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Carlyle Marney papers, 1899-1979 58 Linear Feet — Approx. 45,000 Items

The papers of Carlyle Marney span the years 1899-1979, although the bulk of the collection begins in the late 1950s. Included are correspondence, drafts of writings and sermons, press releases, leaflets, pamphlets, bulletins, financial records, clippings, newsletters, calendars, reports, course materials, minutes, printed material, notes, pictures, tapes, and films. Reflected in the papers is information on rural poverty, the American Baptist Convention, the Baptist Church, especially in Texas and North Carolina, Christian writings, Abingdon Press, which published many of Marney's books, and racial prejudice. Concerning prejudice see in particular the Writings and Speeches Series: Marney (Structures of Prejudice) and the Correspondence Series (Church and Race Conference).

The principal focus of the collection is Marney's professional career as a Baptist clergyman, serving two lengthy pastorates at First Baptist Church in Austin, Texas (1948-1958), and at Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina (1958-1967), and as Founder-Director of Interpreters' House, an ecumenical center of study and work at Lake Junaluska, N.C. (1967-1978). He divided his duties to eventually develop a tripartite profession as a pastor, author, and speaker. He transcended his Southern roots to attain a national reputation as a speaker and theologian. The collection illuminates Marney as an independent and controversial figure within the Southern Baptist Church. One of the hallmarks of his ministry, which separated him from most Southern Baptists, was his ecumenical focus. According to his biographer, John J. Carey, "Marney sought to be a force for Baptist renewal and to broaden the ecclesiastical and theological bases of the Southern Baptists."¹

The Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Engagements Series form the major groups in the collection. The Correspondence Series, which comprises almost one-third of the bulk of the collection, consists chiefly of professional correspondence, but there is also a group of folders for Marney family members. Prominent correspondents include James T. Cleland, William Sloan Coffin, Pope A. Duncan, Findley Edge, Harry Golden, William J. Kilgore, Martin Luther King, Jr., Karl Menninger, Bill Moyers, Guy Ranson, and Elton Trueblood. Abingdon Press and the American Baptist Convention also have major files in this series. The Association of Southern Baptists for Scouting, Christian Century Foundation, and the Myers Park Baptist Church are other organizations represented in this series. The above-named topics also appear under appropriate topical headings in the Subject Files Series. There are also files in the Correspondence Series for the Church and Race Conference (Charlotte, N. C., 1965) and the God is Dead movement.

Both published and unpublished works appear in the Writings and Speeches Series. Marney was the author of twelve books and contributed articles to various theological journals; other single sermons appear in various anthologies. Most of his books were published by Abingdon Press, a Methodist publisher. There is also a copy of the book published in 1953, These Things Remain, as well as television programs, 1954, under the same title. Included in this series are the texts of unpublished books, such as City of Light/City of Wilderness,Great Encounter,Recovery of the Church, and Tragic Man/Tragic House.

In the files of writings of other persons are works of Karl Menninger and Guy Ranson, who also appear in Marney's correspondence. Other writers appearing in this section are Rufus Carrollton Harris, William Jackson Kilgore, Franklin Hamlin Littell, John David Maguire, Orval Hobart Mowrer, H. Richard Niebuhr, Schubert Miles Ogden, Clyde Penrose St. Amant, and John Egnar Skoglund.

The Engagements Series, 1958-1978, primarily reflects the latter portion of Marney's career, during his tenure at Myers Park Baptist Church and at Interpreters' House. Both this series and the Calendars Series testify to Marney's busy schedule of speaking appointments, especially during the Myers Park pastorate. In fact, the church hired a full-time administrator to aid in managing the daily activities of the church. Marney preached at major colleges, universities, and seminaries across the United States, including Harvard University, Yale University, and Duke University. He accepted a variety of speaking engagements including the Chautauqua Institute in New York; the Massanetta Center in Virginia; worship services; conferences and symposia; religious organizations, such as Temple Beth El Sisterhood; retreats; and the North Carolina Council of Churches. In addition, Marney spoke at military installations, the Southern Textile Association, and various secular organizations and clubs, such as the Chamber of Commerce, Sertoma Club, and YMCA.

