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Benjamin Franklin Fisher papers, 1963-2001, bulk 1967-2001 1.6 Linear Feet — circa 1006 Items

The papers of Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV, an American literature scholar, editor, and teacher, span the years 1963 to 2001, with the bulk dated from 1963 to 2001. The Fisher Papers consist of correspondence and printed materials that primarily document Fisher's and his Duke University advisors' educational and career trajectories. These materials also provide insight into various scholars' recent contributions to Poe studies, as well as information on the general activities of, and Fisher's leadership roles in, several of the professional organizations of which Fisher was a member. These organizations especially include those devoted to the study of Edgar Allan Poe.

The Correspondence Series, 1963-2001 (bulk 1967-2001) consists of letters between Fisher and other scholars of American literature from 1963 to 2001, with the bulk dated 1967-2001. Much of the correspondence mingles professional exchanges with personal inquiries and salutations. Included are many of the prominent names in Edgar Allan Poe scholarship, including Richard Benton, David K. Jackson, Burton Pollin, Richard Kopley, Alexander G. Rose, and G. R. "Dick" Thompson. The collection also contains Fisher's correspondence with Duke faculty members Arlin Turner, Clarence Gohdes, and Jay B. Hubbell, beginning in Fisher's graduate student years and continuing until their deaths. Much of Fisher's correspondence includes manuscript evaluations, both casually for colleagues and professionally for publishers or editors. Also included are Fisher's files regarding conferences, especially records of the Edgar Allan Poe Society's Annual Speakers Series, for which Fisher served as chairman. Much of the correspondence with individuals provides information on the activities of this and other organizations to which Fisher belonged, especially the Poe Studies Association. A significant portion of correspondence from 1999 to 2001 is print-outs of electronic mail.

The Printed Material Series, 1978-1982 includes a copy of the April/June 1978 issue of Serials Review, which features a history of American Literature, a journal published at Duke. The article praises AL's three editors Jay B. Hubbell, Arlin Turner, and Clarence Gohdes, who also served as Fisher's mentors at Duke. Tributes to Turner can also be found in the 1981 issue of South Atlantic Quarterly and in the first of two volumes of University of Mississippi Studies in English (USME) found in this collection. In addition to Fisher's tribute to Turner, the first volume of USME also contains Fisher's review of Turner's 1980 book Nathaniel Hawthorne: A Biography. Volume 3 (1982) of the UMSE is entitled "Poe-purri," and includes Fisher's essay "A Ten-Year Shelf of Poe Books." This series also includes two 1982 Edgar Allan Poe Society publications written by Alexander Rose, who had served as the organization's president from 1969-1976. The first volume, History of the Edgar Allan Poe Society, is largely in narrative form. It is accompanied by a second volume of minutes and annual reports from which the history was drawn.

This collection is part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography. Related materials may be found in other Hubbell Center collections, including the Jay B. Hubbell Papers, Arlin Turner Papers, Clarence Gohdes Papers, Poe Studies Association Records, and the Modern Language Association, American Literature Section Papers.

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Duke University alumnus and independent scholar on Edgar Allan Poe and 19th century American literature. Correspondence, research, and writings on Edgar Allan Poe and other 19th century American writers, including Hardin E. Taliaferro and Augustin L. Taveau. Prominent correspondents include Clarence Gohdes, Jay B. Hubbell, Thomas Ollive Mabbott, Joel Myerson, Dwight Thomas, and J.H. Whitty. Research notes and writings include material on Jackson's books Poe and the Southern Literary Messenger, and The Poe Log: A Documentary Life of Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1847, as well as articles by Poe scholars Richard Kopley and Benjamin Franklin Fisher. The collection is part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The David Kelly Jackson Papers span the years 1925 to 1991, with one item dating to 1850. The collection contains correspondence, research notes, and writings accumulated during Jackson's lifelong study of Edgar Allan Poe and other 19th century American writers. As documented by the Correspondence Series, Jackson's work in these areas led him to correspond with such literary scholars as Clarence Gohdes, Jay B. Hubbell, Thomas Ollive Mabbott, Joel Myerson, Dwight Thomas, and J.H. Whitty. A number of letters relate specifically to Jackson's research on two books: his first, Poe and the Southern Literary Messenger; and the 1987 book he co-authored with Thomas, The Poe Log. Drafts of the latter book, including a complete draft of Jackson's early, unpublished, solo version of it, comprise the bulk of the Writings Series. There is also a significant amount of his research on the Southern Literary Messenger, a Richmond, Virginia literary periodical that Poe once edited. The SLM files include a June 1850 letter to one of its contributors, Augustin L. Taveau. Finally, the series contains research materials pertaining to Hardin E. Taliaferro, a 19th-century North Carolina humorist whose writings Jackson collected into a book entitled Carolina Humor. The third series, Professional and Personal Activities, consists mainly of research in the form of various printed materials from such scholarly associations as the Poe Museum, the Edgar Allan Poe Society, the Poe Studies Association and the Society for the Study of Southern Literature. Also found here are articles written by Poe scholars Richard Kopley and Benjamin Franklin Fisher.

