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North Carolina affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union, founded in 1965 and based in Raleigh. The records of the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU of N.C.) date from the 1960s to the mid-2000s. The collection is organized into the following series: ACLU Historical Files, Executive Director Files, Legal Program, Audiovisual Material, and Print Material. The files primarily focus on the investigation and prosecution of cases related to civil rights, public education relating to civil liberties, and lobbying for civil liberties and human rights. Materials include correspondence files from the Excecutive Director's office and other units in the ACLU of N.C., thousands of case files; administrative files on cases, operations, and attorney's activities; lobbying and subject files; and printed matter and other records relating to outreach and public education activities. There are also some a/v materials and electronic files. Topics include: the civil rights and legal status of legally under-represented groups such as juveniles and high school students, prisoners, gays, and immigrants; education and academic freedoms; religious freedom and separation of church and state; freedom of expression (including desecration of the flag); racial inequalities and injustices; reproductive rights; women's rights; police misconduct and the legality of search procedures; drug testing and the decriminalization of drugs; voting rights, including issues surrounding reapportionment; and workers' rights, including unionization. There are also files on the Ku Klux Klan, Confederate displays, and right-wing organizations. Many of these issues span decades of ACLU involvement. Researchers consulting case files and any other materials should be aware of privacy laws that govern the publication and use of these records. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The records of the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (ACLU of NC) span forty years, from its inception in the early 1960s to its activities in the mid-2000s. The files provide documentation on nearly all aspects of the organization's operations, primarily focusing on the investigation of cases related to civil rights and many related issues, the legal prosecution of cases, public education relating to civil liberties, and lobbying for civil liberties and human rights. Materials include correspondence files from the Excecutive Director's office and other units in the ACLU of NC, beginning from the earliest years; thousands of case files dating from 1969 through the mid-2000s; the legal assistant's files on cases, operations, and attorney's activities; lobbying and subject files; and printed matter and other records relating to the ACLU-NC's outreach and public education activities. There are also some slides related to arts cases, videocassette and audiocassette recordings, and electronic files. Commonly recurring social and legal issues to which the ACLU of NC dedicated its efforts and resources include but are not limited to: the civil rights and legal status of legally under-represented groups such as juveniles and high school students, prisoners, gays, and immigrants; education and academic freedoms; religious freedom and separation of church and state; freedom of expression (including desecration of the flag); racial inequalities and injustices; reproductive rights; women's rights; police misconduct and the legality of search procedures; drug testing and the decriminalization of drugs; voting rights, including issues surrounding reapportionment; and workers' rights, including unionization. There are also many files on the Ku Klux Klan, Confederate displays, and right-wing organizations in NC

The collection is open to use. However, researchers consulting case files and any other materials in this collection should be aware of privacy laws that govern the publication and use of these records, especially in the case of third party information. Most personal names have been removed from case file titles in this web-accessible collection guide. The full version is available only to on-site researchers.

The Legal Program Series, the largest series in the collection at 260 boxes, chiefly consists of court case and other investigations files, and were created and maintained by the branch of the ACLU of NC called the North Carolina Legal Foundation. The files were marked variously as coming from the Office of the Legal Counsel or the Legal Program. These files were kept in their original order, which was generally chronological, though there are many overlapping series and fragmented sequences, some of which are alphabetical. When possible, the nature of the case or investigation is noted in a few words for each entry; keyword searching is the best means to discover names or topics (e.g., "parental consent,""prayer,""1st Amendment,""employee,""free speech," etc.).

Files in the Executive Director Office Series (90 boxes) refer to meetings, annual ACLU national conferences, litigation and political action strategizing, fundraising, and membership, and contain many individual legislative and court case files maintained by the Executive Director's Office (who at times in the ACLU of NC's history also served as the Legal Director). Extensive research and "issues" files, as they were often called, found both in the Legal Program and Executive Office Series, were most often used to support the case and investigative work, and therefore cover topics similar to the case files. Other subject files reflect the Executive Director's efforts to learn about issues relating to other affiliates of the ACLU.