Two major topics in the Subject Series are the Christian Century Foundation, of which Marney was a trustee, and the Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention. These two topics overlap with files in the Correspondence Series. Other files of interest include Abingdon Press, the Boy Scouts of America, the Committee on Religion in Appalachia, First Baptist Church (Austin), Myers Park Baptist Church, and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. There is also a mimeographed copy of a diary (prepared from tapes), 1954, Sept.-Nov., that Marney wrote on a trip to Korea and Japan, as part of a preaching mission for the Army and Air Force in the Far East.

The President's National Advisory Commission on Rural Poverty Series contains reports on aspects of rural poverty, such as economics, education, conservation and development of natural resources, health and medical care, government, housing, and farming.

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Series includes notes on such topics as Christian missions, church history, theology, and Old and New Testament studies. An early volume, 1899-1902, contains notes for a class by W. O. Carver on Christian missions.

The Notes Series contains notes Marney made from the works of various theologians and other authors, such as F.S.C. Northrop, Hans Reichenbach, A. C. Reid, Paul Tillich, Harold H. Titus, Arnold J. Toynbee, and Alfred North Whitehead.

In the Audiovisual Series features sermons, lectures, and books in the following formats: cassette tapes, reel-to-reel tapes, and motion picture films. Of particular interest are the series of reel-to-reel tapes of Laymen's Hour recordings and the Massanetta Springs Recordings made by Marney. The Laymen's Hour was a radio broadcast; most of the recordings in this series are in 1965, with one in 1962. Massanetta Springs, Inc. is the Conference Center of the Synod of Virginia, Presbyterian Church, U. S., located near Harrisonburg, Va. These recordings, 1957-1974, were a series of annual lectures at Bible conferences at the center. Originals are closed to use, but listening copies are available for many of the recordings; otherwise staff need to arrange to have use copies made. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

1. John J. Carey, Carlyle Marney: A Pilgrim's Progress(Macon, Ga.: Mercer University Press, 1980) , p. 36.

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James H. Karales photographs, 1953-2006 and undated 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,000 items

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Noted American photojournalist who worked for LOOK magazine; resident of New York, N.Y. The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly-complete photographic archive of photojournalist James Karales, active from the 1950s to the 1980s. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. His major projects include images from Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam during the war; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging; and individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups - the Martin Luther King, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Civil Rights Series. Other smaller projects include images of California, New Mexico, and other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to almost all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. There are also many print materials and some correspondence and audiovisual materials. Acquired by the Center of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly complete photographic archive of well-known 20th century American photojournalist James Karales. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. The collection is organized around the following project series: Rendville, Ohio, a declining coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam, where Karales documented many scenes from the Vietnam War - the largest series in the collection; the Lower East Side, featuring street scenes and portraits from that New York City neighborhood; and Logging, where Karales documented the Pacific Northwest logging industry's practices and culture. Finally, Karales also shot many images of individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups: the Martin Luther King Series; Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Series; and the Civil Rights Series.

There is also a small group of supporting materials in the Manuscript and Printed Materials Series and the Audiovisual Materials Series that includes biographical documents such as Karales' curriculum vitae; Karales' essays on photography and teaching; publicity for exhibits and other events; correspondence with publishers; digitized images of Vietnam photos on a CD; and clippings, magazine layouts, and other materials related to Karales' published work. One recently dated item is an audiocassette of remarks on Karales' life and works made by Sam Stephenson at the opening of an exhibit of Karales' work at the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

Publications where Karales' works appeared include Look, Life, Saturday Review, Pageant, Coronet, Popular Photography, Time-Life books, and several encyclopedias. Karales also produced commercial work for corporate annual reports. The collection does not include Karales' photojournalistic work from East Germany (1970), or Gheel, Belgium (1961). A number of Karales' images from the U.S. civil rights movement achieved iconographic status, and were - and still are - widely reproduced. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to most but not all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and several hundred color slides. Unless otherwise noted, the photographic items are arranged in the following sequence in each series: contact sheets, prints (from smallest to largest), slides, negatives, and finally, duplicates. There are also digital jpeg files for selected images in certain series (Vietnam, Rendville). One print in the Civil Rights series was created by documentary photographer Alex Harris for an exhibit at Duke University and is noted in the collection guide's entry for this print.