The David Kelly Jackson Papers are part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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The papers consist of correspondence from Jay B. Hubbell and John Olin Eidson. The Eidson letters (5 items) discuss the upcoming program of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association of America and suggest Richard Armour as the featured speaker. The letters are arranged chronologically.

Accession (1992-0127) (20,000 items, 30.0 lin. ft.) includes correspondence, research and teaching notes, writings, student offprints, card files, photostats, materials relating to the Center for Editions of American Authors, files relating to American Literature, printed matter, clippings, and other miscellaneous items. Correspondence includes letters from Jay B. Hubbell and John O. Eidson; the latter concern the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association.

Accession (2002-0104), dated 1858-2000 (1251 items; 6.8 linear feet) primarily comprises materials related to writings by Cady and his former student Thomas F. O'Donnell regarding author, editor, and critic William Dean (W.D.) Howells. In 2000, Cady edited and wrote an introduction to a volume of Howells' poetry entitled Pebbles, Monochromes, and Other Modern Poems, 1891-1916, and his collection holds various drafts of this work as well as correspondence between Cady and his publishers concerning the book's publication. Also included is material written by or collected by Cady or O'Donnell while editing or writing other books and articles regarding Howells' poetry; and original correspondence from Howells to his publishers.

Accession (2010-0083) (300 items; 7.5 lin. ft.) includes books by and about William Dean Howells, most with annotations by Edwin Cady and Harry H. Clark, as well as materials (first proofs, drafts, and other Howells publications) that were used by Cady in the preparation of Howells' complete works. Books date from approximately 1881-1981; manuscript materials date from approximately 1879-1992.

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Harriet R. Holman papers, 1869-1986 16.5 Linear Feet — About 7899 Items

Author and professor of English from Anderson, S.C. Collection is chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell, and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley.

The papers of Harriet Rebecca Holman span the years 1869-1986, and are chiefly significant for Holman's correspondence with writers, publishers and colleagues concerning the teaching and writing of American literature. Significant correspondents include Jay B. Hubbell, Rayburn Moore, Henry Field, Ann Page Johns, Armistead C. Gordon, Jr., Dr. Jeremiah N. Fusco, Corydon Bell, Guy Davenport, Edith Buchanan, Margaret Meaders, David Stocking, Marion Kingston Stocking, Newman I. White, E. M. Lander, Jr., Mattie U. Russell and members of the Thomas Nelson Page and John Fox families. The Page family materials constitute a large portion of the materials in this collection and are represented by their own series. There are also letters from South Carolina authors, including Rosa Pendleton Chiles, Sidelle Ellis, Patricia Kneas Hill, Katharine M. Jones, Mary Boone Robertson Longley, and Alice L. O'Connell. Also includes works written or edited by Holman and others, a typed transcription of Cherokee stories as told by Mary Ulmer Chiltoskey, clippings, notecard files, printed material, and photographs of Thomas Nelson and Florence Lathrop Page, and Nannie Mae Tilley. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

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Harry Paul Taylor papers, 1975-1982 3.7 Linear Feet — 8 boxes, 530 items

This collection contains a variety of items including variant manuscripts of the 79 poems included in Harry Paul Taylor's book, IMAGERY IN POETRY. There are notes of ideas he incorporated into the poems, revisions, and some layout instruction. One folder contains a brief biographical sketch and a review in which Taylor explains how his poetry is written, what his poetical theories are, and what he hopes to accomplish. There are other poems, letters from Dr. Jay B. Hubbell to Taylor; and other correspondence and clippings concerning Allan Halladay and Gustave Whitehead. There is also an autographed copy of a book about Whitehead, HISTORY BY CONTRACT: BEGINNING OF MOTORIZED AVIATION by William J. O'Dwyer and Stella Randolph. There are three versions of SPACE AGE POETRY and a number of other poems on miscellaneous subjects. Included also is the volume A LIFE SCENARIO WITH ARTIST ANTONIO CIRINO by Charles Movalli, poetized by Taylor; and typescript copies of "The Lady of Liberty." This collection is a part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

This collection contains a variety of items of the American poet Harry Paul Taylor including variant manuscripts of the 79 poems included in his book, IMAGERY IN POETRY. There are notes of ideas he incorporated into the poems, revisions, and some layout instruction. One folder contains a brief biographical sketch and a review in which Taylor explains how his poetry is written, what his poetical theories are, and what he hopes to accomplish.

