Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Names Melville, Herman, 1819-1891 Remove constraint Names: Melville, Herman, 1819-1891

Search Results

collection icon

Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated 15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items

Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

collection icon
Trained as muralist, b. in Terre Haute, Ind. in 1907, d. 1991. From 1940s-1960s worked in various media to interpret Moby Dick visually. Collection comprises undated, typeset copies of the synopsis (12 pgs.) for the musical drama "The White Whale," based on Melville's novel; notes on the set and costumes (3 pgs.) for the musical, and two versions of one page of dialog for the musical itself. Also includes a 1949 program for Wilson's gallery exhibit of 100 color drawings based on the novel, entitled "Moby Dick." There is no indication whether the musical was produced.

Collection comprises undated, typeset copies of the synopsis (12 pgs.) for the musical drama "The White Whale," based on Melville's novel; notes on the set and costumes (3 pgs.) for the musical, and two versions of one page of dialog for the musical itself. Also includes a 1949 program for Wilson's gallery exhibit of 100 color drawings based on the novel, entitled "Moby Dick." There is no indication whether the musical was produced.

collection icon

M. Thomas Inge papers, 1978-1982, 1988-1989 4.6 Linear Feet — 5 items

The M. Thomas Inge Papers (1978-1982, 1988-1989) consist of the corrected manuscripts of five works of which Inge was the editor: Handbook of American Popular Culture (HAPC; 3 vols., 1978-1981), Bartleby the Inscrutable (1979), Concise Histories of American Popular Culture (1981), Handbook of American Popular Literature (1988), and the second edition of HAPC (3 vols., 1989). The Inge papers demonstrate not only the development of M. Thomas Inge's scholarly and editorial acumen, but also the growth of the study of American popular literature and culture.

For Bartleby the Inscrutable, M. Thomas Inge was able to recruit contributions from several important scholars and critics of American literature, including Lewis Leary, Lewis Mumford, Egbert S. Oliver, Alfred Kazin, Richard Chase, Leo Marx, and Hershel Parker.

A member of the American Studies Association, the Modern Language Association, and the Popular Culture Association, M. Thomas Inge edited collections of essays on Faulkner's Light in August, frontier humorists, and Ellen Glasgow before becoming the general editor of Greenwood Press's Research Guides in Popular Culture series in 1977. Inge solicited essays from a number of American cultural studies specialists for the original 1978-1981 HAPC, a project that subsequently led not only to two spinoff projects--the 1981 Concise Histories volume and the 1988 Handbook of American Popular Literature--but also to the 1989 second edition of HAPC. Selected essays in the first edition of HAPC were revised (and abridged) for the Concise Histories volume and further revised either for the Handbook of Popular Literature or for the second edition of HAPC. Thus, by looking in particular at these four items in the Book Manuscripts Series and observing the various additions and deletions, it is possible to trace how several critics--among them James J. Best, Richard Etulain, Katherine Fishburn, Donald A. McQuade, Richard N. Masteller, Nancy Pogel, Janice Radway, Anne E. Rowe, Richard Guy Wilson, and Inge himself--evolved in their views of their areas of specialty.

Collections in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library related to the M. Thomas Inge papers include the Lewis Gaston Leary papers, the Lewis Mumford papers, and the Egbert S. Oliver papers.

collection icon

Stanley Thomas Williams papers, 1921-1955 1.5 Linear Feet — 66 Items

Williams was a Professor of English at Yale University. The collection includes lecture notes, reprints, manuscripts and drafts.

Lecture notes on Brook Farm, James Fenimore Cooper, Benjamin Franklin, Washington Irving, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Herman Melville, and Henry David Thoreau, and American literature of the 17th and 18th centuries; reprints of articles and reviews by Williams; and manuscripts and drafts of Italy and the American Literary Pilgrim, and The Good and Great for Company.