Beginning with the contact sheets, researchers using the collection can note any identifying codes for the image, which may include Karales' job number (Karales assigned most of his jobs or photographic projects alpha-numeric codes), roll number, and frame (image) number, in that order. Whenever possible, Rubenstein staff have included these numbers with individual prints and negatives and within the collection's inventory to aid in matching nd discovery. In addition, staff have noted where film rolls are located within folders. For finished prints (typically 11x14 inches and larger), individual descriptions and unique Rubenstein library identifiers (beginning with "RL") have been assigned. There are a few images that have no identifying numbers and could not otherwise be identified from contact sheets or negatives. Such captions appear in brackets.

In order to facilitate the use of the materials, please consult with a Research Services archivist before coming to use this collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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J. B. Matthews papers, 1862-1986 and undated 479 Linear Feet — 307,000 items

J. B. Matthews (1894-1966) was a Methodist missionary, college professor, author, lecturer, and prominent conservative spokesman. Collection consists of correspondence, memoranda, statements, speeches, reprints, clippings, broadsides, newsletters, press releases, petitions, and other printed material, chiefly 1930-1969. The principal focus of the collection relates to the work and research of Matthews and his associates in the area of anti-communism, particularly in connection with Matthews' role as Director of Research for the Special Committee on Un-American Activities of the U.S. House of Representatives (1938-1945), Executive Director of the Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations of the U.S. Senate (1953), and a consultant for John A. Clements Associates. Many of the organizations, newspapers, periodicals, and persons represented in the collection have various leftist, socialist, communist, radical, or pacifist (especially anti-Vietnam War) connections. Individuals represented in the files include Ralph Abernathy, Bella Abzug, Roy Cohn, John Foster Dulles, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Michael Harrington, Alger Hiss, J. Edgar Hoover, Jesse Jackson, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Coretta Scott King, Joseph Lash, Joseph McCarthy, Carl McIntire, Benjamin Mandel, Richard Nixon, Aristotle Onassis, Lee Harvey Oswald, Linus Pauling, Drew Pearson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Louis Untermeyer.

The papers of J.B. (Joseph Brown) Matthews span the years 1862 to 1986, although the bulk of the collection falls during the 1930s to the 1960s. Included are correspondence, memoranda, statements, speeches, reprints, clippings, broadsides, newsletters, press releases, petitions, and other printed material. there is virtually no material relating to Matthews' early work as a Methodist missionary and college professor or to his involvement with various leftist and radical groups during the 1930s. The principal focus of the collection relates to the work and research of Matthews and his associates in the area of anticommunism. This focus is especially reflected in the Vertical Files, Persons, and Card File Series in the collection with many of the organizations, newspapers, periodicals, and persons represented therein having various leftist, socialist, communist, pacifist, or radical connections. The Vertical Files Series, primarily covering the period of the 1940s through the 1960s, constitutes over three-fourths of the bulk of the total collection, with printed matter comprising a large portion of the individual files. Originally the Vertical Files Series was a set of duplicate files that J.B. Matthews kept while working as a consultant for John A. Clements Associates. He later acquired other material and integrated it into the original files. During processing, many loose papers, unlabelled folders, and unorganized files were integrated into this Series when appropriate. There is, however, some overlap among the materials in the Vertical Files Series, the Research Correspondence Series, and the Persons Files Series.

Organizations represented in the Vertical Files Series include many peace and anti-Vietnam war groups, such as America First Committee, American League Against War and Fascism, American League for Peace and Democracy, American Peace Crusade, American Peace Mobilization, Church Peace Union, Committee for Non-Violent Action, National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Promoting Enduring Peace, Vietnam Day Committee, War Resisters League, World Council of Peace, and Youth Against War and Fascism. Also included are other organizations, such as the Women's International Democratic Federation, Women Strike for Peace, Black Panther Party, National Negro Labor Council, and Revolutionary Action Movement. Other representative categories in this Series include the American Civil Liberties Union, American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born, American Friends Service Committee, American Legion, Americans for Democratic Action, Communism and the Communist Party, Committee for a Democratic Far Eastern Policy, The Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Fellowship of Reconciliation, Foreign Policy Association, Institute of Pacific Relations, Ku Klux Klan, National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, World Federation of Trade Unions, Young Socialist Alliance, United Nations; and the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America. At the end of this series are folders for various miscellaneous organizations and miscellaneous lists of organizations.

