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Arlin Turner papers, 1927-1980 15.6 Linear Feet — circa 9750 Items

The papers span Turner's career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. Comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature, including Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. There are also letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations, including the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association, Committee for American Studies, and the Associated Research Council. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature, including Southern literature, American humor, Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Washington Cable.

The Arlin Turner Papers, 1927-1980, span Turner's entire career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. The Turner Papers are comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature. The correspondence includes letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations to which many of these literary scholars belonged. These materials, in addition to the clippings, printed materials and other writings Turner collected, provide insight into the development of the profession of American literary scholarship in the 1920s and 1930s; demonstrate the major concerns, issues, conflicts, and interests of its practitioners over the following four decades; and record research advancements and contributions to scholarship on the literary figures of most interest to Turner. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files he collected, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature. Finally, this collection provides glimpses into Turner's personal career and scholarly thought through the writings which are included, both those he presented orally as speeches or lectures, or those he published as articles or books. The Turner Papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Course Materials, Organizations, Printed Material, and Writings and Speeches.

A student of the first generation of American literature scholars in the 1920s, Turner played an important role in the network of scholarly exchange that was vital to the emergence of the discipline in the decades following. Turner kept in contact with numerous colleagues in colleges and universities across the United States and throughout the world, including many former graduate students who later became influential literary scholars and critics themselves. The Correspondence Series, 1930-1980, documents Turner's role in this network of scholarly exchange. The Individuals Subseries, 1930-1980, includes Turner's most voluminous correspondents: American literature specialists and authors Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. The Publications Subseries, 1934-1979, contains portions of Turner's communications with editors, publishers, and presses primarily regarding article reviews or manuscript evaluations of others' work. This subseries also contains some information concerning Turner's own articles, manuscripts, and various published works. Correspondence, brochures, press releases, reports, and contractual information concerning Turner's speaking engagements or attendance at professional meetings is collected in the Conferences, Speeches, and Lectures Subseries, 1961-1978 (bulk 1961-1964). Miscellaneous materials comprised primarily of letters arranged by subject are assembled in the Other Correspondence Subseries, 1948-1979 and undated This subseries also contains research notes, memos, and printed material. These papers document Turner's visiting professor appointments and awards, as well as his interest in topics such as the Duke University Library, the Huntington Library, George W. Cable primary sources, and international scholars of American Literature.

The Course Materials Series, undated, is comprised of information Turner collected to aid in composing classroom lectures, and other teaching materials. He maintained an extensive set of files on American authors, which can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Author Subseries, undated Most files contain a brief biography of the author and list of his major compositions, but may also include copies of their works, a typescript of Turner's lecture on the author, and related materials such as clippings or Turner's handwritten research notes. Turner also collected files on genres of literature, delineated both by region, such as Louisiana or British literature, or by style, such as Short Stories or Recent Fiction. These can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Subject Subseries, undated The Class Files Subseries, undated, contains Turner's teaching materials including syllabi, quizes, and exams. These files pertain to courses Turner taught (or in a few early instances, took) in subjects including American Literature before the Civil War, Post-Civil War Literature, Hawthorne and Melville, American Humor, and Southern Literature. Specific course numbers and titles have been provided wherever possible.

Arlin Turner was an active leader and participant in many of the organizations associated with his profession and interests, which are chronicled in the Organizations Series, 1929-1979 (bulk 1936-1979). These scholarly groups developed policies, conducted studies, and otherwise governed the profession. Thus, Turner's influential positions in most of these associations render his thorough collection of organizational records both valuable and useful. Folders in this series primarily contain correspondence, minutes, memoranda, reports, and printed matter such as newsletters, brochures, and clippings. Most notable is Turner's work with the Modern Language Association (MLA), whose American Literature Section members are primarily responsible for the spread of American Studies programs across the globe. Turner's records also document his work with the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA), the American Studies Association (ASA), and the Southeastern American Studies Association (SEASA). This series likewise chronicles Turner's leadership roles in the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Turner was also a member of the Committee for American Studies, the advisory group for the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils' (CBC) Committee for International Exchange of Persons (CIEP). The Organizations Series also includes files on the selection of Fulbright Scholars that he collected as a member of that committee. In addition, Turner served as chairman of this committee during the period in which the "Loewenberg controversy" consumed the CIEP's affairs. When Prof. Bert J. Loewenberg was denied a Fulbright Award in 1959 despite the committee's recommendation, its members threatened to resign in protest against allegations that Loewenberg's past political activity was to blame. Thus, significant amounts of correspondence from fellow committee members Ray Billington, John Hope Franklin, Harvey Wish, and Charles Barker regarding the controversy is found in this series.

