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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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Army Research Office--Durham (AROD) records, 1957-1982 2.7 Linear Feet — approx. 200 items

The Office of Ordnance Research (OOR), U.S. Army, a Class II military institution, established offices on the Duke University campus in June 1951. On January 16, 1961 the OOR ceased to exist and was instead re-designated as the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD) under the command of the Chief, Research and Development. The 1960s and 1970s saw a weakening in the working relationship between the military and the scientific communities. In the spring of 1975, ARO left the Duke campus and moved to the Research Triangle Park, ten miles southeast of Durham. Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

Collection contains materials pertaining to the mission and organization of the U.S. Army Office of Ordinance Research, the forerunner of the Army Research Office-Durham (AROD). Materials include summaries of the activities of the Duke/AROD coordination office for the fiscal years 1966, 1969-1971, and a scrapbook dated 1959. The scrapbook contains photographs of Duke officials, Ordnance office chiefs, various dedication events and ceremonies, event guest lists, official luncheons, and RTP exhibit, all from 1959. The materials in the collection span the years 1957-1982.

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Marcus E. Hobbs papers, 1935 - 1980 7.5 Linear Feet — 5000 Items

Marcus Edwin Hobbs, Duke University educator and administrator, served as Chair of the Chemistry Dept. (1951-1954), Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1954-1958), Dean of the University (1958), Vice Provost (1962-1963), and Provost (1969-1970), before his retirement in 1970 as Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus. Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham. English.

Collection includes correspondence and memoranda, research reports, financial papers, grant proposals, committee records, and other material. The bulk of the materials range in date from the 1960s to the 1980s. Subjects include the conflict of interest policy, the dedication of the Gross Chemistry Laboratory, development of sciences at the University, chemistry research in ordnance and tobacco, the Damon Runyan Memorial Fund for Cancer Research, the Research Triangle Institute, Paul M. Gross, long-range planning, the Office of Ordnance Research, and the Army Research Office, Durham.

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Contains the personal and professional records of Paul Magnus Gross, a Duke University administrator, researcher, educator, and scholar. Gross was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). The Paul M. Gross Chemistry Laboratory was named in his honor. Gross was also an independent consultant with the United States Army and various commercial companies. Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Major subjects include Duke University, the Graduate School, the Department of Chemistry, University Council, the Board of Trustees, University Research Council, Duke University administration, University Committee on Long-Range Planning, Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, study and teaching of physical sciences, military training, war education, munitions development, United States Navy, United States Army, Office of Ordnance Research, universities in the southern United States, and the Gross-Edens controversy. Major correspondents include J. Deryl Hart, Robert Lee Flowers, Douglas M. Knight, Marcus Hobbs, Charles E. Jordan, and Arthur Hollis Edens. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. English.

Contains the personal and professional papers of Paul M. Gross. Gross served as a leader of many national scientific organizations. At Duke University, he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1919-1920), William H. Pegram Professor of Chemistry (1920-1965), Chair of the Chemistry Department (1921-1948), Dean of the Graduate School (1947-1952), Dean of the University (1952-1958), and Vice-President in the Educational Division (1949-1960). Types of materials include correspondence, clippings, reports, research papers, meeting notes, conference materials, contracts, speeches, dedications, eulogies, lecture notes, financial information, postcards, and building plans. Materials range in date from 1935-1979. Box 43 was added to the finding aid 8 March 2007 and is unprocessed.