The Persons Files Series consists of files of information about persons who were investigated because of suspected communist or communist-front connections and volumes of indexes and selected documents. m e individual persons files, which are generally quite slim, usually include written statements about people and their activities, accusations against them, and other Items such as speeches, memoranda, and clippings, often including the source of the information. This series also includes files gathered by associates of Matthews. Included in the volumes in this series is the "Index to Organizations and their Members," ca. 1930s-1950s. Names of organizations, institutes, conferences, periodicals, committees, councils, appeals, funds, etc., are organized alphabetically. Below the name is the dated source of the information, such as a leaflet or letterhead, followed by the names of members of that organization, often including a brief biographical phrase identifying each person.

Also in the volumes are an "Index to Individuals," and an "Index to Organizations and Publications." These indexes refer to page numbers in the volumes of selected documents where one can locate references to the names of the person, publication, or organization. Examples of the types of documents to be found are letters; portions of newsletters and journals; newspaper clippings; programs; petitions; press releases; articles; announcements of meetings; partial directories; and lists of staff, sponsors, or officers of organizations. Each volume of selected documents is indexed separately. In addition, each volume of selected documents also has its own index at the front. Some volumes are incomplete and/or unbound.

Benjamin Mandel was an important associate of J.B. Matthews and the series within the collection bearing his name forms an important component of the papers. Like Matthews, Mandel also was involved with various communist organizations only to change his views in later life. Mandel was a leading member of the Communist Party in the 1920s and later joined the research staff of the House Un-American Activities Committee and from 1950 to 1967 served as the research director of the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee. Included in this series is a file of correspondence, 1939-1969, between Matthews and Mandel and subject files relating to the F.B.I. and J. Edgar Hoover.

Matthews's personal and private life is reflected in the Personal Series. Included are family papers, private correspondence, material he collected, columns and editorials in which he is mentioned, and Items about his death. Telephone messages, 1949-1955, are mostly typed carbons that were created while he worked for John A. Clements Associates. This series reveals information about family relationships, including his children Joseph, Jr. (married to Helen; children were Susan, and twins Sharon and Steve); Roy (married to Genevieve; children are Brian and JoAnne); Martin S.; Margaret (married to John Burd; children are Larry and Marilyn, who married Thomas Quinn); and Grace (married to Wayne Cressman). In the Joseph Matthews file is information pertaining to the tragic suicide/murder incident involving J.B. Matthews' son, Joseph, Jr. Other family members represented in this series are Matthews' sister, Jesse Matthews Sikes, and his second wife, Ruth E. Shallcross Matthews, who was an economist at the Institute of Paper Chemistry; she later married George Erskine Maynard on July 14, 1951.

In the Ruth I. Matthews series are the papers of the third wife of J.B. Matthews, who also had been a consultant to the Hearst Corporation, but, contrary to her husband, has always held conservative political views. She has had an important career in her own right, most recently as treasurer, assistant publisher, and trustee of Consumer's Research Magazine and as a free lance writer. She has been a professor of sociology at the University of Washington and research editor of Combat, a subsidiary of National Review; helped launch Deadline Data on World Affairs; and was a staff member of the House Committee on Internal Security.

Highlights of the titles in the Volumes Series are "Subversive Activities Investigation" (Investigatory Hearings of the New York Department of Labor's Industrial Commission), 1941; "Master Reference on Communism;" "Communist Perspective: A Handbook of Communist Doctrinal Statements in the Original Russian and English;" "Communism in the Motion Picture Industry;" Joint Statement of Five Employees of Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Company Before the House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor, 1947; and works of J.B. Matthews: Odyssey of a Fellow Traveler and Guinea Pigs No More. In this series are two reports published by John A. Clements Associates: "Report on Venezuela" (1958) and "Report on Guatemala" (1952). A mimeographed report, "Vanguard in Guatemala - The Myth Comes to America," used by J.B. and Ruth I. Matthews for "Report on Guatemala" is in the Addresses and Writings Series.

In the picture cabinet are oversize items, such as an invitation to a dinner and awards presentation sponsored by the American-Russian Institute, including the names of the Board of Directors of the Institute and the sponsors. Also included, from the American League Against War and Fascism folder, is a 1936 calendar with appropriate artwork. A large poster advertises the book Partners in Plunder by J.B. and Ruth Shallcross Matthews.