Arlin Turner accumulated a significant number of clippings, newsletters, pamphlets, reprints, and publications related to American Literature. These are collected in the Printed Material Series, undated Included in this series are materials from the Educational Testing Service (ETS), memorabilia from Turner's time at the University of Hull in England, literary magazines, and miscellaneous clippings primarily regarding Southern writers (especially North Carolina authors), William Faulkner, and the New Critics (a.k.a. The Fugitives).

The Writings and Speeches Series, 1938-1980 and undated (bulk 1964-1977), contains copies of Turner's significant oral presentations and other written work, both published and unpublished, in addition to some writings of other authors he accumulated. Files from Turner's speaking engagements include both correspondence and typed copies of his presentations. This series also contains unidentified speech notes and writings, in addition to a bound typescript with handwritten edits of Turner's Nathaniel Hawthorne: A biography . Writings about Turner, including obituaries, tributes, his curriculum vita and the like, are also found in the Writings and Speeches Series.

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The Baltimore Pathological Society was formed in May 1853 by physicians Francis Donaldson, Charles Frick, Thomas H. Buckler, Thomas F. Murdock, Christopher Johntson, William C. Van Bibber, David Steuart and others. The first meeting of the society was held on June 11, 1853. Collection contains two manuscript volumes kept by the secretary of the society that provide a detailed record of the society's proceedings. Volume 1, dated 1853 to 1858, includes a membership list of the organizing members of the society, minutes of the first meeting held on June 11, 1853, and minutes of 84 additional meetings held from 1853 to 1858. Volume 2, dated 1867 to 1872, includes meeting minutes, roll calls, and the society's constition and by-laws. Both volumes document the society's discussion of cases and diseases and methods of treatment as well as medical demonstrations given at meetings. It appears that the society was re-organized in 1867 after an initial period of activity in the 1850s.

Collection contains two manuscript volumes kept by the secretary of the society that provide a detailed record of the society's proceedings. Volume 1, dated 1853 to 1858, includes a membership list of the organizing members of the society, minutes of the first meeting held on June 11, 1853, and minutes of 84 additional meetings held from 1853 to 1858. Volume 2, dated 1867 to 1872, includes meeting minutes, roll calls, and the society's constition and by-laws. Both volumes document the society's discussion of cases and diseases and methods of treatment as well as medical demonstrations given at meetings. It appears that the society was re-organized in 1867 after an initial period of activity in the 1850s. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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Resident of Richmond, Va., socialist and grassroots political activist in his early life; founder of the Southern Electoral Reform League; later sided with conservatives such as Barry Goldwater and George Wallace. The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics, including segregationist platforms. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, the Virginia Electoral Reform League, and the United States Information Service. The papers include correspondence with a wide spectrum of national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

The David Gordon George Papers span the years 1919 to 1976, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1935 and 1965, and are organized into the Correspondence, Personal Files, Printed Materials and Writings, Photographic Materials, and Subject Files Series. The collection consists primarily of correspondence and files related to George's involvement in a variety of political and social movements, documenting his early involvement in grassroots socialist and leftist democratic organizing and electoral reform work, decades of involvement with national and regional labor organizations, and his late-life support of anti-communist and socially conservative politics. His complex views on the political and social status of African Americans in the South, particularly in Virginia, are documented in his writings and correspondence. Among the organizations well-represented in the collection are the Southern Electoral Reform League, founded by George primarily to campaign against poll taxes, and the United States Information Service. The papers include files of correspondence with a wide spectrum of prominent national political leaders, from Socialists (Norman Thomas and Victor Berger) to Democrats (Hubert Humphrey and Estes Kefauer) to Conservatives (George Wallace), as well as staff of diverse labor organizations and a number of Virginia politicians across a broad ideological spectrum. There are also several files of correspondence relating to George's business ventures in Mexico, particularly his interests and operations in mining in the Chihuahua region.

George's writings, including many editorials and letters to the editor, and correspondence reveal his complex and shifting allegiances to various reform organizations during particularly eventful decades for the labor movement in the U.S. His work for labor-related causes in different guises put him in at least tacit opposition to positions he had advocated earlier. He also offers often contradictory views on race, supporting local black politicians at one point but joining the segregationist Citizens Council later in his life. In addition, George's experiences during the McCarthy Era demonstrate the lasting professional consequences of the alleged Communist ties in his past.

Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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The purpose of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana is to collect materials concerning the history and literature of the Southern United States. Collection includes correspondence, annual reports, disbursements and other material.

Material includes correspondence, annual reports, disbursements, and other material such as acquisition cards related to the development of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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James Curry papers, 1856-1858 0.1 Linear Feet — 6 Items

James Curry was a book agent for Joseph Funk and Sons, in Nickell's Mill, Monroe County, Va. (now W.Va.) Collection includes five letters, dated 1856 May 17 to 1858 October 7, from publishers Joseph Funk and Sons, of Mountain Valley, Va., to their book agent, James Curry of Nickell's Mill, Monroe County, Va. The letters discuss supply and demand, cost, production, and shipment of the work Harmonia Sacra, a popular Mennonite hymnbook written in shape-note style. Specific subjects mentioned include the need for a new fount of type, competition with northern publishers, carelessness of the depot agents in Staunton, Va., and the continuation of James Curry's agency. Also included is a note written by Curry affirming his willingness to continue his agency and stating the terms of his agency.

Collection includes five letters, dated 1856 May 17 to 1858 October 7, from publishers Joseph Funk and Sons, of Mountain Valley, Va., to their book agent, James Curry of Nickell's Mill, Monroe County, Va. The letters discuss supply and demand, cost, production, and shipment of the work Harmonia Sacra, a popular Mennonite hymnbook written in shape-note style. Specific subjects mentioned include the need for a new fount of type, competition with northern publishers, carelessness of the depot agents in Staunton, Va., and the continuation of James Curry's agency. Also included is a note written by Curry affirming his willingness to continue his agency and stating the terms of his agency. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

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Bridge builder; resident of Staunton, Va. Collection comprises a photgraph album probably compiled by Hamrick, who built trestles and railroad bridges all over the South. Includes 339 photographs, including 333 black-and-white gelatin prints (possibly matte collodion prints), as well as 6 cyanotypes, primarily of concrete-and-metal bridges constructed in Mississippi, Louisiana, Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Alabama, as well as a few shots of construction sites in British Columbia. Many of the images, but not all, contain brief identifying markings made in pencil or pen on the surface of the photograph. Sizes range from 3"x2.5" to 4.5"x6.5, with several attempts by Hamrick to create "panoramic" views by pasting two images together. Large sections of the album are devoted to the Whitney and South Fork bridges in North Carolina, but topics generally include construction scenes in various stages of completion; work crews, engineers, and surveying teams; camps and homesteads used as residences, and family life there. The majority of the photographs date between 1903 and 1914, with only 3 shots dating from 1946. There are also images taken during excursions; for instance, to St. Augustine, Fla.; Mardi Gras in New Orleans (1906); and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis (1904). There are also unidentified groups of young people, including possibly a women's school, "Rockdale" (in Ga.?), as well as a few clearly marked images of parties and a football game at Virginia Polytechnical Institute.

Collection comprises a photgraph album probably compiled by Hamrick, who built trestles and railroad bridges all over the South. Includes 339 photographs, including 333 black-and-white gelatin prints (possibly matte collodion prints), as well as 6 cyanotypes, primarily of concrete-and-metal bridges constructed in Mississippi, Louisiana, Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Alabama, as well as a few shots of construction sites in British Columbia. Many of the images, but not all, contain brief identifying markings made in pencil or pen on the surface of the photograph. Sizes range from 3" x2.5" to 4.5" x6.5", with several attempts by Hamrick to create "panoramic" views by pasting two images together. Large sections of the album are devoted to the Whitney and South Fork bridges in North Carolina, but topics generally include construction scenes in various stages of completion; work crews, engineers, and surveying teams; camps and homesteads used as residences, and family life there. The majority of the photographs date between 1903 and 1914, with only 3 shots dating from 1946. There are also images taken during excursions; for instance, to St. Augustine, Fla.; Mardi Gras in New Orleans (1906); and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis (1904). There are also unidentified groups of young people, including possibly a women's school, "Rockdale" (in Ga.?), as well as a few clearly marked images of parties and a football game at Virginia Polytechnical Institute.

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The Koinonia Community was a Christian farm community founded in 1942 in Americus (Sumter Co.), Ga., by Clarence and Florence Jordan and Martin and Mabel England. Collection comprises one article (1953, reprinted from MOTIVE magazine by the Board of Education of the Methodist Church), as well as two memoranda soliciting support for the community as a result of violence directed toward it during the 1950s because of its interracial composition.