There are other poems, letters from Dr. Jay B. Hubbell to Taylor; and other correspondence and clippings concerning Allan Halladay and Gustave Whitehead. There is also an autographed copy of a book about Whitehead, HISTORY BY CONTRACT: BEGINNING OF MOTORIZED AVIATION by William J. O'Dwyer and Stella Randolph. There are three versions of SPACE AGE POETRY and a number of other poems on miscellaneous subjects. Included also is the volume A LIFE SCENARIO WITH ARTIST ANTONIO CIRINO by Charles Movalli, poetized by Taylor; and typescript copies of "The Lady of Liberty."

A later addition to the collection (2008-0176) (10 items, 0.2 lin. ft.; dated 1976-1979) contains Taylor's letters to professor Ben Powell. Attached to the letters are proofs and marketing materials for IMAGERY IN POETRY, as well as a history of his poetry that included samples of the works he mentioned.

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Ima Honaker Herron papers, 1958-1985 1.2 Linear Feet — 16 Items

Herron taught American literature at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. The collection includes correspondence, manuscript articles, and other material.

This collection consists of two letters, two manuscript articles paying tribute to Jay B. Hubbell and Ernest Erwin Leisy, reprints of Herron's articles, and clippings and reports pertaining to Southern Methodist University. A copy of the SOUTHWEST REVIEW, Spring 1979, which contains an obituary of Jay B. Hubbell, and a copy of "The Academic Writings of Ima Honaker Herron: A Checklist" by Eddie Gay Cone were added to the collection in 1986.

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James Leslie Woodress papers, 1941-1976 2.4 Linear Feet — 1112 Items

Professor of American literature at the University of California, Davis. The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection (2.4 linear feet) consists mainly of professional papers including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works on the history of American literature.

The James Leslie Woodress Papers span the years from 1941 to 1976. The collection consists mainly of professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, editors and publishers, copyright holders, libraries, and others regarding the production of a number of Woodress' published works, including Booth Tarkington: Gentleman from Indiana, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America: A Collection in Honor of Clarence Gohdes, Howells and Italy, A Yankee's Odyssey: The Life of Joel Barlow, and "Voices from America's Past," a historical pamphlets series. Among the significant correspondents are Ashbel G. Brice and John Menapace of the Duke University Press, Elizabeth Blackert and Robert F. Wilson of McGraw-Hill, and scholars such as Walter Blair, Hugh Holman, Jay B. Hubbell, Lewis Leary, Floyd Stovall, and Willard Thorp. Background notes and drafts of publication materials are also contained in the collection. The collection is divided into seven series, corresponding to Woodress' published works and arranged in alphabetical order by title: Booth Tarkington, Dissertations in American Literature, Eight American Authors, Essays Mostly on Periodical Publishing in America, Howells and Italy, Voices from America's Past, and Yankee's Odyssey. These series are described fully below. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Professor of American literature, Duke University, Durham, N.C. The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA).

The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA). The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical; Correspondence, Alphabetical; Correspondence by Date; Writings and Speeches; Subject Files; Teaching Abroad; Photographs; and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series contains correspondence, manuscripts of his autobiographical writings, financial and legal documents, writings by his siblings, curriculum vitae, and obituaries, all of which chronicle Hubbell's life from his earliest years until his death.

The largest component of the collection contains correspondence from colleagues, former students, and literary figures. The Correspondence, Alphabetical Series consists of many letters from students and colleagues. The bulk of the correspondence gives shape to the nature and status of American literary studies in the early- to mid-twentieth century. In particular, the many letters exchanged among Hubbell, his colleagues, and his students provide insight into the routine professional life of this first pioneering generation of scholars. From job appointments to topics of scholarship, the letters uncover the kinds of professional interests and pressures that influenced the formation of American literary studies. Additional miscellaneous letters are arranged chronologically in the Correspondence by Date Series. These letters mainly represent single items from colleagues, publishers, and minor writers. The same topics are represented here as in the correspondence arranged alphabetically.