The collection includes extensive card files, which are principally comprised of files of names. The two major files in the Card Files Series are the J.B. Matthews File and the Donald I. Sweany File. In general, there is more factual information, as opposed to referrals to others sources, in Sweany's File, Although both files contain both types of information. Donald I. Sweany, who compiled the Sweany File, was a friend of the Matthewses' and a member of the American Legion. The card file was originally prepared for the Legion; the Rubenstein Library has the carbon copies he prepared on paper slips. The types of data on the cards include citations to information on persons in periodicals or other sources, such as the Fish Hearings; and biographical information about persons. Sometimes a source is given.

Another file in the Card Files Series is the Titles of Publications File. These cards have the title of a publication at the top, with one or more of the following pieces of information: a number, name of a person, date, letter/number combination, or abbreviation of an organization. The Tocsin File gives citations in this publication for information on persons. Perkins Library stacks does not have holdings of Tocsin. In the Vertical Files Series of this collection, there are a few folders of Tocsin material, including issues from 1960 plus an index to Tocsin, 1961-1965.

Also included in the Card Files Series is the In Process Files, including a variety of cards that Ruth and J.B. Matthews were working on, such as some cards to be filed in the Matthews name file. Other cards contain a statement from a newspaper or petition which was signed by several people. The Matthewses would then type the name of each person at the top of a card with the statement on it, and then file the cards by name. The Miscellaneous File is a small alphabetical file of miscellaneous information, such as addresses. Included are the names and addresses of publications to which the Matthewses subscribed. The 4 X 6 Cards File is a separate set of files that the Matthewses obtained from an unknown source. It primarily contains brief information about organizations, people, and various subjects.

The final file in the Card Files Series is the large J.B. Matthews File. These cards include information about various persons, such as organization affiliation, relationship to the organization, and source of the information. The name of the organization is usually given as an acronym. Other cards give citations for information on persons in various periodicals such as Daily Worker. Titles are given as acronyms, such as "DW." There is a guide key to these acronyms, called "Key to Organizations." It includes both publications as well as organizations, and is located on top of Cabinet 10. A few cards contain information about a person with the source of the information. Some cards note, "See folder in file cabinet of persons." There are folders for some of these names in the Persons Files Series; for others there are not. Another notation on cards is, "See SB File." The "SB" refers to Stephen Birmingham, an investigator for the House Un-American Activities Committee in the 1930s. When he retired, he gave his file to Matthews. The Manuscript Department does not have his file, but it was too time-consuming to remove all these cards.

Throughout the collection, in general, there tend to be small amounts of information about numerous persons. It is not possible to mention here all the important names that appear in the papers. There are subject cards in the card catalog for the names that follow as well as many others. Included is information on Joseph McCarthy, J. Edgar Hoover, Benjamin Mandel, Ralph Abernathy, Bella Abzug, Roy Cohn, John Foster Dulles, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Michael Harrington, Alger Hiss, Jesse Jackson, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Coretta Scott King, Joseph Lash, Fulton Lewis, Malcolm X, Carl McIntire, Francis McNamara, Richard Nixon, Aristotle Onassis, Lee Harvey Oswald, Linus Pauling, Drew Pearson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Louis Untermeyer. In addition, there is some correspondence in the Research Correspondence Series with John T. Flynn, 1947-1964; Westbrook Pegler, 1936-1969; Norman Vincent Peale, 1955-1962; and Victor Riesel, 1948-1952.

It is important when checking for names of persons in the inventory to consult all the following series: Vertical Files Series; Persons Files Series, including the indexes at the end; Research Correspondence Series; and Card Files Series. There are references in some folders to a card for a person in the Card Files Series.

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Dr. Jim D. Hunt was a Professor of Ethics and Religion at Shaw University in Raleigh, NC for almost 30 years. He studied the philosophy of Mohandas K. Gandhi and published several authoritative books on Gandhi, satyagraha, civil rights and peace. The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Jim Hunt Papers span the years 1950s-2000s and document Hunt's academic career as a Professor of Religion and his personal life as an activist for social changes. Items in the collection include research materials, correspondence, writings by and about Dr. Hunt, manuscripts, clippings, printed materials, notebooks, information and multimedia packets, photographs, slides, videos and sound recordings, as well as a few artifacts.

The Research/Subject Files series contains research materials on India and South Africa, writings about Mahatma Gandhi and Martin L. King, book reviews, manuscripts, subject files, photos, and academic papers by Dr. Hunt and others.

