection includes writings from Clower's father, F.W. (Fay Walter) Clower, also an economist; two copies of John Maynard Keynes's The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money, annotated by Clower; 5 cassette tapes with dictated letters; teaching materials from several economics classes taught by Clower throughout his career; and legal transcripts of 1979 court cases and hearings in which Clower testified.

collection icon
Thomas Mayer was an American economist (1927-2015) known for his work in economic methodology and monetary policy. His papers include published works and drafts of his writings and research and a small amount of correspondence between him and other economists. A portion of this collection is born-digital material, which is not yet available for research.

The papers held in this collection consist largely of Mayer's writings, in both final and draft form, which span his professional career from the 1950s until the 2010s. There is a small amount of printed correspondence, including notable economists Milton Friedman, Roger Backhouse, and others. The bulk of the collection consists of born-digital materials, which contain both electronic drafts and email correspondence. As of January 2017, this material is not yet available for research. Contact Research Services with questions about accessing that portion of the collection.

collection icon

William J. Baumol Papers, 1928-2013 127 Linear Feet — 5.74 Gigabytes

William J. Baumol (1922-2017) was an economist and worked as a professor of economics at Princeton University and New York University. This collection consists of his correspondence, research, writings, his collaborations and professional affiliations, and his work as a painter and sculptor.

The William Baumol papers document his career as an economist and artist. The collection provides an overview of his professional activities, including his research on the cost disease, unbalanced growth, productivity growth, entrepreneurship, increasing returns and international trade, anti-trust policy, contestable markets, market structure, macroeconomic theory, and interest rate and monetary theory, among other topics. Baumol's research and writings on the economics of the arts, undertaken and co-authored with his wife Hilda, are included in the collection.

The collection also documents his collaboration and communication with prominent economists such as Maurice Allais, Gary Becker, Alan Blinder, George Dantzig, Robert Dorfman, Milton Friedman, John Kenneth Galbraith, Ralph Gomory, Frank Hahn, Roy Harrod, John Hicks, Ursula Hicks, Samuel Hollander, Nicholas Kaldor, Harold Kuhn, Abba Lerner, Jacob Marschak, Don Patinkin, Lionel Robbins, Joan Robinson, Paul Samuelson, Ralph Turvey, Jacob Viner, and Edward Wolff, among others. Of note is Baumol's longtime collaboration with, and extensive support received from, Sue Anne Batey Blackman.

Along with his scholarship and writings, the collection documents Baumol's leadership roles at the Berkley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics at New York University, as well as his extensive expert witness and consulting activities for the Federal Communications Commission, Federal Trade Commission, the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Joint Economic Committee, and the Senate Judiciary Committee, among others. Baumol's consulting was often done through the companies Alderson and Sessions, Mathematica, and Consultants in Industry Economics. His notable expert witness testimonies revolved around regulation in telecommunications (particularly the ATT monopoly), airline ticket prices and sales practices, pricing of railroad freight shipping, and other topics.

Materials from Baumol's teaching at Princeton and New York University, departmental, and committee work are included in the collection. The collection also contains samples of Baumol's artwork, including sketches and paintings.

collection icon
Economics author and professor at the University of Florida. Collection contains materials related to economist Milton Friedman. Included are lecture notes, notes on Free to Chose, photographs, and eight audiocassettes with transcriptions of discussions interviews conducted by Fraser.

Collection contains materials related to economist Milton Friedman. Included are lecture notes, notes on Free to Chose, photographs, and eight audiocassettes with transcriptions of discussions interviews conducted by Fraser.