Jay B. Hubbell authored numerous articles and books throughout his career which contributed to the bibliography of American literary studies. Samples of such are located in the collection's Writings and Speeches Series. The series is divided into two subseries, the Writings by Hubbell Subseries and the Writings by Others Subseries. The Writings by Hubbell Subseries includes unpublished manuscripts, publication files consisting of correspondence with publishers and review clippings, and printed material consisting of article reprints and reviews. The Writings by Others Subseries contains articles and essays by Hubbell's colleagues and peers, as well as several essays that Hubbell collected on topics of interest to him. It also contains several memoirs which narrate the lives and influence of several key figures in the first generations of American literary scholars.

The Subject Files Series chronicles some of the major events, interests, and projects of Hubbell's career. His involvement with the Modern Language Association is represented by material filed in the General Files Subseries. Also included in this subseries is material concerning several of his institutional affiliations, including Clemson University, Columbia University, and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Hubbell's papers concerning his many professional projects can be found in the Projects Subseries, such as the Checklist of Manuscripts and the Center for Southern Studies. Information related to many of the subject files can be found throughout the collection, particularly in the Biographical Data and Correspondence Series.

Jay Hubbell dedicated a generous portion of his scholarly career to teaching and students. Besides his interest in different configurations and institutions for furthering learning and scholarship, Hubbell spent several years teaching abroad. The Teaching Abroad Series contains correspondence and incidentals concerning his service at universities in Vienna, Jerusalem, and Athens. This series includes materials which highlight Hubbell's experiences at the intersection of American foreign policy and university teaching, as Hubbell served as a Visiting Expert for the U.S. Army in Vienna as well as a quickly evacuated Visiting Professor in Jerusalem in 1956, during the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The Photographs Series includes photographs of Hubbell, family, and colleagues. The series includes portraits of Hubbell alone as well as with family.

The Clippings Series contains newspaper and journal clippings recording the many significant personal and professional events of Hubbell's life. The series also includes clippings about contemporary events, friends, and colleagues which Hubbell found noteworthy.

Hubbell's papers pertaining to English Department matters and committee assignments can be found in the Duke University Archives. The David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University houses many related collections, particularly in the Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography: the records of American Literature; American Literary Manuscripts; and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section and Southern Literature Discussion Group; and the papers of Gay Wilson Allen, Sacvan Berkovitch, Cathy Davidson, and Arlin Turner.

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John Esten Cooke papers, 1840-1941 and undated 0.75 Linear Feet — Approx. 296 Items

John Esten Cooke (1830-1886) was a novelist, historian, lawyer, and Confederate Army Officer, of Millwood (Clarke Co.), Va. Professional and personal correspondence and literary notes of John Esten Cooke and of his brother, Philip Pendleton Cook, poet and storyteller. The John E. Cooke papers include letters from boyhood friends, Civil War letters, business letters from publishers, critical letters from literary friends during the 1870s and 1880s, and notebooks of the war period. Includes manuscript copies of Cooke's Surry of Eagle's Nest, A legend of Turkey Buzzard Hollow, and On the road to despotism. The Philip P. Cooke papers include letters to his father, of interest in themselves as literary productions. Correspondents in the collection include W.H. Appleton, George W. Bagby, Alexander R. Boteler, W.H. Browne, O.B. Burie, M.B.T. Clark, W. De Hass, M. Schele De Vere, H.K. Douglas, E.A. Duyckinck, G.C. Eggleston, William Evelyn, Wade Hampton, J.W. Harper, H.B. Hirst, J.B. Jones, J.P. Kennedy, C.C. Lee, W.H. Lee, B.W. Leigh, A.H. Sands, W.G. Simms, David Strother, and Beverly Tucker.

Professional and personal correspondence and literary notes of novelist and Civil War Confederate officer John Esten Cooke and of his brother, Philip Pendleton Cook (1816-1850), poet and storyteller. The John E. Cooke papers primarily consist of business letters from publishers and critical letters from literary friends during the 1870s and 1880s, but also include letters from boyhood friends, a few Civil War letters. There are also diaries from the war period, and manuscript copies of Cooke's novel about Stonewall Jackson, Surry of Eagle's Nest, A Legend of Turkey Buzzard Hollow, and article "On the Road to Despotism." The Philip P. Cooke papers include letters to his father, of interest in themselves as literary productions; he was considered to be equally talented if not more so than his father.

