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Collection
Online
On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of Black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a Black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for Black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements; flyers; publications; correspondence; handouts; reports; transcripts; ephemera; clippings; a bibliography; photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969) and the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969); and items related to student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject Files series includes color photographs taken inside the building, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), and items relating to student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover; they are accompanied by the original color negatives. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrances of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

Collection
The Duke Vigil was a peaceful demonstration, sparked by the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., that occurred at Duke University in April 1968. The Vigil involved students, faculty, and non-academic employees of the university and called for racial equality and improved wages for hourly workers. Barry Sharoff organized publicity for the Duke Vigil Strategy Committee. The collection includes fliers, newspapers, press releases, statements, notes, correspondence, and publicly distributed materials regarding the Duke Vigil gathered by Barry Sharoff in his role in charge of publicity for the Vigil, as well as materials related to the 20th anniversary of the Vigil in 1988.

The collection includes fliers, newspapers, press releases, statements, notes, correspondence, and publicly distributed materials regarding the Duke Vigil gathered by Barry Sharoff in his role in charge of publicity for the Vigil.

Included are a number of fliers for Vigil activities, particularly meetings and boycotts; statements and press releases, including statements from Board of Trustees Chair Wright Tisdale, the general faculty, and the Special Trustee-Administrative Committee, and press releases from campus radio WDBS and the Office of Information Services; Barry Sharoff's notes on publicity and organizing efforts; a list of Vigil participants; newspapers, especially the Chronicle, featuring articles on the Vigil; and materials related to the 20th anniversary of the Duke Vigil, celebrated during the 1988 20th reunion of the Class of 1968.

Collection

Christine Mimms papers, 1946-1986 0.5 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Christine Mimms served as secretary/executive assistant to six Duke Presidents, from President William Few to President Terry Sanford. The collection contains correspondence, clippings, photographs and other materials. The material ranges in date from 1946-1986.

Contains correspondence, photographs, postcards, clippings and other materials primarily concerning Mrs. Mimms' career as secretary to Duke's presidents. The collection includes letters from Dr. Knight, Mr. Sanford, W. M. Upchurch and other University figures and the memorial volume from her husband's funeral. The material ranges in date from 1946-1986.

Collection
Online
Douglas M. Knight, born in 1921, served as president of Duke University from 1963 to 1969. Knight was educated at Yale and served as president of Lawrence University prior to becoming president of Duke. After leaving Duke in 1969, he worked as an industry executive at several firms. Records include correspondence, memoranda, proposals, surveys, reports, writings and speeches, minutes, audio-visual media, honorary citations, clippings, and printed matter. Major subjects include the administration of Duke University, the planning of a new art museum, university development, Duke's Fifth Decade Campaign and fundraising, the Duke Board of Trustees, Knight's inauguration, the School of Engineering, the School of Law, the School of Forestry, the Graduate School of Business, student protest, African-American students at Duke, the takeover of the Allen Building by members of the Afro-American Society, and student rights. Major correspondents include R. Taylor Cole, E.R. Latty, Lath Meriam, Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans, R. Philip Hanes, Nancy Hanks, R. Patrick Ransom, George V. Allen, Charles B. Wade, Henry Rauch, Edwin L. Jones, Wright Tisdale, Les Brown, Ellen Huckabee Gobbel, Mark Pinsky, Graddon Rowlands, and Floyd B. McKissick.

The records from the Douglas M. Knight administration form part of the Duke University President Records and span the years between 1952 and 1971, with the bulk occurring between 1963 and 1969. Records created during the administrations of Hollis Edens, J. Deryl Hart, and Terry Sanford are included. The records are comprised of correspondence, memoranda, proposals, surveys, reports, writings and speeches, minutes, audio-visual media, honorary citations, clippings, and printed matter.

The records of the Knight administration are useful for the study of policies and actions regarding academic planning, student life, development and alumni affairs, campus planning, the university's interaction with both local and regional communities, faculty development, and athletics during the 1960s. With the exception of fund-raising and development, the records do not provide extensive documentation on the aforementioned areas of university life. Rather, the records often introduce the primary concerns in an issue or area as well as portray Knight's views and actions. Therefore, researchers may wish to consult an archivist about related record groups and papers, including records from the Deans of the Woman's College and Trinity College, the Provost, the Office of Student Affairs, the Graduate School, and the papers of Eddie Cameron, Athletic Director.

The Douglas M. Knight Papers comprise seven series. The first series, Subject Files, is alphabetically arranged by topic, and covers a broad range of issues during Knight's term. The next series, Development Files, are also arranged alphabetically, and pertain to university advancement. The third series, Correspondence, is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the correspondant. The Reports series is also arranged alphabetically, and consists primarily of annual reports. The fifth series, Surveys, includes a variety of Duke-related surveys on a variety of topics. The next series, Inauguration and Videorecordings, includes photographs and tapes. The last series, Student Files, includes restricted student information.

