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Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence were British socialist activists best known for their involvement with the suffragist movement. This collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards.

The collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards. The first card is headed "Votes for Women, The National Women's Social and Political Union, Greetings and Good Wishes for 1908," addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Grinling from Mr. and Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence. The second card, dated 1936-1937, has a tipped-in photograph of the Pethick-Lawrences, signed "with love from Fred and Emmeline." A typescript letter, on The National Women's Social and Political Union stationery, dated July 8, 1908, is signed by Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Mrs. Grinling, and asks to have her husband convey a resolution passed at a Woolich suffrage meeting to Prime Minister Asquith. Included is a typescript copy of the letter from Grinling to Asquith carrying out the request. A typescript note, dated September 22, 1922, signed Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence on her letterhead, declines subscribing to something sent to her by Mr. Grinling. A typescript note from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to C.H. Grinling, dated October 3, 1945, mentions a copy of a birthday telegram Grinling sent to Gandhi, who she describes as "one of the great moral and religious leaders of the present age ... his reputation and his influence will continue to grow for many years to come." A typescript note signed "Fred," dated July 9, 1945 on "The Rt. Hon. Lord Pethick-Lawrence of Peaslake" letterhead thanks C.H. Grinling for a letter of welcome.

The library also holds a number of individually cataloged printed materials owned by the Pethick-Lawrences.

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Fairbank Family papers, 1837-1971 4.8 Linear Feet — circa 3,600 Items

The Fairbank Family Papers consist almost exclusively of correspondence written between members of the Fairbank family and their religious associates. The letters, carried by steamer between India, America and other parts of the world, span the years 1837-1971, with the bulk occurring between 1905 and 1940. Earlier letters were sent by Samuel Bacon, Katie, and Emily Fairbank and Thomas Snell Smith to Samuel's brother and other relatives in the United States.

This collection is useful in providing a comprehensive view of the religious, educational, bureaucratic and financial aspects of mission work in an underdeveloped country. Since this is documented by letters written by the missionaries themselves, it provides personal insights into their daily life and work. The lives of women missionaries in particular are well-documented, since many of the correspondents were female. Despite the fact that the Fairbanks worked in India during a period of British occupation, involvement of the British government in mission activity is rarely noted in the correspondence.

A number of themes run consistently through all the correspondence. There is a great deal of family news, including accounts of trips ranging from ocean voyages to family visits and vacations in India and America. Births, deaths, weddings and illnesses are chronicled in detail. Letters also include descriptions of church and school activities, work-related trips, meetings, conferences, and visits by religious and government officials and missionaries from other parts of the world. There is occasional discussion of contemporary world events, such as World War I, the Great Depression, and the rise of Gandhi in India. Yearly letters from a missionary friend in Foochow, China relate the turbulent events and political climate there between 1911-1931 in detail, including the Foochow rebellion of 1911. Observations and anecdotes about the Indian people, their religion, food and way of life; discussion of the political and economical climate in India; and descriptions of the physical environment and climate are woven throughout, although they rarely dominate any one letter. Many letters were written in a round-robin format and passed through the hands of different family members. Most of the correspondence is one-sided, generated in India and sent to the United States.

According to background material found in the Printed material series, the Fairbanks worked as agents of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (A.B.C.F.M.), a religious organization that was later known as the United Church Board for World Ministries, and had its home offices in Massachusetts. The A.B.C.F.M. established a network of boarding schools, trade schools, hospitals and churches at its mission sites. Schools and hospitals were divided by gender into male and female units. The mission's major goals were to: increase the literacy of the Indian people, educate women, establish good health care practices, improve agricultural productivity, develop industry, raise the standard of living of the lower classes, and, ultimately, to train Indians to be their own Christian leaders in all of these areas. Involvement of Fairbank family members in all of these activities is documented in the Correspondence and Beals Family series. The American Marathi Mission, where most of the Fairbanks worked, was located in West Central India in an area which included Bombay, and eventually covered 80 villages within 500 square miles.

Most of the letters fall into two generational groupings: those of Samuel Bacon Fairbank and those of his children. These are contained in both the Correspondence and Beals Family series.

Samuel's letters, 1837-1898, were sent regularly to America. They include detailed accounts of his agricultural and teaching projects in and around Vadala, as well as descriptions of the Indian environment. He conducted experiments with agricultural methods and farm machinery to increase the productivity of the land and people, who were subject to frequent droughts and famine. He started a boarding school in Vadala and a higher school in Ahmednagar. He also taught the singing of hymns in Marathi, the dialect of India spoken in that region.

There are quite a few letters from Samuel's daughters, Katie and Emily, and his son-in-law, Thomas Snell Smith. They describe their activities as missionaries to friends and relatives in America. Katie, who left a teaching career in the United States, taught rug-weaving and lace making at a girls' school in Ahmednagar. Later, stationed at Wai, she gave religious counsel and led Bible readings for patients in the women's hospital. Emily ran a girls' boarding school in Ceylon, while Thomas helped administer the school system throughout the district, attending to a variety of religious, financial and educational duties.

Letters from Samuel's son, Henry Fairbank and Henry's wife, Mary ("Momo"), written from Ahmednagar, comprise the majority of correspondence during the period 1905-1926. They describe his work while serving as chairman of the Ahmednagar mission and pastor of the church, and in various other capacities for famine relief and religious leadership as needed. The first portion consists mainly of weekly letters sent to their children while attending school in America. Later letters are addressed collectively to other relatives in Illinois and Massachusetts. After Henry's death, Mary assumed the role of chief correspondent from Ahmednagar. She eventually became the head of the village schools and their teachers in the Ahmednagar District, but her letters focus more on family news than on meetings and professional activities.

