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Abigail Buttens letter to Desire Clark, 1781 April 28 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Abigail Buttons was the daughter of Desire Clark. Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever.

Collection comprises a letter from Abigail Buttens, Wilmington, to her mother, Desire Clark, Chester, dated 1781 April 28. She announces the death of her oldest daughter from a fever and asks for "... prayers for me that God would inable me to behave my self in Christian manner in whatsoever he calls me to meet with." She requests a visit from her mother and her brother, John.

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Abortion Rights Association, Inc., photographs and pamphlets, 1972-1974 and undated 1.0 Linear Foot

Seven mounted photographs and five pamphlets from the Abortion Rights Association of New York, later known as the Abortion Rights Association, Inc., dating between 1972 and 1974. Pamphlets explain abortion procedures, clinic and physician guidelines, and women's rights to abortion, largely designed to address and implement the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade. Photographs (which contain captions) include black-and-white images of tools used in self-induced abortions; coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-induced abortions; morgue photographs of infanticide victims; and images of fetuses in utero.

Collection consists of a set of seven mounted photographs, apparently intended for exhibition, and a set of five pro-choice pamphlets created by the Abortion Rights Association of New York (later known as Abortion Rights Association, Inc.). The photographs include coroner's office photographs of deceased women following self-inflicted abortions; morgue photographs of infanticides; equipment and tools used in self-inflicted abortions; and fetuses in utero, one with deformed brain. Author of the included captions is unknown. The pamphlets, written to assist New York physicians and practioners implementing the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, address women's rights to clinical abortions, abortion laws, counseling and guidance on policies, and references to New York abortion clinics and practitioners.

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Ada Lovelace Letter, August 5, [1841 or 1847] 1 item

Ada Lovelace was a mathematician in 19th century England and the only legitimate child of the poet George Gordon, Lord Byron. She is often recognized as the creator of the first set of instructions meant to be carried out by a machine, and is thus seen as a pioneer of what would later become computer programming. The Ada Lovelace letter is a one-page note to [Fortunato] Prandi, an Italian interpreter, regarding ten guineas Lovelace owed Prandi.

Consists of a single hand-written letter to [Fortunato] Prandi, dated Thursday 5th August. Date could be 1841 or 1847. One page, folded, written on front and back.

The letter is apparently in reply to a request for ten guineas owed by Lovelace to Prandi. She discusses putting off sending him the sum because of travel and also "disagreeable business." She goes on to say she is well in spite of being a "disconsolate widow" and will soon "leave town", "probably to Brighton". The letter closes with an apology for the lateness of repayment and includes a postscript noting her amusement at the "modesty" of his request. It is signed A. A. Lovelace.

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Adelaide Johnson papers, 1884-1945 and undated 0.4 Linear Feet

Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

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Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

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Alice Morse Earle letters, 1896-1899 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Alice Morse Earle (1851-1911) was an American historian and author from Worcester, Massacusetts. Collection comprises two letters written by Earle, along with an unrelated cover addressed to her.

Collection comprises two letters written by Earle, along with an unrelated cover addressed to her. One letter (1896) was written in response to a request for an autograph; the other letter (1899) was written to C.[?] M. Perry regarding her search for photographs to illustrate a book on New England.

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Alice Stopford Green letter, 13 October 1911 0.1 Linear Feet

The Irish historian Alice Stopford Green writes to an unidentified editor or publisher to decline an invitation to write an article on Irish Americans for an upcoming publication.

Green writes to an unidentified male editor or publisher ("Dear Sir"), to decline his invitation to write an article for a forthcoming book. She writes that she is "overwhelmed by work this winter," and that "the subject of the American Irish is almost unknown to me and it would need a considerable time and reading to write anything worthy of your insertion." In conclusion, she writes that she is "keeping in view the idea of getting some work done which may draw attention to your publications." Written on letterhead: 36 Grosvenor Road, Westminster.

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Almira Brown Taylor scrapbooks, 1892-1962, bulk 1935-1945 14.9 Linear Feet

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

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American Women's Voluntary Services enamel pin, 1940s 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."
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Anaïs Nin letter to Thomas C. DiGenti, 1962 February 21 0.1 Linear Feet

