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Abraham Hanson papers, 1840-1866 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — 57 items

Abraham Hanson was an English-born American pastor and diplomat. Collection comprises 37 letters, dated 1850-1866, Abraham Hanson wrote to his wife, Lydia, and one he wrote to his father from Monrovia, Liberia, among other places. Topics include abolition, diplomatic duties, commercial affairs, emigration, shipboard travel, the condition of Liberians and his aspirations for them, health concerns, and personal matters. There are also 15 incoming letters written to Hanson and his wife, dated 1846-1866, reporting on Hanson's welfare and conditions in Liberia and Africa, along with personal travel and religious matters. Includes several condolences written to Lydia following Hanson's dearth. In addition, there is funeral sermon Hanson preached on 1848 December 10 in Wisconsin, a copy of the New York City Colonization Society's circular dated 1840 May 3, and a copy of an 1852 Liberian court decision regarding payment of tuition and provision of clothing for Robert Savage. There is also a sermon dated 1863 Dec 10, entitled "Zion's Compliance and God's Answer, Isaiah 49-16-15." Two of the letters in the collection are incomplete. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises 37 letters, dated 1850-1866, Abraham Hanson wrote to his wife, Lydia, and one he wrote to his father from Monrovia, Liberia, among other places. Topics include abolition, diplomatic duties, commercial affairs, emigration, shipboard travel, the condition of Liberians and his aspirations for them, health concerns, and personal matters. There are also 15 incoming letters written to Hanson and his wife, dated 1846-1866, reporting on Hanson's welfare and conditions in Liberia and Africa, along with personal travel and religious matters. Includes several condolences written to Lydia following Hanson's dearth. In addition, there is funeral sermon Hanson preached on 1848 December 10 in Wisconsin, a copy of the New York City Colonization Society's circular dated 1840 May 3, and a copy of an 1852 Liberian court decision regarding payment of tuition and provision of clothing for Robert Savage. There is also a sermon dated 1863 Dec 10, entitled "Zion's Compliance and God's Answer, Isaiah 49-16-15." Two of the letters in the collection are incomplete. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Consists of approximately 50 posters the bulk of which consist of corporate promotions depicting notable African Americans or significant moments in African American history and culture. Posters include biographical sketches of African American writers, scientists, professional athletes, soldiers, civil rights workers and celebrity entertainers. Participating companies include Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser), Army National Guard, CIBA-GEIGY, Columbia Artists Management, Federal Home Loan Bank, Honeywell, Nabisco and Pepsi. Also included in the collection are a number of promotional posters produced by and for the NAACP that address the organization's campaigns to reduce poverty, school dropouts and voter registration, as well as calls to join the NAACP. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture and the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Consists of approximately 50 posters the bulk of which consist of corporate promotions depicting notable African Americans or significant moments in African American history and culture. Posters include biographical sketches of African American writers, scientists, professional athletes, soldiers, civil rights workers and celebrity entertainers. Participating companies include Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser), Army National Guard, CIBA-GEIGY, Columbia Artists Management, Federal Home Loan Bank, Honeywell, Nabisco and Pepsi. Also included in the collection are a number of promotional posters produced by and for the NAACP that address the organization's campaigns to reduce poverty, school dropouts and voter registration, as well as calls to join the NAACP. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture and the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

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The 197 films represented by this collection of movie promotional and advertising materials cover a variety of types of motion pictures, from obscure all-black cast silent films by the Norman Film Manufacturing Company, to movies with supporting and starring roles for African Americans and modern all-black cast films. The collection includes representative coverage of legendary film artists such as Dorothy Dandridge and Sidney Poitier, and more comprehensive coverage of the classic era of Blaxploitation films, the 1970s.

The collection contains over 250 separate press books, campaign books, advertising manuals, supplements and other ephemeral promotional booklets, broadsides or single sheet publications, and posters designed for the use of theater distributors, dating from the independent Black films of the 1920s to 2000. The collection also includes some souvenir program booklets sold at theaters, and two published hardcover books.

Press books are no longer made. They were often extremely elaborate and profusely illustrated, containing many diverse articles about the film, the stars and the filmmakers, as well as ad mattes for proposed publicity campaigns, detailed plot synopses, cast and crew credits, etc. Also featured are small versions of posters available to local theaters. The ad campaigns alone provide a great deal of information about how the actors, directors, and films were promoted in the press and in theater displays. Virtually everything contained in this collection is ephemeral in nature. Even the more recent press kits were never publicly distributed or sold, and are also scarce, possibly unique.

