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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Physician's account ledger and assorted papers from Dr. Charlotte Evans Page, a physician practicing in Lowell, Massachusetts, in the 1880s and 1890s.

Physician's account ledger with entries dating from 1884 through 1899, and miscellaneous correspondence and financial papers related to Page's family history and operations of her medical practice.

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Edmund Snare papers, 1836-1867 0.8 Linear Feet — 4 items

Edmund Snare was a physician and resident of Huntingdon (Huntingdon Co.), Pennsylvania. Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare.

Collection comprises a ledger (dated 1836-1867) and three documents, including a letter (1864 January 19) appointing Edmund Snare as an examining surgeon of the Pension Office; a printed document (dated 1864-1866) with a handwritten list of pensioners he examined; and a letter (July 1866) from Snare to pensioner John Horst requesting more details regarding his injury, with Horst's responses. The last portion of the ledger (approximately 53 pages) contains Snare's records regarding his examinations of soldiers, primarily from Pennsylvania regiments, who had been discharged for various injuries and diseases from both the Civil and Mexican wars. One soldier was from New York, one from Illinois, and one was an African American with the 32d Regt. U.S. Colored Troops. Entries recorded the soldier's name, home town, regiment and immediate commanding officer, as well as the attorney representing the soldier in his petition. Sometimes the battle in which the injury was received is mentioned, including Antietam, Gettysburg, and Cold Harbor; other notes mention men who were captured and sent to Confederate prisons, including Andersonville. Snare then provided a detailed medical description of the injury or wound and any resulting damage. Several of the men had contracted diseases while on duty, such as typhoid or tuberculosis, had sustained hernias or were sidelined by rheumatism, but most of the men suffered gunshot wounds or injuries from cannon fire. In the margins Snare recorded his estimates for awarding a pension, according to guidelines set by the Pension Office. Some of the soldiers were examined annually or biennially over the course of three years, to reassess their continued eligibility.

The ledger was initially used (118 pages) to record transactions for a mercantile business belonging to another Edmund Snare, presumably a relative of Dr. Snare. This Edmund Snare of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and New York, sold goods such as coffee, flour, wine, tea, dried fruit, and Cuban tobacco, among other items, and purchased goods from a variety of firms. Includes an alphabetical listing of his customers; along with records of expenditures, invoices, and sales; and tabulations of profits, primarily between May and July 1836. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection.

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History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s 50 Linear Feet — about 850 items

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Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects related to the history of medicine, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, urology, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models and figurines; and other objects such as apothecary jars, cupping glasses, infant feeders, a bas-relief memento mori, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes and stethoscopes, dating from the 17th to the 20th century. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection of historical medical instruments and artifacts, art objects, realia, and other three-dimensional objects, primarily originating from Europe and the United States, but including some artifacts from China and Japan. Ranging in age from the late 16th to the late 20th centuries, objects include physician's medical kits and pharmaceutical items (often in the original cases and bags); clinical equipment used in amputation, obstetrics, opthalmology, surgery, neurology, early electrical therapies, and in research and diagnostic settings; instructional objects such as anatomical models; and art objects such as apothecary jars, a bas-relief memento mori, a marble skull, and fetish figures. There are many models of microscopes, from a small monocular "flea glass" to mid-20th century models. Other early medical instruments and supplies include amputation saws, bleeding bowls, cupping glasses, hypodermic needles, infant and invalid feeders, lancets, opthalmoscopes, pill rollers, stethoscopes, syringes, and other items. A more unusual item - and one of the larger pieces - is an adult walker made of wood, dating perhaps to the 19th century or earlier.

There is also a large collection of early anatomical and diagnostic human models from China and continental Europe, in the shape of small, intricately detailed manikins. Most are made from ivory. Some feature removable anatomical parts, and female figures often include a removable fetus. There is also a model illustrating acupuncture points. Other instructional artifacts include glass slides used in medical school lectures.

Most of these objects were photographed by library staff; at a later time, digital images of almost all of the objects in the collection were added to the online Duke University Historical Images in Medicine database, linked in this collection guide. Many of the original black-and-white photographic prints are filed in the History of Medicine Picture File collection. See the Related Materials section in this collection guide for links to these resources.

Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Collection comprises postcards, posters, and ephemera related to the Japanese military, as well as propaganda, and patriotism in the country between 1910 and World War II. Includes a postcard with patriotic children (1910's), postcards relating to the 1933 Army anti-air raid drill in the Kanto region, a New Year's greeting card celebrating the Nagoya Pan-Peace Exposition from 1937, and an advertisement for Sin-Japanese war bonds. Items dating from the 1930s include a postcard encouraging the public to save for the war effort, a life insurance flyer, an advertising packet for a conscription insurance policy, a 1936 brochure issued by the South Manchuria Railway of the Fushun Colliery, and a drug advertising propoganda leaflet showing the battlefield and home front. Material related to World War II includes a bank account passbook, a postcard from Italy that glorifies Japan, postcards with songs from a cavalry division and the 16th Infantry division, a confectionery wrapper, a wrapper for a whiskey bottle, an anti-communist print, a brochure for the Dong Bain Dao Development Company in Manchuria, and 44 propaganda posters. Several of the postcards were used and contain messages.