Letter from the writer Anaïs Nin to the American book collector, Thomas DiGenti, who is trying to find a copy of her literary magazine Two Cities. Nin does not have one, but directs him to the NYC bookshop The Phoenix, on Cornelia St. She has turned over distribution of Two Cities to The Phoenix at a financial loss due to constraints on her time. Nin writes of her desire to publish the work of new writers. She goes on to describe a recent trip to Europe where she visited London, Brussels, and Paris, where she was well-received because of the popularity of her work there. Nin asks the collector, Thomas C. Di Genti, if he has an extra copy of her book D,H. Lawrence: An unprofessional study. She wants to send it to her London publisher, who is interested in putting out a new edition. Nin states that she's currently busy writing Seduction of the Minotaur, the last part of her Cities of the Interior sequence which she describes as a "finale to the novels."
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Anna Letitia Barbauld and William Allen poems, 1823 August 23-30 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Anna Letitia Barbauld was an English woman of letters who had great professional success at a time when women writers were still something of an anomaly. She is remembered for her poetry, children's literature, essays, criticism, and editorial works. She was rediscovered when feminist literary critics examined her place in British literary history. Barbauld was also an abolitionist, something she had in common with fellow educator and Stoke Newington resident William Allen. This item is a single small sheet of paper with an autograph manuscript poem by Barbauld on the front dated August 23, 1823, and another one on the back by William Allen dated August 30, 1823. Both poems were aimed at a juvenile audience. It is likely that their common interests and close proximity led them to develop a friendship. Although this was written towards the end of Barbauld's life, it is evidence that they still had at least an epistolary relationship in 1823.

Collection consists of a single piece of paper (20 x 12.5 cm) with an autograph manuscript poem by Anna Letitia Barbauld on the front and a poem called "Follow Me" by William Allen on the back. Barbauld's poem reads as follows: Born to the weighty honours of a name/Whose deeds of mercy England's shores proclaim/Yet know, you may inherit lands or pelf/But must, for praise - for love, be good yourself. It's signed A.L. Barbauld and dated August 23rd 1823. The verso contains a two-stanza autograph manuscript devotional poem by William Allen titled "Follow Me." It is signed Stoke Newington 30 of 8th month 1823. Barbauld and Allen were both educators and abolitionists who lived in Stoke Newington at the time of this writing. These poems are evidence that they had at least an epistolary friendship.

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Annie Besant letters, 1882-1883 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Annie Besant was a British socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, writer and orator, and supporter of Irish and Indian self-rule. Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery."

Collection comprises two autograph, signed letters written by Annie Besant. The first, written 1882 May 20, originally accompanied a copy of a petition, and asked the editor of the Evening News to publish the petition, since he published an attack upon "Dr. E. Aveling, the Misses Bradlaugh" and herself, "as teachers of the Science School of the Hall of Science." The second, written 1883 December 4 to an unidentified addressee, indicated "the place of the meeting is the Grosvenor Gallery." Both items written on Besant's stationery, with her name and address printed in brown ink.

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Artemisia Gentileschi letter to Cassiano Dal Pozzo, 1630 August 31 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 leaves

Collection comprises a signed letter (2 leaves; 20 cm x 27 cm) from Artemisia Gentileschi to patron Cassiano Dal Pozzo, written from Naples 1630 August 31. She requests his help in acquiring a license for her assistant, Diego Campanili, to carry arms, and mentions work she is completing for the Empress and a portrait she is painting for Dal Pozzo.
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Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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British women's suffrage societies broadsides and handbills, 1898-1911 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 14 items

Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.
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Carrie F. Young papers, 1872-1894 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 21 items

Carrie F. Young was one of the first advocates of women's suffrage in California, and was an activist for other political causes. Young eventually became a physician, the first woman to receive a medical diploma in California, from the Oakland College of Medicine in 1884. Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials.

Collection includes miscellaneous written materials; flyers, handbills, and broadsides; and copies of serials. There is a letter regarding political matters and a typescript page of general instructions for an unnamed convention, both written by Young's son, Robert E. Bush; a recommendation for Young's work on national campaigns as a Republican poltical activist and speaker, dated 1889; two advertisements for a Mrs. Dr. Tarbell's treatments of "nervous diseases and female complaints;" two pages of guidelines for a populist club; one of Young's calling cards; and an enclosure for the California Medical Journal. There is also a brochure for "photographic fern-leaf mottoes." In addition, there are 8 flyers, handbills, and broadsides, all advertising political speeches (especially for the People's Party), lectures, or medical work by Young, except for two that advertise speeches by Mrs. M. S. Singer of Chicago, and Dr. J. V. C. Smith. Collection also includes issues of the serials Life Crystals (March 1882, no. 3), edited by Young, and Pacific Journal of Health (January-September 1872, nos. 1-9), published by Young.

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Charles Nordhoff letter to William C. Russel, 1881 May 12 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Charles Nordhoff (31 August 1830 - 14 July 1901) was an American journalist, descriptive and miscellaneous writer. Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881.