The Correspondence series includes personal and professional correspondence received and sent by Dr. Hunt throughout his adult life.

Most of the maps in the Maps series were drawn or collected by Jim Hunt. The bulk of the series was from either India or South Africa.

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Kivie Kaplan was born on April 1, 1904 in Boston, Massachusetts, the youngest of three sons of Benjamin and Celia (Solomont) Kaplan. He joined the NAACP in 1932 and was elected to the National Board in 1954. He was elected president in 1966 and served until his death in 1975. This collection contains correspondence and associated materials of Kivie Kaplan, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from 1966 to 1975. The bulk of the materials are sixteen of Kaplan's letters sent to Harold Gilden, a noted Chicago labor attorney. The letters span the years 1968 to 1971 and provide information about the activities of Kivie Kaplan, while at the NAACP headquarters and speaking to gatherings around the country. Among the people referenced in the letters are Martin Luther King, Jr., the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and prominent civil rights activists in Mississippi and Chicago. The letters also discuss Kaplan's philanthropic activities. The collection also includes eight separately printed items related to the NAACP and the civil rights movement and two NAACP 'Life Member' plaques.

This collection contains correspondence and associated materials of Kivie Kaplan, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) from 1966 to 1975.

The bulk of the materials are sixteen of Kaplan's letters sent to Harold Gilden, a noted Chicago labor attorney who served on the National War Labor Board in 1943 and was named by Presidents Kennedy and Eisenhower to an Emergency Board to investigate labor disputes in 1960 and 1961, and his wife, Elise Gilden. The letters document the growing friendship between the Gildens and the Kaplans preceding their first meetings in person and eventually leading to the Gildens becoming lifetime members in the NAACP. The letters span the years 1968 to 1971 and provide information about the activities of Kivie Kaplan, in his leadership position at the NAACP and speaking to gatherings around the country.

Among the people referenced in the letters are Martin Luther King, Jr. (with an attached photograph of King and Kaplan taken in 1958), the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Charles Evers and Rabbi Abraham Ruderman, two prominent Civil Rights activists from Greenville, Mississippi. Dr. Aaron Henry, a community leader in Clarksdale, Mississippi and Rabbi Arnold Wolf of Chicago. The letters also document Kaplan's efforts at working to lower the voting age to 18 (through the NAACP's Youth Mobilization Program) and attendance at various marches and demonstrations, including the 1969 Peace March in Washington, DC. The letters also discuss Kaplan's philanthropic activities including work on behalf of the American Friends for Religious Freedom in Israel. The letters are arranged in chronological order.

The remainder of the collection includes eight separately printed items (plus enclosures/newspaper clippings, etc.) related to the NAACP, the civil rights movement, and African-American/Jewish relations, and two NAACP 'Life Member' plaques of Howard and Elise Gilden.

For a detailed description of each item in the collection, see the Dealer Description included with the collection.

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The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity. There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included. Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

The Office of Black Church Studies was established as an initiative of the Duke Divinity School in the early 1970s. The office was created to support African American students and faculty in the Divinity School and sustain a specific curriculum on black preaching and the black experience with Christianity.There are materials related to African American churches, civil rights, and the status of African American students and faculty in universities across the country. Materials related to Martin Luther King, Jr.; Benjamin Chavis; Gardner C. Taylor; and Prathia Hall Wynn are included.Some items relate to black church studies at other academic institutions, non-profit organizations, and churches. The collection includes manuscripts, black-and-white and color photographs, digital images, and electronic records contained on compact discs. There are publications that predate the creation of the office.

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Radio TV Services records, circa 1937 - 2012 36.5 Linear Feet — 372 Gigabytes