Smaller but significant components of the collection include the Audiovisual Material Series, housing videocassettes and audio recordings, and the Print Material Series, which houses publications, clippings, reports, and other print material created by the ACLU of NC as well as material from other organizations. A nearly complete run of the ACLU of NC's newsletter, Liberty, can be found here, as well as multiple issues from such publications as Prison Law Monitor, Veteran's Advocate, and Youth Law News. Other publications are filed by topic. Many press releases, clippings, and files related to media relations are found in the Executive Director Office Series, and to a lesser extent in the Legal Program Series.

Researchers interested in the earliest history of the ACLU of NC should consult the small Historical Files Series which contains a 1970 history of the organization written by Daniel Pollitt and George Scheer, as well as copies of the original founding documents of incorporation, board and legal foundation meeting minutes from the 1960s to the 1980s, and other files. More complete files of early correspondence, meetings, and legal cases dating from the 1960s and 1970s can be found in other series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Americans for Immigrant Justice (formerly Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center [FIAC]) is a not-for-profit legal assistance organization dedicated to protecting and promoting the basic human rights of immigrants of all nationalities. The Americans for Immigrant Justice records span the years of 1980-2017. The collection contains project files and correspondence regarding immigrant detention policy and conditions in the state of Florida, particularly concerning the Haitian community; legal documents regarding the same, including restricted and confidential legal files; and audiovisual material produced by or for AIJ. The bulk of materials are organized by subject and detention facility.

The Americans for Immigrant Justice (AIJ) records, formerly the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC), span the years of 1980-2017. This collection contains extensive documentation of the events and crises surrounding asylum, deportation, detention and abuses that took place within Florida detention centers from the years 1980 to 2017, as well as documentation regarding issues of repatriation. It records the efforts of AIJ to advocate on behalf of immigrant and refugee populations, mainly in Florida, during this time. The majority of material in this collection deals with Haitians seeking asylum in the U.S., but also includes major material on Cuban and Central American refugees, then minor files on Chinese, Middle Eastern, and other immigrant populations. Many files focus on Cheryl Little's work with child refugees and detainees and their asylum claims, and on discrimination against female immigrants. Files also include material on interdiction at sea and related court documents, government immigration policy pre- and post-9/11, documentation on hunger strikes at various facilities, material related to the Haitian Boat crises, and documentation of raids on immigrant populations. The detention facilities of particular concern in this collection include Guantanamo, Krome, and Turner Guilford Knight correctional facilities, as well as Florida's county jails.

The collection contains legal documents related to the activity of AIJ, including affidavits of detainees held in Florida facilities, and other court documents, such as court pleadings and briefings; reports on facility conditions; correspondence, including correspondence between detainees and their families, letters from concerned citizens, and formal correspondence between AIJ and other organizations and officials; case studies and reports on immigration and refugee crises, and reports of abuses and conditions in Florida detention facilities; FBI interviews with detainees; related articles and speeches; restricted material, including medical records; and promotional and educational videos produced by or for AIJ, documentary footage of missions and events, and press conference and news footage.

The series in this collection include the Detention Series, the Immigrant and Refugees Series, the Restricted Series, the General Organizational Records Series, the Audiovisual Series and the Photographic Materials Series. The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Detention Series and the Immigrant and Refugees Series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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The Center for Death Penalty Litigation is a non-profit law firm that represents inmates on North Carolina's death row. Its work often involves the investigation of racism and the judicial process, and the treatment of people with mental disabilities charged with crimes in North Carolina. Collection contains Center for Death Penalty Litigation case files dating from 1953-2020 for seventeen inmates on North Carolina's death row during the same period: Robert Bacon Jr., David Junior Brown, Frederick Camacho, Willie Ervin Fisher, George Earl Goode Jr., Harvey Lee Green Jr., Zane Hill, David Earl Huffstetler, Joseph Timothy Keel (the largest case file at 26 boxes), Gary Wayne Long, James Lewis Martin Jr., Elton Ozell McLaughlin, Phillip Thomas Robbins Jr., Steve Van McHone, Jimmy McNeill, Clinton Cebert Smith, and Norris Carlton Taylor, as well as limited files on other inmates. Case files typically include transcripts, affidavits, attorney notes, clemency requests, petitions, pleadings, photographs, correspondence, motions, Department of Corrections documents, Resource Center files, investigative files, audiovisual materials, and some electronic records.