From about 1926 until 1940, the majority of letters are round-robin notes from Edward Fairbank and his wife, Mary, in Vadala to relatives and friends in America. Much of the time he was away from home, touring in the villages of his district. He paid frequent visits to the Indian and American teachers and pastors who worked in the mission, hearing reports and offering consultation and guidance for the administration of churches and schools. He also had charge of a language school in Mahableshwar, where Americans were trained in the Marathi dialect. Mary was involved in orphan care and famine relief, as well as various religious and educational interests. She began a lace-making industry in Vadala for girls. These letters are written mostly by Edward. Letters from their son, Robert, who assisted Edward in these duties, become frequent in the late 1920s. There is very little correspondence after 1940.

The Beals Family series consists of accounts of mission work done by Rose and Lester in the hospital at Wai. There are also quite a few printed newsletters sent to patrons in America which include accounts of hospital activity and Indian life and culture. Rose had charge of health care for women and children at the hospital.

Scattered throughout the Correspondence series are handwritten letters from other family members and friends living in both India and America, mostly containing family news. Letters printed for distribution among patrons in America containing descriptions of mission activities and the development of new facilities can be found at regular intervals.

Related manuscript collections in the Rubenstein Library are the papers of E.Loleta Wood and the papers of Joseph L. Moulton, both of whom worked in the Ahmednagar District.

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Missionary of the Methodist Episcopal Church in India from 1930 to 1940, at Lal Bagh Ashram in Lucknow. Recalled to the United States in 1940 after participating in activities supporting Indian Indepedence and opposing India's forced participation in WWII as part of the British Empire. Collection comprises a telegram (8 Dec. 1939) to Smith from Jawaharlal Nehru inviting him to a meeting, an undated black-and-white photograph of that meeting or another Smith held with Nehru and others, a letter from Nehru regarding Smith's advancing in the United States the cause of India's independence (10 Jan. 1940) and commenting on imperialism, a letter from Rabindranath Tagore urging support of India's independence (16 Jan. 1940), and an undated booklet containing an"Homage" to Mahatma Gandhi following his death.

Collection comprises a telegram (8 Dec. 1939) to Smith from Jawaharlal Nehru inviting him to a meeting, an undated black-and-white photograph of that meeting or another Smith held with Nehru and others, a letter from Nehru regarding Smith's advancing in the United States the cause of India's independence (10 Jan. 1940) and commenting on imperialism, a letter from Rabindranath Tagore urging support of India's independence (16 Jan. 1940), and an undated booklet containing an"Homage" to Mahatma Gandhi following his death.

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Dr. Jim D. Hunt was a Professor of Ethics and Religion at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC for almost 30 years. He studied the philosophy of Mohandas K. Gandhi and published several authoritative books on Gandhi, satyagraha, civil rights and peace. The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Research/Subject Files series contains research materials on India and South Africa, writings about Mahatma Gandhi and Martin L. King, book reviews, manuscripts, subject files, photos, and academic papers by Dr. Hunt and others.

The Correspondence series includes personal and professional correspondence received and sent by Dr. Hunt throughout his adult life.

Most of the maps in the Maps series were drawn or collected by Jim Hunt. The bulk of the series was from either India or South Africa.

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Raymond E. Casper was a U.S. Army major stationed in Southeast Asia during late World War II. Collection includes slides, negatives, and prints of Southeast Asia, the majority of which appear to have been taken by Major Raymond E. Casper. The slides have not been sleeved, but each box is fairly well-labeled. Many of the prints are dated 1945-1946. The photographs are scenes of everyday life in rural and urban India. They include historical sites and palaces, archeological sites, temples, holy men, tribes, parades, farmers, beggars, snake charmers, and animals such as cows and monkeys. There is also a small number of photographs and slides of Hiroshima, Japan, following the atomic bomb in August 1945.

This collection consists of photographic slides, prints, and negatives, the majority of which apppear to have been taken by Casper during his time in Southeast Asia at the end of World War II. Slides and prints are open to research; the negatives are closed to use due to preservation concerns. However, prints of the collection's negatives are available in Folder 4 of Box 1.

There are over 1300 slides in this collection, the vast majority being from India. Some include captions, but there are very few dates. The collection includes both black-and-white and color slides. The black-and-white slides correspond to the collection's prints and negatives. The color slides, although they appear to be amateur photography, do not appear to have correlating prints. It is not clear if all slides were taken by Casper, or if some were acquired as souvenirs during or after his travels.

The photographic prints are entirely black-and-white photography, ranging in size between 2x3 to 5x7 inches. They are in good condition, many including Casper's captions with comments, locations, and dates for the image.

The images in the collection consist largely of scenes from rural and urban life in Southeast Asia in the mid-1940s. Locations represented include the Karachi Air Base in Pakistan; Lalmonirhat, Bangladesh; Agra, Cooch Behar (Koch Bihar), Calcutta, Hyderabad, and Delhi, India; and Hiroshima, Japan. Includes at least two photographs of Mohatma Gandhi. Other notable scenes include holy men and priests; Hindu iconography and gods; temples and historic sites, including the Taj Mahal and the Jain temple in Calcutta; and archeological sites. Street scenes of everyday people include images of beggars, a leper colony, street doctors and dentists, farmers, water-carriers, snake charmers, launderers, barbers, rickshaws, and policemen. Also includes images of military bases and soldiers, including many images of Casper. Practices that are heavily documented include burning ghats, fuel production from cow manure, and funeral rites. There is also a small amount of photographs from Hiroshima, Japan, showing the devestation of the city following the atomic bomb.

A small amount of slides are clearly from a different period of Casper's life. They are in color and have images of a family touring various landmarks in the Eastern United States, including Washington D.C., Luray Caverns, and other historic sites in Virginia. These images are undated.