Unless otherwise noted, all the promotional pieces in this collection are of U.S. origin. There are a few items from Great Britain, Denmark, Japan, Germany, and France.

Additional information appears in many but not all of the inventory entries. Some entries include a designation for the type of material, e.g., press book, advertising supplement, promotional booklet, theater program, press book insert, etc. while some entries include a copyright date for the material (especially when this date differs from the film's date). Many entries include the names of one or more of the African-American actors, actresses, singers, directors, screenplay authors or producers involved with the film; however, such lists are selective, not comprehensive. A substantial number of the entries in the inventory also include descriptive comments by the dealer, George Robert Minkoff Inc., and quotes or references selected by the dealer from the following sources: Bogle = Bogle, Donald. Blacks in American films and television: an encyclopedia. Bogle II = Bogle, Donald. Toms, coons, mulattoes, mammies, and bucks: an interpretive history of Blacks in American films.

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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

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Allen L. McKellar was an African American sales and marketing executive based primarily in the St. Louis, Mo. area and one of the first business professionals to break the color barrier in major American corporations. The Allen L. McKellar papers include clippings, correspondence, financial and sales reports, photographs, sales training and other manuals, newsletters, research reports and other printed materials relating to McKellar's career marketing Pepsi and Falstaff beer products to African American and minority consumers. Celebrity individuals and civic institutions represented in the collection include Barbara McNair, Chicago Urban League, Hank Aaron, James Brown, National Business League and the United States Brewers' Association. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, and the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History & Culture.

The Allen L. McKellar papers include clippings, correspondence, financial and sales reports, photographs, sales training and other manuals, newsletters, research reports and other printed materials relating to McKellar's career marketing Pepsi and Falstaff beer products to African American and minority consumers. Celebrity individuals and civic institutions represented in the collection include Barbara McNair, Chicago Urban League, Hank Aaron, James Brown, National Business League and the United States Brewers' Association.

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Allyson K. Duncan Papers, 1914-2019 7.0 Linear Feet — 0.06 Gigabytes

Allyson Kay Duncan is a U.S. Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. She is the Fourth Circuit's first female African American judge. This collection consists largely of personal and professional correspondence from Duncan's nomination, induction, and service on the Fourth Circuit, with letters from family, friends, and colleagues across the legal profession. The bulk of the collection dates from the 2000s, but includes some assorted materials from her work as an attorney for Kilpatrick Stockton and the NC Utilities Commission in the 1990s.

Collection consists of Duncan's correspondence, including both personal and professional communications with family, friends, and colleagues, including other judges such as Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Diane Wood, J. Harvie Wilkinson III, William Traxler Jr., and several others; press clippings and articles about Duncan's activities as president for the NC Bar Association and her appointment to and service on the U.S. Court of Appeals (4th Circuit); copies of speeches and programs from her various professional activities for Duke Law School and NC Central Law School, among other appearances; assorted materials from her work for the NC Utilities Commission and Kilpatrick Stockton law firm; her diplomas and awards; some family history materials from her parents and other relatives, including her aunt Helen Blackburn and uncle Armour Blackburn; and assorted photographs, largely unlabelled. Also includes published opinions for the NC Court of Appeals and NC Utility Commission and writings by Duncan.

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Alonzo Reed letters, 1864-1866 0.1 Linear Feet — 21 items — 21 items

Union soldier in the 102nd Regiment Infantry, U.S. Colored Troops. Collection consists of 21 personal letters of Alonzo Reed written while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Reed seems to have written some of the letters himself, while others were written for him by friends; all are addressed to his mother. He seems to have been in a camp in Detroit, Michigan, then was stationed in Hilton Head, S.C. in the summer of 1864; he remained there until 1865, when he was sent to Charleston, S.C., and then to Savannah, Georgia, and back to eastern S.C. for the duration. The letters indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, but also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations. Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, and life as a soldier in the midst of war. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.

Collection consists entirely of 21 personal letters from an African American Union soldier, Alonzo Reed, written to his mother while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Some of the letters were written by Reed, some by other individuals, and indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, though they also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations during marches. A brief sketch of the letters is also included in the collection folder.

Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, life as a soldier in the midst of war, and the desire to have news, photos, and writing supplies from home. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.