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Prominent British scientist active in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, known for his work on spontaneous generation (abiogenesis) and neurological science. Collection dates from 1841-1932 and documents Bastian's rise as a neuroscientist, biologist, writer, and researcher, and encompasses typed and manuscript correspondence, research notes, offprints, handwritten drafts, early scientific photographs, pencil and ink drawings, and professional reviews and accolades. The largest series contains correspondence dating from 1856 to 1932, from prominent scientists, neurologists, scholars, publishers, assistants, and friends, including Louis Pasteur, Caleb Saleeby, Thomas Huxley, Sir John Bretland Farmer, Aristide Pratelle, William Paton Ker; there are also letters written by Bastian, including exchanges with the Académie des Sciences in France. The materials chiefly concern Bastian's early 20th century work on abiogenesis, but also on aphasia and paralysis. The collection also contains numerous pieces of correspondence addressed to Bastian's daughter, Sybil Bastian, who was also a scientist, and his wife Julia. Other materials include obituaries, condolence letters, Christmas cards, and newspaper clippings. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Henry Charlton Bastian collection dates from 1841 to 1932, with the bulk of the materials falling between 1870 and 1920. The papers document Bastian's rise as a neurologist, writer, and researcher, and encompass typed and manuscript correspondence, research notes, offprints, articles, handwritten drafts, early scientific photographs, pencil and ink drawings, and professional reviews and accolades.

The bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence dating from 1856-1932, chiefly from prominent scientists, neurologists, scholars, publishers, assistants, and friends--including Louis Pasteur, Caleb Saleeby, Thomas Huxley and his wife Annie, Sir John Bretland Farmer, Aristide Pratelle, and William Paton Ker, among many others. There is a group of testimonial letters from fellow scientists. There are a number of outgoing pieces as well written by Bastian which include exchanges with the Académie des sciences of France. The correspondence as well as the research notes and writings chiefly concern Bastian's work on abiogenesis, but also his neurological research on aphasia and paralysis. The collection also contains numerous pieces of correspondence addressed to Bastian's daughter, Sybil Bastian, who was also a scientist, and Bastian's wife Julia; there are in particular many condolence letters received following Bastian's death in 1915. The professional papers include Bastian's research drawings and early photomicrographs, reviews of his work, reprints, and diplomas. Other materials are more personal, and include obituaries, Christmas cards, and a newspaper clipping reporting the details of London's 1919 victory march.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.