Collection comprises a private autograph letter, signed, that Charles Nordhoff wrote to William C. Russel, acting president of Cornell University, in 1881. The topic of the letter is Russel's stand against Henry Ward Beecher; Nordhoff writes "to send you my congratulations & hearty good wishes, as the manly stand you have taken in [regard?] to Mr. Beecher. I am sorry that you should be made to suffer for doing what I believe was your most solemn & imperative duty as the guardian of [illegible] men & women...."

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Charlotte Brontë letter to Ellen Nussey, 1840 November 12 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

Collection comprises a autographed letter (4 pgs., 19 cm x 23 cm) written by Charlotte Brontë to her lifelong friend Ellen Nussey on 1840 November 12, possibly from Yorkshire. Pages also hold sketches of her and of a horse head created by William Weightman (1814-1842), who was assistant curate to Patrick Brontë beginning in 1839. Topics include Weightman’s drawings; an invitation to her to provide entertainment; procuring students for a local school; and the abusive and dissolving relationship between Mr. Collins, who was a curate, and his wife. Includes Brontë’s negative assessment of Mr. Collins’ character. Collection includes a typescript transcription of the letter.

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Charlotte Brontë needlepoint flower study, approximately 1840 0.9 Linear Feet — canvas, thread — ;frame 25 cm, 31 cm, 2 cm

Decorative needlepoint flower study on a cream background, possibly worked in wool thread, of a white lily at top, with light pink accents on leaves and blue stamen, surrounded by five green and blue-green leaves. At lower left is a deep pink peony with white accents, surrounded by three green and brown leaves with veins in brown and blue. At lower right is a red carnation, with pink and brown petal edges. It is surrounded by a carnation bud, and two green leaves with veins in brown and blue. Brontë completed the piece around 1840. It was placed underneath a green velvet mat with oval center opening measuring 11 x 14 cm, then enclosed in a wooden frame 25 x 31 cm, which was painted gold, then "antiqued" on three sides. In hand-painted black lettering on gold paint at the bottom of the frame appears the statement, "Sampler by Charlotte Bronte," although the work is not a sampler.
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Chevalier d'Eon papers, 1778-1779 1.0 Linear Foot — 8 items

Charles Geneviève Louis Auguste André Timothée d'Eon de Beaumont, known as Chevalier d'Eon, was a French diplomat, spy, freemason and soldier who fought in the Seven Years' War. Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War.

Collection comprises a dossier of seven items (approximately 75 pages) compiled by Chevalier d'Eon articulating his wish to forsake his female persona in order to fight in the American Revolutionary War. The seven items are wrapped in a blue paste-paper wrapper. The first item is a collection of 35 commissions and supporting documents from diplomats, military officers and French, Russian or English ministers, testifying to Eon's qualities and his activity in the secret services for 20 years, including the peace mission to the court of Russia (1755-1756); a mission to Vienna carrying the campaign plan of the Russian army and revelation of a secret Russian-Prussian correspondence, along with another mission to Russia (1757); commission as secretary of the French embassy at the court of Russia, after having contributed to the success of four treaties (1757-1759); commission as aide-de-camp of maréchal de Broglie in Germany (1760-1762); secretary of the French Embassy in Great Britain, for the conclusion of peace (1762); resident, then Minister Plenipotentiary in London (1763); refusal of proposals to communicate particulars and papers relative to the peace to the opponents of the court of St. James (1764-1765); followed by a Franco-British plan for the Mexican and Peruvian uprisings against Spain (1766-1768) for the Spanish ambassador in London; against the accusations of venality and corruption by the Court of France by the Princess of Wales and the English ministers (1769-1770); secret correspondence with Louis XV, the Prince de Conti, the Comte de Broglie, all ending in a promise of a life annuity from Louis XV.

The second item is a brief Memoire by d'Eon, dated 20 May 1778, for the Count of Vergennes, Minister for Foreign Affairs, in order to obtain payment of his pension, with a copy of 5 supporting documents. The third item is a memorandum describing the Chevalier's affairs in England, as of August 1778, including rents due on a house in Brewer Street/Golden Square, which is scheduled to be demolished. There are further details of d'Eon's state of affairs in France, where the Chevalier blames his feminine state and sedentariness as cause of a very painful rheumatism. D'Eon accordingly begs the King and his ministers to allow him to don men's clothes and fight.

Items four through seven are signed letters. One to M. de Miromesnil, Garde des Sceaux, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of his petition to the King's special adviser, the Comte de Maurepas, of the 8th of February, asking support for the Chevalier's request to serve as a volunteer in the Comte d'Orvilliers' fleet. The other two letters are written to the Comtesse de Maurepas, Versailles 12 February 1779, with a copy of the Chevalier's petition to the comte, 8 February, requesting the comte's protection.