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Duke Union Community Television (Cable 13), Duke's student-run television station, grew out of Freewater Films' video programming group, following the purchase of a television camera. Cable 13 was the first student-owned and student-run television station in the country. Cable 13 became an official committee of the Duke University Union in 1976. It broadcasts on the Duke campus cable system. The collection consists of videocassettes and videotapes of events recorded at and around Duke between 1976 and 2009. It includes such figures as William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Nikki Giovanni, Juanita Kreps, Terry Sanford, Ralph Nader, and Elie Wiesel, as well as performances from Dance Black, the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, the Firesign Theatre, Jerry Garcia, and Hoof'n'Horn. Other events include men's and women's basketball, women's crew, football, soccer, men's and women's volleyball, and Joe College Weekend, as well as news and talk shows.

The collection consists of videocassettes and half-inch open reel videotapes of events recorded at and around Duke, as well as student-produced content, between 1976 and 2009. Interviewees and notable figures include William S. Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, Nikki Giovanni, Juanita Kreps, Joseph Kruzel, Henry Kyemba, Peter Orlovsky, Terry Sanford, Daniel Schorr, Ralph Nader, Elie Wiesel, and Dave Thomas. Performances include Dance Black, the Duke Symphony Orchestra, the Duke Wind Symphony, Hoof'n'Horn, the Firesign Theatre, Jerry Garcia, Lotte Goslar's Pantomime Circus, and Roger McGuinn and Thunderbyrd. Events include men's and women's basketball, women's crew, football, soccer, men's and women's volleyball, and Joe College Weekend. Also include are news, talk shows, panel discussions, and many other shows.

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Letters (128 items, 1972-1974) to Young from prospective contributors to The Male Muse, including W.H. Auden, William Barber, Victor Borsa, Bruce Boone, Jim Eggeling, Allen Ginsberg, and others. Although the majority of the letters deal specifically with possible poems for inclusion into the anthology, many of the writers touch on their lives as gay men and their opinions of gay literature. The letters contain many original autographs. The collection also includes a copy of the published book.

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Walter H. Smith donated this collection of Beat Literature. The majority relates to the career and life of Allen Ginsberg, a founding member of the Beat Generation. Other writers represented include Anne Waldman, Diane di Prima, and Anselm Hollo. Accessions (2009-0113) and (2009-0130) (200 items; 3.5 lin. ft.; dated 1959-2003) include books, compilations, journals, magazines, and other publications with works by and about Allen Ginsberg. Also included are posters and broadsides advertising events, readings, or publications by Ginsberg; many of these are signed. Accession (2010-0098) (25 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1950-2009) includes writings and some correspondence from Diane di Prima, Anselm Hollo, and Anne Waldman; also includes some Allen Ginsberg materials. Accession (2011-0045) (27 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2007) includes pamphlets and publications by Gary Snyder.

Accessions (2009-0113) and (2009-0130) (200 items; 3.5 lin. ft.; dated 1959-2003) include books, compilations, journals, magazines, and other publications with works by and about Allen Ginsberg. Also included are posters and broadsides advertising events, readings, or publications by Ginsberg; many of these are signed.

Accession (2010-0098) (25 items; 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1964-2009) includes publications and some correspondence from Beat Generation poets such as Anne Waldman, Diane di Prima, Anselm Hollo, and Allen Ginsberg. Includes signatures of Hollo and Waldman.

Accession (2011-0045) (27 items; 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2007) includes publications, pamphlets, and posters featuring works and readings by Gary Snyder.

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Weston La Barre papers, 1930-1996 31 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Weston La Barre (1911-1996) was an anthropology professor at Duke University from 1946 to 1977. Prior to coming to Duke, La Barre worked in military intelligence in the U.S. Navy during World War II. The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials. La Barre's professional interests included cultural anthropology, religion, psychodelic drugs such as peyote, and psychology. Major correspondents include George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. English.

The Weston La Barre Papers include correspondence, publications, lectures, committee materials, teaching materials, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks and other materials related to the personal life and professional career of anthropologist Weston La Barre. The collection is arranged into 8 series. The first series, Personal, contains materials related to La Barre's family, friends, education, and Navy career during World War II. The next series, Correspondence, contains extensive chronological files of letters to and from La Barre's colleagues and friends. Several correspondents were filed by name, including George Devereux, Allen Ginsberg, Alexander Morin, Richard Evans Schultes, and Howard Stein. The following series, Publications, includes articles and books that La Barre wrote during his long career. It also includes drafts, editing notes, correspondence, and other materials related to the writings. Next, Lectures and Addresses includes the text of many speeches La Barre made across the country, as well as materials related to the conferences and events at which La Barre spoke.

La Barre's participation in conferences, committees, editing projects, and research is documented in the Professional Activities series. The Duke University series contains teaching materials like tests, quizzes, and syllabi. It also contains administrative information from the Department of Anthropology, and a scrapbook and memoir by La Barre recalling the controversy over a possible Nixon Presidential Library at Duke. The next series, Audio Recordings, contains a small selection of speeches and music on anthropological subjects. Finally, the Scrapbooks series contains a number of scrapbooks documenting La Barre's travels in the Navy, on anthropological and research voyages, and for vacation. There are also a large number of scrapbooks in which La Barre appeared to collect clippings of anthropological or psychological interest.

For several of the series (including Correspondence, Publications, Lectures and Addresses, Professional Activities, and Duke University), La Barre annotated the folders with comments about the events, people, and places described within the documents. Because these folders were physically deteriorating, the comments have been photocopied and placed in the front of the corresponding file. La Barre also occasionally annotated individual items, apparently years after the documents were originally created.