Some files are restricted and labeled as such. Please consult an archivist concerning these files.

Collection

Duke Vigil collection, 1968 - 1988 2 Linear Feet — 1,500 Items

Online
The Duke Vigil was a silent demonstration at Duke University, April 5-11, 1968, following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The collection features announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, ephemera, press releases, clippings, a diary, sound recordings and WDBS broadcasts, and photographs. Individuals prominent within the collection include John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, David Henderson, Duke President Douglas Knight, Samuel DuBois Cook, and Wright Tisdale. Major subjects include student demonstrations, race relations, Duke University employee wages and labor union, and the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988. Materials range in date from 1968 to 1988. English.

The collection features a variety of materials documenting the Vigil at Duke University from April 5-11, 1968. These materials originate from numerous sources and were compiled by University Archives staff for teaching and research. The first series, Subject files, contains primary documents, including announcements, flyers, publications, handouts, correspondence, reports, and ephemera; media coverage including press releases and clippings; personal papers and a diary about the Vigil from John Blackburn, Kenneth Clark, John Strange, and David Henderson; and analyses and materials relating to the anniversary and reunion of the Vigil in 1988.

The Sound recordings series features five audiotapes made by a Duke student during the Vigil. Additional sound recordings can be found in the Related collections series. These collections include the WDBS broadcast recordings and the University Archives Photograph Collection, and they provide further audio and visual documentation of the Vigil. The WDBS records feature eleven audiotapes of radio broadcasts on events during the Vigil. The Photograph Collection includes over twenty black and white photographs of the Vigil, one color photograph, and numerous negatives, contact prints, and slides.

Collection
Contains correspondence, addresses, reports, memoranda, clippings and printed material documenting Woodhall's role in the governance of the University. Topics include the student unrest of the period, such as the Allen Building takeover and Vietnam War protests, unionization of the Medical Center, the management of University-owned housing, as well as Duke Forest.

Much of the collection is made up of folders Woodhall labeled memorabilia, grouped by month, which include correspondence, copies of newsclippings, Office of Information Services releases, invitations, programs, and other materials. For each month, Woodhall wrote a brief summary of the events and activities that occurred, which sometimes includes commentary or reflection, usually succinct. Most of these events and activities are represented to some degree in the folder.

1969 folders include materials about student protests, including the Allen Building Takeover, and administrative activities around Woodhall's appointmentment as the first Chancellor in the wake of President Knight's announcement of retirement. These folders also include a large number of newsclippings from around the county related to student protests, student involvement in academia, and administrative activities at Duke and elsewhere. 1969 and 1970 folders include some materials about the retirement of Douglas Knight and the selection of Terry Sanford as President of Duke University. Materials from June 1970 on focus primarily on activities in the Medical Center, including the founding of the Davison Club, and Woodhall's professional activities as a neurosurgeon, including his attendance of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons in October 1970 and naming as a Statesman of Medicine in 1971.

The bulk of the memorabilia is made up of news releases and newsclippings. Much of the original material is related to the Medical Center. A smaller portion is related to Woodhall's activities as the Special Assistant to the President and then as Chancellor Pro Tem of the University. These materials include correspondence with administrators and members of the Board of Trustees as well as letters from friends, faculty, and members of the public, and other materials.

The remainder of the collection is made up of subject files, alphabetical by topic, which also includes some correspondence, printed matter, and other materials.

Collection

Radio TV Services records, circa 1937 - 2012 36.5 Linear Feet — 372 Gigabytes

Established in 1954 as part of the Office of Information Services (now the Office of News and Communications,) Radio TV Services supervises the production of materials for radio and television, assists in the preparation of audio-visual materials needed by the university, and promotes the University's exposure to local, state, and national audiences. It makes documentary films, covers events and functions on campus, sets up news conferences in cooperation with local and national media, interviews university personnel, and provides features on students for their home-town media. Collection includes correspondence, subject files, sound recordings (audiocassettes and reel-to-reel tapes), film (16mm), and video tape (U-Matic and 2-inch quadruplex). Notable people documented on film and tape include Keith Brodie, Terry Sanford, Douglas M. Knight, Orin Pilkey, Robert Menzies, Jerry Falwell, Billy Graham, Queen Noor al Hussein, Jesse Jackson, Waylon Jennings, Juanita Kreps, Robert McNamara, Ronald Reagan, William Westmoreland, Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel, Reynolds Price, Martin Luther King, Jr., Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, Stokely Carmichael, Kenneth Clark, Sidney Cohen, Adam Clayton Powell, Betty Friedan, B. F. Skinner, Sam Ervin, Alex Haley, Tom Wolfe, Buckminster Fuller, and Cesar Chavez. Subjects include Duke University basketball, football, commencement, convocation, homecoming, the Epoch Campaign announcement, student unrest in the 60s, the Silent Vigil held after the death of Dr. King, the Duke Marine Laboratory, the discovery of the U.S.S. Monitor, oceanographic research, the 1954 Orange Bowl, Joe College Weekend, various campus scenes, Duke Gardens, and the Richard Nixon Library controversy. Completed films include Response to Our Challenge and This is Duke. English.