Collection comprises postcards, posters, and ephemera related to the Japanese military, as well as propaganda, and patriotism in the country between 1910 and World War II. Includes a postcard with patriotic children (1910's), postcards relating to the 1933 Army anti-air raid drill in the Kanto region, a New Year's greeting card celebrating the Nagoya Pan-Peace Exposition from 1937, and an advertisement for Sin-Japanese war bonds. Items dating from the 1930s include a postcard encouraging the public to save for the war effort, a life insurance flyer, an advertising packet for a conscription insurance policy, a 1936 brochure issued by the South Manchuria Railway of the Fushun Colliery, and a drug advertising propoganda leaflet showing the battlefield and home front. Material related to World War II includes a bank account passbook, a postcard from Italy that glorifies Japan, postcards with songs from a cavalry division and the 16th Infantry division, a confectionery wrapper, a wrapper for a whiskey bottle, an anti-communist print, a brochure for the Dong Bain Dao Development Company in Manchuria, and 44 propaganda posters. Several of the postcards were used and contain messages.

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M. Almina Stratton was a student in the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia. She received her M.D. in the second class the college graduated in 1859. Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

Collection comprises manuscript notes (61 pages) maintained by M. Almina Stratton for her class in Materia Medica, entitled "Lectures on Materia Medica By Prof. Roerig, delivered in the Female Medical College In the session of 1858-9." Contains an additional 8 pages of her rules and advice for young ladies regarding gentlemen callers, proper behavior, and letter writing.

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Maria de Bruyn is a medical anthropologist who worked for non-profit organizations in The Netherlands and United States, as well as international non-governmental and United Nations agencies, in the field of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) with a special focus on HIV and AIDS and health-related human rights. She served on the Global Programme on AIDS Global Management Committee Task Force on HIV/AIDS Coordination as one of three nongovernmental organization (NGO) representatives; this Task Force contributed to establishing NGO participation in the governance of UNAIDS. She was also a co-founder of the ATHENA Network to advance gender equity and human rights in the global response to HIV and AIDS and worked with groups of women living with HIV on sexual and reproductive rights and advocacy. This collection includes de Bruyn's writings, work from her consultancies and other trainings and workshops, and her subject files on topics such as HIV/AIDS, sexual and reproductive health, human rights, condoms, discrimination, youth, sex work, and women's health issues. Subject files include brochures, ephemera, and artifacts such as condoms, buttons, and objects de Bruyn collected from her travels around the world. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection documents de Bruyn's scholarly writings, consulting work, collaboration with various global health and international policy organizations (including Ipas), and other contributions to the field of public and global health. Topics include sexual and reproductive rights, HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections, youth and adult sexual health education, human rights to healthcare, healthcare law and discrimination, condoms and contraception, and global health policies and advocacy. The collection also contains de Bruyn's extensive subject files, including artifacts and ephemera from her travels and career. The subject files are loosely arranged by geographic region, including samples of brochures, literature, flyers, and other items from the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin American countries. De Bruyn's files also include public health resources, research articles, published accounts and testimonies, and examples of condoms, lubricant, sexual health artifacts, buttons, and other collected ephemera and objects.

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Dr. Mary J. Scarlett was a Quaker, born in 1822 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. She devoted her early years to being a teacher in Chester County, Pennsylvania, then entered and graduated from the Woman's Medical College in 1857. In 1862, she became professor of anatomy at Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Collection contains seven letters (22 pages) M. J. Scarlett wrote between 1845-1864. Two letters were addressed to her sister, Elizabeth (1845, 1849), and five to her niece (1858, 1860, 1863, 1864). In the letters she discussed details of her life at the time, from the teaching of students to the choosing of proper fabric for sewing a dress, making a comfortable sitting room, or studying public health and hygiene. She also mentioned many family matters. She commented on her hopes for the abolition of slavery and the infighting among abolitionists at a recent national meeting, and noted her puzzlement that those Quakers who would quickly speak as abolitionists would not also speak up on issues of faith within the Society of Friends. During the Civil War, she described the effect of the draft in Philadelphia, recorded the general concern that the Army of the Potomac needed to be successful, and pointed to camps nearby as well as to funerals passing. Collection also includes an undated broadside for "An Introductory Lecture to a Course on Physiology" to be delivered by Scarlett. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections (Duke University), the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Norma Taylor Mitchell was an American History professor at Troy University in Alabama and a lay leader in the United Methodist Church. These materials document her research and teaching career, as well as her church leadership.

The collection contains material documenting Mitchell's dissertation research on the Virginia politician David Campbell (1779-1859). Boxes 2-5 consist entirely of information on loose index cards. These materials also document Mitchell's research on the enslaved women who lived on Campbell's estate in Abington, VA. The collection also contains materials related to Mitchell's research on the Alabama physician Louise Branscomb. There are materials documenting Mitchell's professional activities and teaching career at what was then known as Troy State University. Mitchell's extensive service work in the Methodist Church at the local, regional, and national levels is also documented.

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Paul Mushak was a professor, researcher, and internationally recognized expert in toxic metals and their effect on human health.

The first series, Writings by Mushak, contains works authored or co-authored by Paul Mushak. Much of it is related to the toxicity of lead and other heavy metals.

The second series, Other Writings, contains works authored by others. This series is divided in nine subseries by subject matter. Each subseries is organized alphabetically and then chronologically. These sub-series are as follows: Arsenic, Beryllium, Bunker Hill NPL Site, Butte-Silver Bow County, Coeur d'Alene Basin, Heavy Metals (Misc.), Lead, Mercury, and General Documents.