Civil War era items include a few letters written to Cooke, indicating his state of illness and discouragement during the war and his lack of communication with family; and Cooke's four manuscript diaries. The diaries contain references throughout to battles around Richmond, Cold Harbour, Chancellorsville, J.E.B. Stuart, Robert E. Lee, Gen. John R. Cooke, Stonewall Jackson (especially his death in 1863), Gen. William N. Pendleton, the re-election of Lincoln, camp life, and the social life of Stuart's staff. They also contain Cooke's literary jottings and references to literary figures such as Victor Hugo. A copy of the 1941 edition of the diaries is included in the collection.

Correspondents in the collection include W.H. Appleton, George W. Bagby, Alexander R. Boteler, W.H. Browne, O.B. Burie, M.B.T. Clark, W. De Hass, M. Schele De Vere, H.K. Douglas, E.A. Duyckinck, G.C. Eggleston, William Evelyn, Wade Hampton, J.W. Harper, H.B. Hirst, J.B. Jones, J.P. Kennedy, C.C. Lee, W.H. Lee, B.W. Leigh, A.H. Sands, W.G. Simms, David Strother, and Beverly Tucker.

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John Hall Wheelock collection, 1935-1979 1.5 Linear Feet — 640 Items

Poet and editor. The John Hall Wheelock collection forms the only substantial group of American literary authors' letters included in the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke. Hubbell was a longtime friend and admirer of Wheelock; the two corresponded for many years. When Hubbell donated his Wheelock materials to the Center, he suggested that associated collections be acquired, which initiated a decade-long effort to collect and preserve Wheelock's correspondence. Collectively the collections document, chiefly through correspondence, the developments in Wheelock's life and career. Belknap's papers reflect Wheelock's view of one of his cousins. Clemente's papers include a videotape of Wheelock reading his poetry. The Diana Chang, Michel Farano, Elwood Holstein, Leighton Rollins, and Carolyn Tyson materials suggest Wheelock's gratitude towards his admirers and support of younger poets; those of Elwood Holstein include Holstein's autobiographical sketch and account of his correspondence with Wheelock. Kenworthy's papers reflect not only her admiration of the poet and his response, they document Wheelock's increasing concern about his health. Stoddard's papers reflect her close friendship with Wheelock during his final years and their mutual encouragement. Most of the collections include Wheelock's handwritten copies and draft versions of his poems. Hubbell's admiration for Wheelock is suggested in letters from Hubbell to Vince Clemente and Elwood Holstein.

The John Hall Wheelock Collections are the only substantial group of American literary authors' letters included in Duke University's Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography. Duke Professor of American Literature Jay B. Hubbell was a longtime friend and admirer of John Hall Wheelock; the two corresponded for many years. When Hubbell donated his Wheelock materials to the Center, he suggested that the Center collect other Wheelock materials, a suggestion that initiated a decade-long effort to collect and preserve Wheelock's correspondence. The Duke University John Hall Wheelock Collection (1935-1979) consist of the following nine sub-collections: the Helen S. Belknap Papers, the Diana Chang Papers, the Vince Clemente Papers, the Michel Farano Papers, the Elwood Holstein Papers, the Marion E. Kenworthy Papers, the Leighton Rollins Papers, the Hope Stoddard Papers, and the Carolyn Tyson Papers.

Collectively the John Hall Wheelock Collection documents, chiefly through correspondence, the developments in the life and career of John Hall Wheelock (1886-1978) during the last twenty-five years of his life. The Helen S. Belknap Papers reflect Wheelock's view of one of his cousins. The Vince Clemente Papers include a videotape of Wheelock reading his poetry. The Diana Chang Papers, the Michel Farano Papers, the Elwood Holstein Papers, the Leighton Rollins Papers, and the Carolyn Tyson Papers suggest Wheelock's gratitude towards his admirers and his support of younger poets; the Elwood Holstein Papers also include Holstein's autobiographical sketch and his account of his correspondence with Wheelock. The Marion E. Kenworthy Papers reflect not only Kenworthy's admiration of Wheelock and Wheelock's response to her but also Wheelock's increasing concerns over his health. The Hope Stoddard Papers reflect the close friendship and mutual encouragement of Stoddard and Wheelock in his final years. Most of the John Hall Wheelock Collections include copies and versions of Wheelock's poems handwritten by Wheelock himself.

Jay B. Hubbell's admiration for John Hall Wheelock is suggested in letters from Hubbell about Wheelock which are included in the Vince Clemente Papers and the Elwood Holstein Papers. Collections in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library related to the John Hall Wheelock Collections include the Jay Broadus Hubbell Papers; additional information may be found in the correspondence files of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.