The records of the Center for Death Penalty Litigation (CDPL) span the years 1953-2020, and contain the Center's case files for seventeen inmates on North Carolina's death row during the same period: Robert Bacon Jr., David Junior Brown, Frederick Camacho, Willie Ervin Fisher, George Earl Goode Jr., Harvey Lee Green Jr., Zane Hill, David Earl Huffstetler, Joseph Timothy Keel (the largest case file at 26 boxes), Gary Wayne Long, James Lewis Martin Jr., Elton Ozell McLaughlin, Phillip Thomas Robbins Jr., Steve Van McHone, Jimmy McNeill, Clinton Cebert Smith, and Norris Carlton Taylor, as well as limited files on other inmates and web content from the organization. The Center for Death Penalty Litigation's work often involves the investigation of racism and the judicial process, and the treatment of people with mental disabilities charged with crimes in North Carolina.[Note: materials in this collection may use outdated terms such as "mentally retarded" to refer to people with mental disabilities.] Case files typically include some combination of transcripts, affidavits, attorney notes, clemency requests, petitions, pleadings, correspondence, motions, investigative files, Department of Corrections documents, photographs, audiovisual materials, Resource Center files, and in some cases, electronic files. The case files are arranged in alphabetical order by the defendant's last name. The Web Series consists of crawls of the Center for Death Penalty Litigation website. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Non-profit organization founded in 1975, based in Washington, DC, whose chief focus is promoting changes in U.S. foreign and military policy in support of global human rights. The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA); topics cover human rights issues, U.S. relations with Central and South America, demilitarization, nuclear weapons, the Cuban trade embargo, money laundering and other aspects of international finance, terrorism, and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files on other organizations; there are also many files of printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The records of the Center for International Policy (CIP) span the years 1960 to 2016, and document in detail the organization's global activities in support of human rights as well as its internal administration, funding, and public relations outreach. CIP's chief areas of interest lie in documenting and reforming United States foreign and military policies, including the activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Specific topics covered by materials in the collection include U.S. relations with Central and South America, particularly with Colombia, El Salvador, Haiti, and Cuba; U.S. relations with South and East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula; demilitarization in areas of conflict; nuclear weapons and the arms race; the Cuban trade embargo; money laundering and other aspects of international finance; terrorism in various countries; and the narcotics trade. The bulk of the files take the form of administrative files and records on other organizations which contain correspondence, memos, data, reports, travel documents, and extensive files; there are also many files containing printed materials such as pamphlets, newsletters, and press releases.

The CIP records are arranged in the following series: Development Files Series; Printed Materials Series; Oversize Materials Series; Robert White Papers Series; Adam Isacson Papers Series; Selig Harrison Papers Series; Wayne S. Smith Papers Series; Geographic, Subject, and Program Files Series; and Audiovisual Materials Series.

White's and Isacson's files retain their original arrangement into groups such as correspondence (some in digital form), research and subject files, speeches, and travel documentation. Harrison's files retain their original arrangment by region, such South and West Asia, East Asia and North Korea, while some materials have been removed to the Nuclear and Energy Subseries. The research files claim the largest proportion of the files for all individuals, and contain documentation on other organizations, individuals, and extensive information in particular on Central and South America and Asia. Other countries represented in the collection files to a lesser extent include Russia, Israel, Cuba and other countries surrounding the South and East Asia regions. Correspondence files are present throughout the collection, and include key individuals such as Iowa Senator Tom Harkin; Peter Dale Scott, former Canadian ambassador and political commentator; and Harrison Selig, Director of the Asia Program. Many other well-known politicians and activists are represented in smaller folders of materials; there are also a small number of administrative files related to internal staff members and board members. The development files reveal the nature of the CIP's fundraising activities, and the extent of support from charitable organizations; the most extensive files belong to the Ford Foundation, General Service Foundation, International Center for Development Policy, and the MacArthur Foundation; smaller files represent many other similar institutions.

Collection acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Human rights researcher and policy advocate at the Washington Office on Latin America. The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú.