Collection comprises one article (1953, reprinted from MOTIVE magazine by the Board of Education of the Methodist Church), as well as two memoranda soliciting support for the community as a result of violence directed toward it during the 1950s because of its interracial composition.

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Twentieth-century secret fraternal group held to confine its membership to American-born white Protestant Christians. Collection includes a broad range of Ku Klux Klan pamphlets, flyers, and other ephemera regarding Klan membership, Anglo-American values, protests against African Americans, Communists, or non-Protestant people, and promotional Klan events. Early material highlights activities of the Women of the Klan in Pennsylvania during the 1920s, including their charity work and fundraising for the Klan Haven, an orphanage. This material also includes large panoramic photographs of 1920s Klan reunions. Later materials from the 1960s are largely from the Southeast and mid-Atlantic States, and include literature, flyers, and handouts on Klan history, segregation, school integration, Communism, Catholicism, and Judaism.

Collection includes printed materials, apologetics, membership solicitations, circulars, brochures, pamphlets, broadsides, periodicals, cards, ephemera, and realia. Items were produced and distributed by various chapters of the Ku Klux Klan, dispersed throughout the United States, but largely originating in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic region. The KKK Collection also includes several panoramic photographs, assorted issues of Klan and other hate-group serial titles, and audio materials.

Materials have been acquired from a variety of sources and over several decades. Most of the collection has been arranged according to the geographic origin of the materials. Different branches and factions of the Klan are represented, including the United Klans of America, Women of the Ku Klux Klan, the Invisible Empire of the KKK, the Mississippi Green Knights, and the Mississippi White Knights.

Notable items include: a petition for the incorporation of a Klan chapter in Fulton Co., Georgia, in 1916; panoramic photographs and a wallet with Klan membership cards from Charles D. Johnson, a Florida Klansman in the 1930s; 1920s order forms for Klan robes, fiery crosses, and other Klan administrative materials from the Women of the Klan; pamphlets, circulars, and other literature opposing the Civil Rights movement, desegregation, and school integration, collected in Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana in the 1960s; and recruitment flyers for rallies in Maryland, Ohio, and Pennsylvania during the 1980s.

Other items were first distributed during a talk by C. P. Ellis to freshmen students at a Duke University dormitory in 1969. Items include a 45-rpm sound disc with the songs "Flight NAACP 105" and "High ride"; a flyer regarding protests against the playing of the song "Dixie" at student events; a membership form for the North Carolina chapter; and printed items, including God is the Author of Segregation (1967) and issues of The Fiery Cross.

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Founded in 1937 in Clarkesville (Habersham Co.), Ga. by Morris Randolph Mitchell; took name from nearby Baptist Church; comprised of families and individuals who worked collectively on the dairy, agricultural, forestry, and woodworking projects which provided the economic underpinnings of the community; originally an economic cooperative, Macedonia later passed through two distinct phases before its demise in 1958; at end of WWII an infusion of former civilian public service men, including conscientious objectors who had served prison sentences, joined the cooperative bringing an emphasis on pacifism; last stages of cooperative lasted from 1953-1957 when members of group explored the possibility of merging with the religious community known as the Society of Brothers (Bruderhof); in 1958 Macedonia ceased to be a separate community and property was sold at public auction on June 27, 1958. Collection comprises 4 flyers regarding the various wooden block sets made by the community for children.

Collection comprises 4 flyers regarding the various wooden block sets made by the community for children.

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Marcy Randall papers, 1856-1890 0.25 Linear Feet — 60 Items

Marcy Randall (1798- ) was a farmer's wife living in Visalia and Grant's Lick, Campbell County, Kentucky during and after the American Civil War. This collection chiefly contains letters from Marcy Randall, Campbell County, Kentucky, to her brother, Allen Hawkins, in West Glocester, Rhode Island. The letters primarily refer to matters of health, family activities, and religion. Many of the letters dated during the 1860s include Randall's commentary about the Civil War. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

Collection chiefly contains letters from Marcy Randall of Visalia and Grant's Lick, Campbell County, Kentucky, to her brother, Allen Hawkins, in West Glocester, Rhode Island. The letters primarily refer to matters of health, family activities, and religion. Many of the letters dated during the 1860s include Randall's commentary about the Civil War. Of particular interest are Marcy's comments about her fear of enemy depredations, rising costs of goods, the effect of the draft, and slaves returning to their masters. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.