Established in 1954 as part of the Office of Information Services (now the Office of News and Communications,) Radio TV Services supervises the production of materials for radio and television, assists in the preparation of audio-visual materials needed by the university, and promotes the University's exposure to local, state, and national audiences. It makes documentary films, covers events and functions on campus, sets up news conferences in cooperation with local and national media, interviews university personnel, and provides features on students for their home-town media. Collection includes correspondence, subject files, sound recordings (audiocassettes and reel-to-reel tapes), film (16mm), and video tape (U-Matic and 2-inch quadruplex). Notable people documented on film and tape include Keith Brodie, Terry Sanford, Douglas M. Knight, Orin Pilkey, Robert Menzies, Jerry Falwell, Billy Graham, Queen Noor al Hussein, Jesse Jackson, Waylon Jennings, Juanita Kreps, Robert McNamara, Ronald Reagan, William Westmoreland, Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel, Reynolds Price, Martin Luther King, Jr., Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, Stokely Carmichael, Kenneth Clark, Sidney Cohen, Adam Clayton Powell, Betty Friedan, B. F. Skinner, Sam Ervin, Alex Haley, Tom Wolfe, Buckminster Fuller, and Cesar Chavez. Subjects include Duke University basketball, football, commencement, convocation, homecoming, the Epoch Campaign announcement, student unrest in the 60s, the Silent Vigil held after the death of Dr. King, the Duke Marine Laboratory, the discovery of the U.S.S. Monitor, oceanographic research, the 1954 Orange Bowl, Joe College Weekend, various campus scenes, Duke Gardens, and the Richard Nixon Library controversy. Completed films include Response to Our Challenge and This is Duke. English.

Collection includes correspondence, subject files, images, sound recordings (audiocassettes, reel-to-reel tapes, and digital audio), film (16mm), video tape (U-Matic, 2-inch quadruplex, and digital video), and multimedia of events related to Duke occurring both on and off campus. There is a detailed subject file on index cards for most of the film and some of the sound recordings, as well as other indexes and notes.

Notable people documented on film and tape include Keith Brodie, Terry Sanford, Douglas M. Knight, Orin Pilkey, Robert Menzies, Jerry Falwell, Billy Graham, Queen Noor al Hussein, Jesse Jackson, Waylon Jennings, Juanita Kreps, Robert McNamara, Ronald Reagan, William Westmoreland, Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel, Reynolds Price, Martin Luther King, Jr., Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, Stokely Carmichael, Kenneth Clark, Sidney Cohen, Adam Clayton Powell, Betty Friedan, B. F. Skinner, Sam Ervin, Alex Haley, Tom Wolfe, Buckminster Fuller, and Cesar Chavez. There are also film and recordings documenting Duke University basketball, football, commencement, convocation, homecoming, the Epoch Campaign announcement, student unrest in the 60s, the Silent Vigil held after the death of Dr. King, the Duke Marine Laboratory, the discovery of the U.S.S. Monitor, oceanographic research, the 1954 Orange Bowl, Joe College Weekend, various campus scenes, Duke Gardens, and the Richard Nixon Library controversy. Completed films include "Response to Our Challenge" and "This is Duke".

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Dr. Samuel DuBois Cook (1928-2017) was a political scientist who became Duke University's first African American professor in 1966. He also served as president of Dillard University from 1975 to 1997. The Samuel DuBois Cook Papers contains Cook's speech files, drafts and copies of Cook's writings, and other assorted papers including correspondence and subject folders for his research and writings on Benjamin Elijah Mays. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Samuel DuBois Cook Papers contains Cook's speech files, drafts and copies of Cook's writings, and other assorted papers including correspondence and subject folders for his research and writings on Benjamin Elijah Mays. The correspondence is scattered but dates as early as 1949 and includes some exchanges between Cook and Duke University contacts and administration, written during his tenure as professor in the political science department. Later correspondence discusses Dillard University administration, as well as other personal and professional exchanges. Cook's research on Benjamin E. Mays includes files from his editing of the volume "Benjamin E. Mays: His Life, Contribution, and Legacy," published in 2009, as well as other drafts and files collected by Cook about Mays' writings and philosophy. Cook's other writings include drafts compiled for his Ford Foundation appointment researching desegregation and racism in the 1970s; writings and essays about Reinhold Niebuhr, Martin Luther King Jr., and historically black colleges; and his reflections on black power and the strategies of the civil rights movement. The bulk of the collection consists of Cook's speeches, filed into Dillard University and Professional Speeches subseries and arranged alphabetically by topic or title of the speech. Many of these are administrative, including many introductions of various Dillard speakers or other remarks delivered by Cook as Dillard University president.

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WDBS was Duke University's campus radio station from 1950-1983. It initially broadcast on AM by carrier current, a system in which radio signals were fed into the university's electrical system. In 1971, WDBS began broadcasting on FM 107.1 as a commercial, non-profit station. AM broadcasts ceased in the early 1970s. WDBS was sold in 1983 to repay debts the station owed Duke University. Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club. English.

Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club.