The Coletta Youngers Papers span the dates 1977-2004, and consist of reports and scholarly research, clippings, correspondence, and government documents related to socio-political conditions and human rights issues in Perú, gathered by Youngers while living in Peru during the 1980s and researching her 2003 book on political violence in Perú. The collection is divided into the Printed Material and the Subject Files Series; there is also a separate listing at the end of this finding aid of printed works transferred to the Duke University Perkins Library general collections. Beyond the research materials in these series, there are currently no additional personal papers of Youngers in the collection. The Printed Material Series contains published reports on human rights circulated by a wide variety of organizations working inside and outside Perú. Most of the Perú-based human rights organizations are connected with the Coordinadora de Derechos Humanos (CNDDHH), an umbrella human rights organization based in Lima. Youngers' research files on human rights issues and a subseries of Peruvian and Latin American serial publications complete the Printed Material Series. The Subject Files Series contains files and informal reports of the CNDDHH and associated human rights organizations, most notably the Asociación Pro Derechos Humanos (APRODEH), El Centro de Asesoría Laboral del Perú (CEDAL), and the Instituto Defensa Legal (IDL). Further documentation of human rights abuses by government and rebel factions, drug policy files, papers related to former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori's security advisor Vladimiro Montesinos, and the Maoist guerrilla group Sendero Luminoso complete the collection. Material in this collection documents the complex links between Peruvian government policy and international pressure, and the violent tactics employed by revolutionary groups as well as agents of the Peruvian government. Further, it chronicles the consequences of those actions, especially for rural and indigenous populations and local human rights advocates. The collection also contains numerous U.S. government documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which give insight into U.S. diplomacy, military and drug policy. Substantial portions of the collection are in Spanish. Aquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Common Sense Foundation records, 1983-2008 and undated 19 Linear Feet — Approximately 11,625 Items

Progressive policy think-tank based in North Carolina. Spanning the years 1983 to 2008, the Common Sense Foundation (CSF) Records contain manuscript, print, audiovisual, and electronic materials related to the foundation's administration and work on various policy initiatives, which include the death penalty, taxation and economic justice, the environment, gay rights, health care, testing in public schools and other education issues, the tobacco industry, and North Carolina politics. The collection primarily contains clippings, reports, administrative documents, and correspondence, including emails, and is organized into the following series: Administrative Files, Audiovisual Materials, Board of Directors, Photographs, Printed Materials, Research Files, Staff Files, and Website. The largest group of materials relates to CSF's research on public policy. Several thousand electronic files in the collection have been migrated to a library server. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Spanning the years 1983 to 2008, the Common Sense Foundation Records contain manuscript, print, audiovisual, and electronic materials related to CSF's administration and work on various policy initiatives, which include the death penalty, taxation and economic justice, the environment, gay rights, health care, testing in public schools and other education issues, health care, the tobacco industry, and North Carolina politics, and many other civil rights issues. The collection primarily contains clippings, reports, administrative documents, and correspondence, including emails, and is organized into the following series: Administrative Files, Audiovisual Materials, Board of Directors, Photographs, Printed Materials, Research Files, Staff Files, and Website. The largest group of materials relates to CSF's research on public policy. Thousands of electronic files representing materials related to the series in the collection have been migrated to a library server. Files must be screened for confidential material before use can be granted.

Several series focus on the administration of the foundation. In addition to documenting the foundation's bylaws and history, the Administrative Files Series contains documents related to CSF's finances and membership, sponsorship of events, strategic planning, and personnel. Related material can also be found in the Staff Files Series. The administration and strategic plan of the foundation is also treated in the Board of Directors Series (closed until 2020), which contains minutes of board meetings and information about board members. The Photographs Series houses images of CSF events.