Collection includes correspondence, subject files, images, sound recordings (audiocassettes, reel-to-reel tapes, and digital audio), film (16mm), video tape (U-Matic, 2-inch quadruplex, and digital video), and multimedia of events related to Duke occurring both on and off campus. There is a detailed subject file on index cards for most of the film and some of the sound recordings, as well as other indexes and notes.

Notable people documented on film and tape include Keith Brodie, Terry Sanford, Douglas M. Knight, Orin Pilkey, Robert Menzies, Jerry Falwell, Billy Graham, Queen Noor al Hussein, Jesse Jackson, Waylon Jennings, Juanita Kreps, Robert McNamara, Ronald Reagan, William Westmoreland, Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel, Reynolds Price, Martin Luther King, Jr., Hubert Humphrey, Richard Nixon, Stokely Carmichael, Kenneth Clark, Sidney Cohen, Adam Clayton Powell, Betty Friedan, B. F. Skinner, Sam Ervin, Alex Haley, Tom Wolfe, Buckminster Fuller, and Cesar Chavez. There are also film and recordings documenting Duke University basketball, football, commencement, convocation, homecoming, the Epoch Campaign announcement, student unrest in the 60s, the Silent Vigil held after the death of Dr. King, the Duke Marine Laboratory, the discovery of the U.S.S. Monitor, oceanographic research, the 1954 Orange Bowl, Joe College Weekend, various campus scenes, Duke Gardens, and the Richard Nixon Library controversy. Completed films include "Response to Our Challenge" and "This is Duke".

Collection
Terry Sanford was a politician and President of Duke University from 1970 to 1985. He was Governor of North Carolina from 1961-1965, a United States Senator from 1986-1992, and campaigned for the Democratic Party nomination for President in 1972 and 1976. The Records and Papers of Terry Sanford include administrative records, personal papers, manuscripts, photographs, sound and video records, and other materials gathered by Terry Sanford during his careers as a politician and the President and President Emeritus of Duke University.

University administrative records, personal papers, manuscripts, photographs, printed matter, memorabilia, and other material created or received by Terry Sanford during his various careers as a lawyer, politician, and President and President Emeritus of Duke University. The bulk of material consists of records from his tenure as President, 1969-1985. A folder list for these records (Series 1). Also included are substantial records on Sanford's 1972 and 1976 campaigns for the Democratic Party nominee for President, as well as personal and political files related to his many interests and activities throughout his political career. Series 2 and Series 4 as well as portions of Series 3 are not fully processed although some content information is available in the series descriptions. [Note: Materials in this collection may use outdated terms such as "mentally retarded" to refer to people with mental disabilities.]

Collection
Online
WDBS was Duke University's campus radio station from 1950-1983. It initially broadcast on AM by carrier current, a system in which radio signals were fed into the university's electrical system. In 1971, WDBS began broadcasting on FM 107.1 as a commercial, non-profit station. AM broadcasts ceased in the early 1970s. WDBS was sold in 1983 to repay debts the station owed Duke University. Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club. English.

Collection includes annual reports, correspondence, proposals, newspaper clippings, advertising, program guides, record company photographs and press releases, and other materials related to the operation of WDBS. There are also reel-to-reel sound recordings of broadcasts from the 1960s and 1970s, including speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokeley Carmichael, Douglas Knight, Samuel Dubois Cook, Charles Goodell, Robert Shelton, Spiro Agnew, Julian Bond, Birch Bayh, William Kunstler, Floyd McKissick, Richard Kleindienst, and Terry Sanford. News events and other subjects represented on tape include the 1968 Vigil, the 1969 takeover of the Allen Building by the Afro-American Society, racial unrest in Durham, anti-war activism, the 1971 USA Pan-Africa track meet, the 1972 Republican National Convention, the dedication of the William R. Perkins Library, and the Duke Symposium. Musical recordings include an organ recital, the Concert Band, and the Glee Club.