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Collection
Collection consists of two series, Civil War Papers and Lee Family Papers, acquired and assembled by collectors Alfred and Elizabeth Brand. Materials relate to the Lee family, including Francis Lightfoot Lee, Henry Light Horse Harry Lee, Richard Henry Lee, and Robert E. Lee, as well as Civil War history, including battle reports, correspondence between Confederate and Union leaders and officers (such as Braxton Bragg, Jefferson Davis, William T. Sherman, and Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson), presidential pardons and oaths of allegiance, and some printed materials.

Letters, reports, certificates of appointment, receipts, loans, and other documents pertaining to the Civil War and to the Lee family, and collected by Alfred and Elizabeth Brand. The Civil War Papers Series includes battle reports from Bull Run (1861), Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg; Confederate Army General Orders Nos. 9, 64, and 18; letters detailing the operation of the Confederate Army, outcomes of battles, and Confederate opinions about the Civil War and specific officers. Includes a broadside, "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!;" a transcription of an interview with Jefferson Davis by newspaper writer Augustus C. Buell (1876); a draft of the poem "The Conquered Banner" by the Rev. Abram J. Ryan (1865); two engravings (of Grant and Sherman); John H. Miller and M. French's obligation and oath of allegiance to Virginia and to the Confederate States of America (1862); and J. C. Winsmith's oath of allegiance to the USA and pardon from Andrew Johnson and William H. Seward (1865).

Writers and correspondents in this Series are primarily from Virginia (especially Berkeley County) and Kentucky. Named individuals include Pierre Gustave Tonte Beauregard, Braxton Bragg, David Holmes Conrad, Samuel Cooper, Samuel Wylie Crawford, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, J. E. Johnson, I. Nadenbousch, Daniel Ruggles, William T. Sherman, and Edwin M. Stanton.

The Lee Family Papers Series comprises primarily Colonial-era governmental and financial documents pertaining to Francis Lightfoot Lee, "Henry Light Horse Harry" Lee, and Richard Henry Lee, Sr. Documents pertain to slavery and enslaved people; maps and surveys of leased land; and loan indentures. Includes certificates appointing Francis Lightfoot Lee as Justice of the Peace (1757-1768); and a letter from Richard Henry Lee, Sr., to Henry Lee regarding the colonists' agitation for freedom (1770). Ante-bellum and Civil War documents in the Lee family papers include loan indentures; a bill of sale for cotton to the Confederate government; two cartes-de-visite (of Robert E. Lee); letters written by Richard Henry Lee, Jr., discussing the sale of his sister's slaves; and a letter from Robert Edward Lee to Samuel Cooper regarding poorly executed military orders (1865). Several documents throughout the collection include the original rare manuscripts dealer's description.

Collection

George Hoffman Slater papers, 1777-1921 1.5 Linear Feet — 1483 Items

Personal and business papers of George Hoffman Slater of "Rose Hill," Upperville, Va., but also including papers of several other Virginia families, the James Lee family, and the Deatherage and Lake families. Papers of George Hoffman Slater include personal and business correspondence, school papers, bills, and receipts.

Collection

Lee Family papers, 1780-1851 0.5 Linear Feet — 224 Items

Delaware and Maryland residents and owners of Louisiana sugar plantation. Chiefly letters and papers of John Lee, lawyer and Federalist politician, and his brother-in-law, Outerbridge Horsey, attorney general of Delaware and U.S. senator from Delaware, relating to their joint ownership of a sugar plantation in Thibodeauville, Louisiana, 1828-1834, including a number of items from the lawsuit which ended the partnership pertaining to the management of the plantation. There is also a plantation account book (with index), dated 1829-1836, for the sugar plantation, which includes information about overseers, inventories, slave lists, debts, purchases (both slaves and land), expenses for provisioning slaves and for operations, planting and harvesting dates for crops, production totals, and crop sales, and more. Also contains a few papers of Thomas Sim Lee concerning his service as governor of Maryland, 1779-1783.

Chiefly letters and papers of John Lee, lawyer and Federalist politician, and his brother-in-law, Outerbridge Horsey, attorney general of Delaware and U.S. senator from Delaware, relating to their joint ownership of a sugar plantation in Thibodeauville, Louisiana, 1828-1834, including a number of items from the lawsuit which ended the partnership pertaining to the management of the plantation. There is also a plantation account book (with index), dated 1829-1836, for the sugar plantation, which includes information about overseers, inventories, slave lists, debts, purchases (both slaves and land), expenses for provisioning slaves and for operations, planting and harvesting dates for crops, production totals, and crop sales, and more. Also contains a few papers of Thomas Sim Lee concerning his service as governor of Maryland, 1779-1783.

Collection

Robert E. Lee papers, 1749-1975 3 Linear Feet — 204 Items

Robert E. Lee was a Virginia-born career military officer, Confederate general in the U.S. Civil War, and president of what is now Washington and Lee University. Family and military correspondence of Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), Confederate general-in-chief; and of his descendants; and a few letters of Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Henry Lee, and Mary Ann Randolph (Custis) Lee. The letters deal with many phases of Robert E. Lee's life from his marriage in 1832 until his death, including family and personal affairs, especially in his letters to a cousin, Mrs. Anna M. Fitzhugh; settlement of the Custis estate; and improvements at the family house in Arlington, Virginia. Included also is one volume of 295 telegram dispatches sent by Robert E. Lee from the field to Jefferson Davis and the Confederate War Department; two scrapbooks memorializing Robert E. Lee; a small notebook in Robert E. Lee's hand, 1857-1860, containing amounts of meat purchased for the Arlington household; and a letterpress book of Robert E. Lee III, a lawyer of Washington, D.C.

Family and military correspondence of Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), Confederate general-in-chief; and of his descendants; and a few letters of Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Henry Lee, and Mary Ann Randolph (Custis) Lee. The letters deal with many phases of Robert E. Lee's life from his marriage in 1832 until his death, including family and personal affairs, especially in his letters to a cousin, Mrs. Anna M. Fitzhugh; settlement of the Custis estate; and improvements at the family house in Arlington, Virginia. During the Civil War the correspondence consists of official and family letters, the former containing much information on military activities. The postwar letters reveal details of domestic arrangements following the family's removal to Lexington, Virginia.

One volume contains 295 telegrams (collected and arranged by C.C. Jones, Jr., and published by D.S. Freeman, Lee's Dispatches, New York, 1915) sent by Lee from the field to Jefferson Davis and the Confederate War Department, many having been endorsed by James A. Seddon. These dispatches relate to troop movements, reports of the intelligence service, skirmishes, enemy activities, transportation of prisoners and wounded men, and other details of military operations. Included also are two scrapbooks memorializing Robert E. Lee, chiefly consisting of clippings and engravings; a small notebook in Robert E. Lee's hand, 1857-1860, containing amounts of meat purchased for the Arlington household; and a letterpress book of Robert E. Lee III, a lawyer of Washington, D.C.