Other series document the foundation's policy initiatives. The Printed Materials Subseries contains copies of works published by CSF, clippings of articles written by CSF staff, and publications on related topics printed by other organizations. Organized by topic, the Research Files Series contains files related to the foundation's research and organizing work, principally on the death penalty, economic issues, fair testing in public schools, North Carolina politicians, and health care. Primarily containing clippings and reports, this series also includes letters written by incarcerated people to CSF, and includes the foundation's survey of lawyers who represented death row inmates. The Audiovisual Materials Series contains videocassettes related to CSF's policy initiatives and that document foundation-sponsored events. CSF's presence on the internet is documented in the Website Series, which contains both policy and administrative material.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 29.3 Gigabytes — 5031 files — 40 color photographic prints; 5033 digital files (4681 jpeg, 257 tiff, 68 png, 11 mp4, 10 pdf, 2 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 2 txt)

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Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises color photographs and supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises 20 color photographs and over 4000 supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Electronic resources related to these two projects include almost 5000 born-digital image files in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include digital contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing. Note: Tiff images from the "On Board the Aquarius" project are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the library reading room.

The 2017 Aquarius migrant rescue project include many additional related digital files: these include nine videos in mp4 format, taken by Darrin Zammit Lupi. Five document the MV Aquarius rescue and a transfer of refugees from another ship; three are interviews with an Italian rescuer and two migrants; and one is a news report video narrated by Lupi. The interviews describe conditions in detention centers in Libya and on board the escape boats.

Other supporting documents and digital content for the 2017 Aquarius migrant project comprise press releases in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, and other languages; shot lists; demographic data summarizing the makeup of the migrants on board the rescue ship; screen shots of Reuters social media posts relating to this story, featuring Zammit Lupi's images; and scans of a 17-page journal kept by Zammit Lupi while aboard the rescue ship.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

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Dorsey & Whitney records, 1997-2008 and undated, bulk 2004-2008 7.8 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — Approximately 4,875 Items

Dorsey & Whitney LLP is a Minneapolis-based business law firm whose lawyers took on the pro bono cases of Bahraini detainees at the Guantánamo Bay detention center. The Dorsey & Whitney Records span the years 1997-2008, with the majority of the materials created between 2004 and 2008. The records consist largely of legal papers, news clippings, writings and correspondence regarding the cases of six Bahraini detainees: Jumah Al-Dossari, Abdullah Al-Nuaimi, Isa Al-Murbati, Salah Al-Balooshi, Adel Hajji and Salman bin Ibrahim Al-Khalifa, kept under extra-judicial detention by the U.S. military at Camp Delta, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. A team of three lawyers, Mark S. Sullivan, Joshua Colangelo-Bryan and Christopher G. Karagheuzoff took on the cases of Bahraini detainees pro bono in 2004. The records in this collection document the lawyers' legal motions, public campaigns and diplomatic negotiations for writ of habeas corpus and the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees. Many of these documents are also present in electronic form. The records are arranged in four series: Case Files, Correspondence, Publicity, and Digital Files. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The Dorsey & Whitney Records span the years 1997-2008, with the majority of the materials created between 2004 and 2008. The records consist largely of legal papers, news clippings, writings and correspondence regarding the cases of six Bahraini detainees: Jumah Al-Dossari, Abdullah Al-Nuaimi, Isa Al-Murbati, Salah Al-Balooshi, Adel Hajji and Salman bin Ibrahim Al-Khalifa, kept under extra-judicial detention by the U.S. military at Camp Delta, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba.

A team of three lawyers, Mark S. Sullivan, Joshua Colangelo-Bryan and Christopher G. Karagheuzoff took on the cases of Bahraini detainees pro bono in 2004. The records in this collection document the lawyers' legal motions, public campaigns and diplomatic negotiations for writ of habeas corpus and the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees, as well the surrounding issues of the Bush administration's responses to terrorism, the civil rights of prisoners of war, and the use of interrogation and torture at U.S. installations. Many of these documents are also present in the form of electronic files.

The records are divided into four series: Case Files, Correspondence, Publicity, and Digital Files. The Case Files Series (nine boxes of the thirteen in the collection) comprises petitions, filings, documents relating to the Combatant Status Review Tribunal (CRST), and a wide variety of legal records regarding the six Bahrainis' and other concurrent Guantánamo detainee cases. The Correspondence Series includes exchanges between client detainees, Department of Justice officials, Bahraini diplomats and officials, U.S. senators and congressmen, law scholars, and colleagues of the Dorsey & Whitney team representing the Guantánamo detainees. The letters and writings in this series cover issues and problems related to the legal status of Guantánamo detainees, human rights violations at Camp Delta, and diplomatic efforts for the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees. The high-profile case of Jumah Al-Dossari, detained in 2001 and eventually released without facing any charges in 2007, is covered in depth in this series, becoming an emblematic example of the abuse and torture at Guantánamo Naval Base and detrimental consequences of long term solitary confinement. Also covered in depth in the Correspondence Series is the Graham-Levin-Kyl Amendment approved by the Senate on November, 15 2005, which prohibits all habeas corpus claims by Guantánamo detainees and allows military tribunals to rely on evidence gathered by the use of torture. The Publicity Series brings together news articles regarding Bahraini Guantánamo detainees, commentaries addressing the legal process and human rights issues, and interviews with Dorsey & Whitney lawyers about the conditions at the military base and the legal and living situation of the detainees. The clippings in the collection were published by major news press and online media outlets worldwide, and include seven folders which hold many Arabic language news clippings. Many of the legal team's documents are also present in the form of electronic documents which are organized into folders described in the Digital Files Series. Also present is a twelve-minute unclassified audio recording on CD-R of the CRST hearing for Al-Murbati, and printed images of the families of the detainees. Original electronic files and recordings are closed to access but use copies may be requested; please contact Research Services.

The Dorsey & Whitney Records are composed of materials predominantly in the English language. There is also a considerable amount of Arabic language items in all three series. These chiefly consist of affidavits, letters by detainees and their relatives, and news clippings. Most of the Arabic language materials have English translations, with the exception of the news clippings.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Clippings, reports, publications, and photographs from Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Dominican Repulic, Grenada, and other Caribbean countries, collected and produced by the Ecumenical Program on Central America and the Caribbean (EPICA). Materials document human rights, government and democracy, and labor conditions in the Caribbean, and largely date from the 1970s and 1980s.

The EPICA collection consists of approximately 4 linear feet of material contained in four cartons. Countries represented include Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Haiti, Grenada, and the French Antilles. Within each box, documents are in folders labeled by country and year(s), about 10-15 folders per country.

The documents were collected in the Caribbean by staff of EPICA (Ecumenical Program on Central America and the Caribbean, a small DC-based group originally funded mainly by the Latin American and Caribbean Office of the National Council of Churches, but no longer operating). The founder and first director of EPICA was the Rev. Philip E. Wheaton.

The documents include newsletters, leaflets, position statements, advocacy materials, analytical papers, and the like, from grassroots groups, political parties, church bodies, academics, etc. Most of the material is from the 1970s and 1980s, with a small amount from the early 1990s.

For each country there is also a folder of notes from interviews with grassroots activists, political party figures, academics, journalists, trade unionists, etc. These are not transcripts, as the interviews were not taped, but handwritten notes on what the person said.

In addition, there are printed materials, mostly publications by EPICA.

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Elizabeth Fink papers, 1971-2015 7 Linear Feet — 779 Gigabytes

Elizabeth Fink was a human rights lawyer who represented prisoners killed and injured during the 1971 Attica prison uprising. The collection consists of photographs gathered as evidence used in the subsequent lawsuits on behalf of Attica prisoners, represented by Fink, as well as some copies of trial transcripts and audiovisual recordings of news coverage, interviews, and footage.

The collection consists of photographs gathered as evidence used in the subsequent lawsuits on behalf of Attica prisoners, represented by Fink, as well as some copies of trial transcripts and audiovisual recordings of news coverage, interviews, and footage of Attica Correctional Facility following the Attica uprising. There are also materials collected by Fink from the Attica Brothers Legal Defense. Content includes photographs and moving images of the prison uprising; guards and officials during the standoff; the subsequent assault and retaking of the prison ("Bloody Monday") by the Russell Oswald and the NY State Police; the aftermath of the assault, including images of the re-captured prisoners, deceased prisoners, debris from the uprising, and armed guards; morgue images and fingerprints of deceased inmates and hostages; interviews and news programs about the event; images of Attica prison facilities; and images and audiovisual of Fink's memorial service and the scattering of Fink's cremated remains. Some of the images and audiovisual materials have been digitized. Images depict graphic violence, nudity, and deceased persons. Collection acquired as part of the Archive of Human Rights (Duke University).